Alondra Delgado to Appear on Season 3 of the CW’s “All American”

Alondra Delgado is an All American…

The Puerto Rican actress has landed a recurring role on the third season of the CW’s All American.

Alondra Delgado 

Season 2 found Spencer James (Daniel Ezra), now a football state champion, with a tough decision to make. Does he stay in Beverly Hills and play for Coach Billy Baker (Taye Diggs)? Or does he move back home to South L.A., reunite with his mother, Grace (Karimah Westbrook), brother, Dillon (Jalyn Hall), and play for his father, Corey (Chad Coleman), the new head coach for the South Crenshaw Chargers?

Delgado will play Vanessa Montes, the “new girl” at school and the new head coach’s daughter. Unapologetic and confident, she doesn’t let the extra attention that comes with being the new kid phase her. She has a surprising history with one of her classmates.

Delgado most recently has recurred on FX’s Mayans M.C. Her other credits include Vida and Easy Street.

Nick Gonzales: The Top Latino Pick in This Year’s MLB Draft

Life’s the Pitts for Nick Gonzales

The 21-year-old Latino baseball shortstop and second baseman for the New Mexico State Aggies was the No. 7 pick during the 2020 MLB draft.

Nick Gonzales

Gonzalez, the first Latino pick in this year’s draft, was chosen by the Pittsburgh Pirates

“It’s just awesome,” Gonzales said. “I can’t explain it. This is something that I’ve put a lot of work into and I’m super fortunate it came.”

As a freshman at New Mexico State in 2018, Gonzales hit .347/.425/.596 with nine home runs and 36 RBI over 57 games. As a sophomore in 2019, he led the nation with a .432 batting average.He finished the season hitting .432/.532/.773 with 16 home runs and 80 RBI. 

After the season, he played collegiate summer baseball for the Cotuit Kettleers of the Cape Cod League, where was named the MVP of the league.

Gonzales entered his junior year in 2020 as a top prospect for the 2020 Major League Baseball draft.

The 5-foot-11-inch Gonzales, an NCAA batting champion and unanimous All-American, will reportedly earn  $5,432,400.

Anthony Robles’ Inspiring Story to Be Made Into Film

Anthony Robles’ life story is headed to the big screen…

Dany Garcia and Dwayne Johnson’s Seven Bucks Productions has teamed up with 101 Studios on Unstoppable, a film that tells the inspiring story of the 31-year-old Latino wrestler.

Anthony Robles

Despite being born with only one leg to a single-parent family living on the wrong side of the tracks, Robles overcame every obstacle to become an undefeated collegiate wrestling star, three-time All-American, 2011 NCAA National Champion, two-time ESPY Award winner and a National Wrestling Hall of Famei nductee.

John Hindman wrote the script, based on Unstoppable: From Underdog to Undefeated: How I Became a Champion, a 2012 memoir Robles wrote with Austin Murphy

“Words cannot express how honored I am to have my story made into a film. Because I was born missing my leg, my entire life I’ve had to deal with people having low expectations of me,” says Robles. “When I got into wrestling, most people thought it was impossible for me to become even an average wrestler. I’m hopeful that people who see Unstoppable will walk away believing that you should never let your challenges define you. If you have a goal, go after it with everything you’ve got. Nothing is impossible.”

“Our entire Seven Bucks team is passionate about sharing stories that inspire and resonate on a global scale. We’ve had an eye on Anthony’s story for a long time and have been deeply moved by his perseverance that proves nothing is impossible. The powerful themes of redemption and tackling life’s obstacles are very familiar to us, we are excited to bring this triumphant underdog story to life.

“Anthony’s story is really special and reveals the passion, determination and fearlessness needed to overcome challenges,” Seven Bucks’ Hiram Garcia added. “Investing in the right stories with universal appeal is a huge priority for us at Seven Bucks, but more importantly, we want to share stories like Anthony’s that motivate the world.”

David Glasser, CEO of 101 Studios, said the company was “moved and inspired by Anthony’s triumphs on the mat, but—even more so—his triumphs of spirit and determination in his personal life. Unstoppable embodies the types of films that we want to bring to the screen: films that resonate universally because of their power to connect with audiences.”

The project will follow a fast track to production. 

Gina Rodriguez Appears in the CW’s New Inclusion & Representation Campaign #CWOpenToAll

Gina Rodriguez is representing the represented on The CW

The network has launched #CWOpenToAll, a new on-air, digital, social and print campaign designed to reinforce the network’s commitment to inclusion and representation, featuring the 34-year-old Puerto Rican actress and Jane the Virgin star.

Gina Rodriguez

“We think this campaign really captures the spirit and mission of the CW and why our fans come to us,” said network president Mark Pedowitz. “We are committed to making sure our viewers see themselves represented on screen, and that we also have diverse voices being heard behind the camera.”

Pedowitz points out that 12 out of the CW’s 17 series this season are created and/or executive produced by women or people of color. Additionally, the network sees 47% women series regulars across its shows and 49% people of color series regulars.

“We are proud of the strides we’ve made and are continuing to make, and #CWOpenToAll reflects that, and helps drive the message that we want to be known as a place where all are welcome to be, and all are welcome to watch,” he continued.

#CWOpenToAll will feature a video component, with spots airing during the network’s primetime programming as well as being placed in house ad slots on cwtv.com, the CW and CW Seedapps and on social channels. There will also be a print portion of the campaign, which begins rolling out Monday in major market newspapers and industry trade publications. The message for both is that “the CW is a place for everyone, and all are welcome on-screen and in our audience.”

In addition to Rodriguez and her Jane the Virgincostars Jaime Camiland Justin Baldoni, who kicks off the video, other participating CW talent includes Riverdale’sCamila Mendes, Ashleigh Murrayand Casey Cott; Supernatural’s Jensen Acklesand Jared Padalecki; All American’s Daniel Ezra, Bre-Zand Taye Diggs; Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s Rachel Bloom and Vincent Rodriguez III, television’s first transgender superhero, Supergirl’s Nicole Maines, and The Flashhimself, Grant Gustin.

Aguilar and Her Teammates Lead the U.S. Women’s Softball Team to First World Title in Six Years

It’s turned out to be a special weekend for Ali Aguilar…

The Latina softball player helped lead the United States women’s softball team to its first softball world title in six years.

United States women's softball team

Aguilar and her teammates took back the World Baseball Softball Confederation World Championship on Sunday, beating Japan 7-3 in the championship game in Surrey, British Columbia.

The Americans, who had won seven previous championships before Japan took the title in 2012 and 2014, got three-run home runs from Michelle Moultrie and Haylie McCleney, and raced out to a 7-1 lead in the fourth inning. Japan pitcher Yamato Fujita came on in relief and shut down the U.S. the rest of the way, striking out seven.

McCleney, who was a four-time All-American at Alabama, also came up with a defensive gem for the Americans, throwing out a runner at the plate from center field in the third inning.

Japan cut the lead to 7-3 with solo home runs from Haruna Sakamoto in the fourth inning and Misato Kawano in the fifth.

Aguilar had a pair of hits for the U.S. team and drove in the game’s first run, scoring Jazmyn Jackson, who had doubled, in the first inning. Aguilar scored on Moultrie’s home run.

Jessica Moore, one of four pitchers for the United States, picked up the win in the final.

The U.S. won all nine of its tournament games. Japan lost twice to the Americans.

Aguayo Drafted in the Second Round of the NFL Draft

Roberto Aguayo is headed to the National Football League

The 21-year-old Latino kicker, who played for Florida State, was picked in the second round of the NFL draft.

Roberto Aguayo

Aguayo, the 59th pick overall, was selected by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, becoming the highest-drafted kicker since Mike Nugent in 2005.

The NFL’s lengthened extra point has put new emphasis on the play, now effectively a 33-yard attempt. Aguayo was perfect on his 198 PATs in college. More pertinent, the 2013 Lou Groza Award winner was 69-for-78 (88.5%) on field-goal tries and didn’t miss on any of his 49 attempts inside 40 yards.

Aguayo, quarterback Jameis Winston‘s teammate at FSU, expressed a desire to play for the Bucs and seems likely to hold the job for years to come.

But Aguayo wasn’t the only Latino footballer picked during this year’s NFL draft…

Blake Martinez is headed to the Green Bay Packers

The Packers selected the Latino inside from Stanford with the 131st pick, which arrived late in the fourth round, and contained a bit of a premonition from his mother, Carrisa Martinez.

“The funny part of it was, (my mom) was always telling me throughout the process, she was like, ‘I believe you’re going to end up at the Packers,'” Martinez said on a conference call. “And obviously it was just a lucky guess type of thing, but it’s just funny. My mom said right after, ‘Moms are always right.’ And I’ll take it.”

When his moment arrived, Martinez donned a green Packers hat and matching gray T-shirt, and immediately posted a family photo on social media. His father, Marc, had bought the gear in a pre-draft shopping spree that accumulated gear from all 32 teams — just in case.

Martinez, who stands 6 feet 1 1/2 inches and weighs 240 pounds, earned All-American honors in 2015 and was also named first-team all-Pac-12.

He recorded a team-high 141 tackles last season, and his 10.1 tackles per game led the conference.

The Packers, according to director of football operations Eliot Wolf, were enamored of Martinez’s all-around game. He flashed the ability to blitz, evidenced by 13 1/2 tackles for loss and 6 1/2 sacks over the last two years. He expressed confidence in his ability to cover, and Martinez said he served as the main coverage linebacker in nickel and dime packages last season. His 40-yard dash time of 4.67 seconds is far from blazing, but Wolf said the Packers have no qualms about his mobility or range.

“I felt like this last year I improved tremendously on that,” Martinez said. “I feel 100% confident to go out there and cover whoever I need to cover.”

Oklahoma’s Zack Sanchez was picked in Round 5 by the Carolina Panthers.

The 21-year-old Latino cornerback, picked 141st overall, is a ball-hawk who intercepted 13 passes over the past two seasons. His seven picks in 2015 tied for fifth nationally. Sanchez was not afraid to gamble, and sometimes paid for his mistakes. During his career at Oklahoma, he also recorded 134 tackles and three touchdowns.

“He’s instinctive. I think when you get into the fourth or fifth rounds, and find a cornerback with some instincts, this is a great pick,” said NFL Network’s Mike Mayock.

Thomas Duarte is switching coasts…

The 21-year-old half-Mexican American receiver, who played for UCLA, was picked in the seventh round by the Miami Dolphins.

The 231st pick overall, the 6-foot-2, 231-pound Duarte was drafted as a tight end.

Duarte turned pro with a season of eligibility remaining. He ranked second on the Bruins last season with 53 receptions for 872 yards and a team-best 10 touchdown receptions.

Mendoza Encouraging Latinas to Get in the Game…

Dare to be different! That’s the message Olympic gold medalist Jessica Mendoza is sharing with young Latinas.

The 31-year-old Mexican American softball star—who helped lead the U.S. women’s national softball team to a gold medal at the Athens 2004 games—says young Latinas can differentiate themselves from the rest of the pack by going to college and dedicating their energies to sports.

Jessica Mendoza

“In the Latino community there are many cultural barriers and pre-established roles so that girls remain inside the home and do not devote time to sports,” Mendoza told Efe. “Playing sports, in particular, causes Latinas to have more confidence in themselves, they are a road to education.”

Born in Camarillo, California, the former 4-time First Team All-American softball player, is the granddaughter of Mexican immigrants. She graduated from Stanford University, where she was the school’s Athlete of the Year in 1999, 2000 and 2001.

Along with a gold medal at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Mendoza has helped lead the U.S. women’s softball team two world cups (2006-2007), two world championships (2002 and 2006), two gold medals in the Pan American Games in 2003 and 2007 and a silver medal in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, among others.

Jessica Mendoza

“A problem in the Hispanic community is that many girls and boys are overweight,” said Mendoza, who is a reporter and analyst for ESPN. “So we have to provide the incentive in Latino homes … to get out of the house to play sports.”

Mendoza said that her love of sports started during her childhood because her father coached baseball, but as a Latina she grew up seeing that there were few Latina role models in sports.

“I started playing baseball at 4, but I only played with males and at 8 I began playing softball with other girls, the model to follow was my dad, who is a bilingual coach and on the field would direct one person in English and, at the same time, he’d give tips to another in Spanish,” she recounted.

“My father played a lot in school and because of his talents in sports he was able to study in good schools and do well in all academic areas to be successful in life,” Mendoza said.

Jessica Mendoza

Married to a civil engineer and the mother of a 3-year-old boy, Mendoza also devotes herself to giving motivational talks to young people in U.S. schools and abroad.

“I like to focus myself on seeing how I can help in the Latino community with my words,” she said.

Mendoza said that she knows very well that in the Latino community there is a cycle in which girls begin to have children at an early age and don’t continue their studies at college.

“We new generations of Latinas have to be different and to dare to be the first in the family to think differently about enrolling to study at community colleges or universities,” she said.