Carlos Carrasco Finalizes $47 Million Deal with the Cleveland Indians

It’s a done deal for Carlos Carrasco

The 31-year-old Venezuelan professional baseball pitcher has finalized his $47 million, four-year contract with the Cleveland Indians, dating back to December 6.

Carlos Carrasco

Carrasco’s $14 million club option for 2023 under his new deal with the team would become guaranteed if he pitches 170 or more innings in 2022 and is expected to be healthy for the following season.

Carrasco’s contract includes $37.25 million in new guaranteed money. It keeps his $9.75 million salary this year and calls for $10.25 million in 2020, which had been the option price of his previous deal. The agreement adds salaries of $12 million in 2021 and ’22 plus the new option year.

His 2020 salary would increase by $2 million for a Cy Young Awardthis year, $1 million for finishing second or third in the voting, $750,000 for fourth or fifth, and $500,000 for sixth through 10th, as long as he receives at least two votes.

For the remainder of the contract, salaries could escalate by up to $3 million using the same formula.

He would get a one-time assignment bonus if traded, $3 million if dealt before the end of this season and $1 million if traded after the season.

Carrasco won 35 games over the past two seasons and is a core member of one of baseball’s best rotations, which could change if the Indians trade either two-time Cy Young winner Corey Kluber or MLB All-Star Trevor Bauer.Carrasco went 17-10 with a 3.38 ERA in 30 starts last season for the AL Centralchampions, finishing with a career-high 231 strikeouts as the Indians became the first team to have four pitchers to fan 200 in the same season.

Detroit Tigers Designated Hitter Victor Martinez Registers 2,000th Career Hit

And the hits just keep coming for Victor Martinez

The 38-year-old Venezuelan baseball player, a designated hitter and first baseman for the Detroit Tigers, reached 2,000 career hits on Friday night.

Victor Martinez

Martinez, heard the crowd roar and felt his heart swell, as he picked up the milestone hit on the same field where he began his MLB career, against the franchise that signed him as a teenager out of Venezuela.

Detroit’s switch-hitter singled in the second inning off Cleveland IndiansCarlos Carrasco to reach the plateau. After reaching first base, Martinez received a lengthy standing ovation from the large Cleveland crowd, fans that adored him during his eight seasons with the Indians from 2002-09.

Martinez hugged Detroit first-base coach Omar Vizquel, his teammate in Cleveland and a fellow Venezuelan, before tipping his cap to the crowd. Players on both benches applauded and the game was briefly halted to acknowledge the feat.

“It’s special to have it done here,” Martinez said following the Tigers’ 11-2 loss. “For me, it was even better. Nothing against the Indians, I feel like it’s where everything started for me. I will always remember this day, until I die. What the fans did to me with that ovation. It made me feel so proud and so good that they stand up for me. I just want to let them know too that I will always have the Indians in my heart, always.”

Martinez is the ninth active player to reach 2,000 hits, joining Ichiro Suzuki, Adrian Beltre, Albert Pujols, Carlos Beltran, Miguel Cabrera, Robinson Cano, Matt Holliday and Jose Reyes.

To attain the milestone in Cleveland and with Vizquel, the career hits leader among Venezuelan-born players, at his side made it even more meaningful for Martinez.

“He congratulated me and told me it was awesome, and at the same time, I wasn’t hearing and stuff,” Martinez said. “It was a pretty cool moment.”

Martinez was a three-time All-Star with the Indians, who signed him in 1996. He broke down in tears when Cleveland traded him to the Boston Red Sox at the deadline in 2009 for three pitchers.

And although he’s had a long run with the Tigers, Cleveland will remain dear to Martinez.

“This is my seventh year in Detroit, but this was a place that I called home, and I’m always going to have Cleveland in my heart,” he said. “It was the team that gave me a chance to be a professional baseball player, gave me a chance to become a major leaguer. It’s a pretty special place.”

Martinez, too, is a pretty special hitter.

He entered the season with a .301 career average and the five-time All-Star has been one of the game’s toughest outs from the day he broke into the big leagues.

“There aren’t a lot of people who can say they got 2,000 major league hits,” Tigers manager Brad Ausmus said. “He probably grinded out every single one of those at-bats to get those hits. It’s something he should be proud of.”