Victor Manuelle to Receive Icon Award at This Year’s La Musa Awards

There’s an iconic honor headed Victor Manuelle’s way…

The 49-year-old Puerto Rican salsa singer will be honored by Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame (LSHOF) with the Icon Award during the 2018 La Musa Awards.

Victor Manuelle

The announcement was made by LSHOF founders Desmond Child and Rudy Pérez on behalf of its Board of Directors.

The special award will recognize Manuelle’s career and musical contributionswhich include breaking chart records within the Latin and tropical music space for over two decades.  Previous honorees include Alejandro Sanz and Carlos Vives.

“I have received many awards through the years, but being the recipient of the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame’s Icon Award has a very special significance for me,” said Manuelle in a press statement. “This award not only recognizes the depth and length of my career as a performer and songwriter but also honors all of the creativity that went into writing and producing my music with the world’s most brilliant collaborators, musicians and singers.”

The 6th annual LA Musa Awards, presented by Spotify, will be directed by Richard Jay-Alexander and will take place at the James L. Knight Center in Miami on October 18 and will be hosted by Puerto Rican actor/singer, Ektor Rivera.

The ceremony will honor this year’s class of Inductees: Gloria Trevi (Mexico), Chucho Valdés (Cuba), Carlos Rubira Infante (Ecuador), Fernando Osorio (Venezuela) and other special Honorees.

 

Yuri Among the Latin Recording Academy’s 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award Honorees

Yuri‘s achievements will be celebrated in November…

The Latin Recording Academy has revealed the list of artists who will receive the special awards at the 2018 Latin Grammys, with the 54-year-old Mexican singer, actress and TV host among the Lifetime Achievement Award honorees.

Yuri

Presented to performers who have made unprecedented contributions of outstanding artistic significance to Latin music, this year’s lifetime achievement award goes to seven artists with reputable music careers: Yuri, Erasmo CarlosDyangoAndy Montañez, José María NapoleónChucho Valdés, and Wilfrido Vargas.

Record label executives Horacio Malvicino from Argentina and Tomás Muñozfrom Spain will receive the Trustees Award, which is voted on by The Latin Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees and merited to individuals who have made significant contributions, other than in performance, to music during their careers.

“Our 2018 class has made outstanding contributions benefiting Ibero-American music, providing innovation, and a unique vision in favor of all music lovers,” said Gabriel Abaroa Jr., Latin Recording Academy president/CEO in a press statement.

The honorees will be celebrated during a private ceremony on Nov. 13 in Las Vegas. The 19th Annual Latin Grammys will be broadcast live from 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. ET at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas via Univision.

Here are the lifetime achievement award honorees below.

Yuri
The Mexican singer and actress gained fame across Latin America in the ‘80s. Throughout Yuri’s successful music career, she has sung heartfelt songs in many genres including Latin pop, tropical, rancheras, and Christian.

Erasmo Carlos
Erasmo is a Brazilian singer-songwriter, who besides his remarkable solo career in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s is also known for collaborating with Roberto Carlos.

Dyango
Born Jose Gomez Romero, Dyango is a Spanish musician and singer known as “The Voice of Love” for his romantic ballads released in the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Andy Montañez
Andy Montañez kicked off his solo career in the ‘80s after gaining international success as part of El Gran Combo. Known as “El Godfather de la Salsa,” the Puerto Rican singer is one of the most soulful and creative vocalists in the Afro-Caribbean genre.

José María Napoleón
Known as “El Poeta de la Cancion,” the Mexican singer-songwriter is a gem from the influential romantic ballad movement in the ‘70s. In additional to his solo career, he’s composed songs for Vicente Fernandez, Jose Jose, Pepe Aguilar, and more.

Chucho Valdés
As a Cuban pianist, bandleader, composer, and arranger, Chucho Valdes’ music career spans more than five decades. In the ’70s he founded the group Irakere, which became known as one of the best-known Latin Jazz bands in Cuba.

Wilfrido Vargas
Dominican singer Wilfrido Vargas kicked off his music career in the ‘70s and has since blessed us with timeless merengue songs such as “El Africano,” “El Jardinero,” and “El Baile del Perrito.”

Chucho Valdés to Pay Homage to His Late Father Bebo Valdés at the Voll-Damm Barcelona International Jazz Festival

Chucho Valdés is preparing to honor his late father…

Renowned Cuban pianist Bebo Valdés would’ve turned 100 this coming October. His son, Chucho, of Irakere fame, and Diego El Cigala, the flamenco singer with whom Bebo recorded the remarkable 2003 album Lagrimas Negras, are among the artists who will pay homage to one of Cuba’s most celebrated musicians at this fall’s Voll-Damm Barcelona International Jazz Festival.

Chucho Valdés 

Cigala will honor both Bebo’s centennial and the 15th anniversary of the Grammy-winning album, performing the evergreen boleros and Cuban classics he piercingly inflected with Spanish song on the recording, on which he was accompanied by Bebo’s timeless stylings. The album by the unexpected pair — which reached no. 4 on the Billboard Latin Pop Albums chart — vaulted Cigala to international stages, and was the centerpiece of Bebo’s fabulous late career comeback. He was 84 years old when Lagrimas Negras was released. Bebo died in 2013.

At the just-announced concert on November 14 at Barcelona’s Palau de la Música, Cigala will perform with Jaime Calabuch, known as Jumituson piano. Cigala and Jumitus have also been announced for U.S. concerts at the Fillmore Miami Beach (November 9), and at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex in Los Angeles (March 2019).

Chucho Valdés, who was named the Barcelona Festival’s “godfather” in 2014, will open the festival October 26 with music from his 1972 vanguard Cuban jazz album, Jazz Batá, which was influenced by Bebo’s earlier experiments with the sacred Afro-Cuban batá drums. In 1952 in Havana, Bebo premiered his new rhythm called batangá, featuring the batá, which at that time had yet to make the jump from their hallowed place in religious ceremonies to popular music stages. The combination of ritual rhythms and Cuban orchestral arrangements was before its time.

Chucho will perform with a group of next-generation musicians: Yaroldi Abreu y Dreiser Durruthy Bambolé and Yelsy Heredia, whose playing carries on the innovation characterized by both Chucho and Bebo throughout their careers.

Chucho and his band will also perform Jazz Batá in other European cities this fall, and on a jazz cruise from Ft. Lauderdale scheduled for January 2019.

Bassist Javier Colina, who recorded a live album with Bebo at New York’s Village Vanguard in 2005, and Cuban pianist Harold Lopez Nussa, are also part of the jazz festival’s Bebo Valdés tribute, which is a piece of the extensive program of the festival’s 50th anniversary edition. Flamenco guitarist Tomatito, Brazil’s Tribalistas, bassist Avishai Cohen, Malian music duo Amadou & Mariam, jazz singer Madeleine Peyroux, the John Scofield Combo, the Bad Plus and Grupo Compay Segundo are among artists on the event’s October-December concert schedule.

Gloria Trevi to be Inducted into the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame

Gloria Trevi is heading into the annals of Latin music history…

The Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame has revealed which five songwriters will be inducted at the prestigious hall this year, with the 50-year-old Mexican singer/songwriter making the grade.

Gloria Trevi

Trevi joins a roster that includes previous inductees, including last year’s Erika Ender, Carlos Vives and Ana Gabriel, to name a few.

Besides having a rebellious and over-the-top personality onstage, Trevi is also known as a songwriter and philanthropist. In her nearly three-decade music career, she’s penned more than 400 songs and released 13 albums, four of which reached No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart: Gloria in 2011, El Amor in 2015, Immortal in 2016 and Versus in 2017.

Joining Trevi is Chucho Valdés.

As a pianist, composer and arranger, the 76-year-old Cuban artist become one of the most influential figures in modern Afro-Cuban jazz. He’s a winner of six Grammys and three Latin Grammys. On November 27, 2010, Chucho peaked at No. 8 on the Latin Pop Albumschart thanks to his collaboration with Buika on her album El Ultimo Trago.

Ecuadorian singer and songwriter Carlos Rubira Infante has also made the list. He’s known for bringing to the forefront the country’s national music style, pasillo and pasacalle music. At 96 years old, he was awarded the National Prize in ArtPremio Eugenio Espejo” in 2008 from the president of Ecuador and has penned more than 400 songs.

Another honoree, Fernando Osorio.

Born in Colombia but raised in Venezuela, this singer-songwriter is the man behind some of the most unforgettable Latin songs. His first international success was with “Solo con un Beso,” a song he wrote for Ricardo Montaner in 1988, peaking at No. 7 on the Hot Latin Songs chart. Osorio nabbed the Latin Grammy for best tropical song in 2004 for composing Celia Cruz‘s “Rie y Llora” before her death.

And last but not least… KC Porter will be honored.

Bon Jovi, Janet Jackson and Laura Pausini all have one thing in common: KC Porter. The American record producer, songwriter, musician and singer is known for crossing over many artists into the Spanish-speaking market. He’s a nine-time Grammy winner for his production work on Carlos Santana‘s Supernatural and has written and produced some of Ricky Martin’s biggest hits, including “María.”

For the past six years, the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame, founded by Desmond Child and Rudy Pérez, has honored the world’s greatest Latin music creators and their memorable songs.

The 2018 honorees will be officially inducted at the sixth annual La Musa Awards ceremony and gala, taking place October 18 at the James L. Knight Center in Miami.

Cosculluela’s “Esteban” to Open Havana Film Festival New York

Jonal Cosculluela is bringing Cuba’s Billy Elliot to the Big Apple

The Cuban director’s first feature film Esteban will have its U.S. debut as the opening film at the Havana Film Festival New York, with Cosculluela taking part in a Q&A session after the screening.

 Jonal Cosculluela's Esteban

Esteban features a soundtrack by Cuban piano godfather Chucho Valdés and a heart-melting nine-year-old protagonist. The story centers on a little boy set on playing the piano against all odds. It’s heralded as a Cuban Billy Elliot with a love-at-first sight star, Reynaldo Guanche.

Co-produced by the Cuban Institute of Music and Spain’s RTV CommercialEsteban has already won a handful of awards at festivals in Europe and Cuba.

“Chucho Valdés agreed to make the original soundtrack for the film just because he believed in the project,” Cosculluela said via a director’s note on the film’s website. He calls Esteban a story about “the determination of achieving your dreams,” but also one that shows “the harsh side of the current situation in Cuba.”

Several documentaries in the festival lineup delve into specific styles of Cuban music. Amparame!, directed by Patricia Ramos, covers the fertile subject of Cuban music’s relationship with religion. Decir Con Feeling, directed by Rebeca Chávez, is a love letter to filin, the mid-century Havana swinging jazz ballad style.

And Valdés, along with Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Michel Camilo, anchors Pavel Giroud and JuanMa Villar Betancort’s tribute to composer Ernesto LecuonaPlaying Lecuona.

Jesse & Joy Claim Their First-Ever Grammy Award

It’s a special first for Jesse & Joy

The Mexican duo, comprised of Jesse Huerta and his sister Joy Huerta, picked up their first ever gramophone at Sunday’s Grammy Awards show.

Jesse & Joy

Jesse & Joy, six-time Latin Grammy winners, including four in 2012, took home the award for Best Latin Pop Album for their critically acclaimed album Un Besito Mas, which won Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album at last year’s Latin Grammys.

The siblings beat out strong studio efforts from Gaby Moreno, Laura Pausini, Sanalejo and Diego Torres for their first Grammy.

Kirstie Maldonado is now a three-time Grammy winner.

The 24-year-old half-Mexican, part Spanish-American singer and her fellow Pentatonix members won a gramophone Sunday night in anew category.

Pentatonix and Dolly Parton took home the Grammy for Best Country Duo/Group Performance for their remix of Parton’s iconic hit “Jolene.”

The five-member a cappella group had previously won back-to-back Grammys in the Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella category in 2015 and 2016.

Chucho Valdés has earned the sixth gramophone of his career, and his first since 2009.

The 75-year-old Cuban pianist, bandleader, composer and arranger, whose career spans over 50 years, picked up the Grammy for Best Latin Jazz Album for his latest work, Tribute To Irakere: Live In Marciac.

Vicente Fernández has won his third career Grammy…

The 76-year-old Mexican singer, nicknamed “El Rey de la Música Ranchera,” won the Best Regional Mexican Music Album (including Tejano) Grammy for his album Un Azteca En El Azteca, Vol. 1 (En Vivo).

The first time’s the charm for Ile

The 27-year-old Puerto Rican singer, composer, and vocalist, who was nominated for a Latin Grammy for Best New Artist, took home her first Grammy for Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album for her first solo album iLevitable, which was released in June 2016. 

For 10 years, Ile, whose real name is Ileana Mercedes Cabra Joglar, was the sole female singer of Calle 13, performing along with her brothers René Pérez Joglar (“Residente“) and Eduardo Cabra Joglar (“Visitante“).

The late Jose Lugo and his band Guasábara Combo won the Grammy for Best Tropical Latin Album for Donde Están?

Lugo died last June at the age of 56 after a long battle with cancer.

Giancarlo Guerrero proved to be the big winner of the night, picking up three Grammys.

The 47-year-old Costa Rican conductor, the music director of the Nashville Symphony, took home the awards for Best Classical Instrumental Solo, Best Classical Compendium and Best Contemporary Classical Composition for his work on the Nashville Symphony’s Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway project.

Here’s a look at the winners at the 59th annual Grammy Awards:

GENERAL FIELD

Album Of The Year25 — Adele

Record Of The Year“Hello” — Adele

Song Of The Year“Hello” — Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele)

Best New ArtistChance The Rapper

POP FIELD

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance“Stressed Out” — Twenty One Pilots

Best Pop Vocal Album25 — Adele

Best Pop Solo Performance“Hello” — Adele

Best Traditional Pop Vocal AlbumSummertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin — Willie Nelson

DANCE/ELECTRONIC MUSIC FIELD

Best Dance Recording“Don’t Let Me Down” — The Chainsmokers featuring Daya

Best Dance/Electronic AlbumSkin — Flume

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC FIELD

Best Contemporary Instrumental AlbumCulcha Vulcha  — Snarky Puppy

ROCK FIELD

Best Rock Song“Blackstar” — David Bowie, songwriter (David Bowie)

Best Rock Performance“Blackstar” — David Bowie

Best Metal Performance“Dystopia” — Megadeth

Best Rock AlbumTell Me I’m Pretty — Cage The Elephant

ALTERNATIVE FIELD

Best Alternative Music AlbumBlackstar — David Bowie

R&B FIELD

Best Urban Contemporary AlbumLemonade — Beyoncé

Best R&B Performance“Cranes in the Sky” — Solange

Best Traditional R&B Performance“Angel” — Lalah Hathaway

Best R&B Song“Lake By the Ocean” — Hod David & Musze, songwriters (Maxwell)

Best R&B AlbumLalah Hathaway Live — Lalah Hathaway

RAP FIELD

Best Rap AlbumColoring Book — Chance The Rapper

Best Rap Performance“No Problem” — Chance the Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz

Best Rap/Sung Performance“Hotline Bling” — Drake

Best Rap Song“Hotline Bling” — Aubrey Graham & Paul Jefferies, songwriters (Drake)

COUNTRY FIELD

Best Country Solo Performance“My Church” — Maren Morris

Best Country Duo/Group Performance“Jolene” — Pentatonix Featuring Dolly Parton

Best Country Song“Humble and Kind” — Lori McKenna, songwriter (Tim McGraw)

Best Country AlbumA Sailor’s Guide to Earth — Sturgill Simpson

NEW AGE FIELD

Best New Age AlbumWhite Sun II — White Sun

JAZZ FIELD

Best Improvised Jazz Solo“I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” — John Scofield, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal AlbumTake Me To The Alley — Gregory Porter 

Best Jazz Instrumental AlbumCountry for Old Men — John Scofield

Best Large Jazz Ensemble AlbumPresidential Suite: Eight Variations on Freedom — Ted Nash Big Band

Best Latin Jazz AlbumTribute To Irakere: Live In Marciac — Chucho Valdés

GOSPEL/CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC FIELD

Best Gospel Performance/Song“God Provides” — Tamela Mann; Kirk Franklin, songwriter

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song“Thy Will” — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family; Bernie Herms, Hillary Scott & Emily Weisband, songwriters Track from: Love Remains

Best Gospel AlbumLosing My Religion — Kirk Franklin

Best Contemporary Christian Music AlbumLove Remains — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family   

Best Roots Gospel AlbumHymns — Joey+Rory

LATIN FIELD

Best Latin Pop AlbumUn Besito Mas — Jesse & Joy

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative AlbumiLevitable — ile

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)Un Azteca En El Azteca, Vol. 1 (En Vivo) — Vicente Fernández

Best Tropical Latin AlbumDonde Están? — Jose Lugo & Guasábara Combo

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC FIELD

Best American Roots Performance“House of Mercy” — Sarah Jarosz

Best American Roots Song“Kid Sister” — Vince Gill, songwriter (The Time Jumpers)

Best Americana AlbumThis Is Where I Live — William Bell

Best Bluegrass AlbumComing Home — O’Connor Band With Mark O’Connor

Best Traditional Blues AlbumPorcupine Meat — Bobby Rush

Best Contemporary Blues AlbumThe Last Days of Oakland — Fantastic Negrito

Best Folk AlbumUndercurrent — Sarah Jarosz

Best Regional Roots Music AlbumE Walea — Kalani Pe’a

REGGAE FIELD

Best Reggae AlbumZiggy Marley — Ziggy Marley

WORLD MUSIC FIELD

Best World Music AlbumSing Me Home — Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble

CHILDREN’S FIELD

Best Children’s AlbumInfinity Plus One — Secret Agent 23 Skidoo

SPOKEN WORD FIELD

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling)In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox — Carol Burnett

COMEDY FIELD

Best Comedy AlbumTalking for Clapping — Patton Oswalt

MUSICAL THEATER

Best Musical Theater AlbumThe Color Purple — Cynthia Erivo & Jennifer Hudson, principal soloists; Stephen Bray, Van Dean, Frank Filipetti, Roy Furman, Scott Sanders & Jhett Tolentino, producers (Stephen Bray, Brenda Russell & Allee Willis, composers/lyricists) (New Broadway Cast)

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA FIELD

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual MediaMiles Ahead — Miles Davis & Various Artists

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual MediaStar Wars: The Force Awakens — John Williams, composer

Best Song Written For Visual Media: “Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — Max Martin, Shellback & Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel, Walt Dohrn, Ron Funches, Caroline Hjelt, Aino Jawo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse & Kunal Nayyar), Track from: Trolls

COMPOSING/ARRANGING FIELD

Best Instrumental Composition“Spoken At Midnight” — Ted Nash, composer (Ted Nash Big Band)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella“You and I” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals“Flintstones” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

PACKAGE FIELD

Best Recording PackageBlackstar — Jonathan Barnbrook, art director (David Bowie)

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition PackageEdith Piaf 1915-2015 — Gérard Lo Monaco, art director (Edith Piaf)

NOTES FIELD

Best Album NotesSissle And Blake Sing Shuffle Along — Ken Bloom & Richard Carlin, album notes writers (Eubie Blake & Noble Sissle)

HISTORICAL FIELD

Best Historical AlbumThe Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 12 (Collector’s Edition) — Steve Berkowitz & Jeff Rosen, compilation producers; Mark Wilder, mastering engineer (Bob Dylan)

PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL FIELD

Best Engineered Album, Non-ClassicalBlackstar — David Bowie, Tom Elmhirst, Kevin Killen, Tony Visconti & Joe LaPorta (David Bowie)

Producer Of The YearNon-ClassicalGreg Kurstin

Best Remixed Recording“Tearing Me Up (RAC Remix)” — André Allen Anjos, remixer (Bob Moses)

SURROUND SOUND FIELD

Best Surround Sound AlbumDutilleux: Sur La Mêe Accord; Les Citations; Mystère De L’Instant & Timbres, Espace, Mouvement — Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, surround mix engineers; Dmitriy Lipay, surround mastering engineer; Dmitriy Lipay, surround producer (Ludovic Morlot & Seattle Symphony)

PRODUCTION, CLASSICAL FIELD

Best Engineered Album, ClassicalCorigliano: The Ghosts Of Versailles — Mark Donahue & Fred Vogler, engineers (James Conlon, Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette, Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra)

Producer of the Year, ClassicalDavid Frost

CLASSICAL FIELD

Best Orchestral FieldShostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9 — Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera RecordingCorigliano: The Ghosts Of Versailles — James Conlon, conductor; Joshua Guerrero, Christopher Maltman, Lucas Meachem, Patricia Racette, Lucy Schaufer & Guanqun Yu; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (LA Opera Orchestra; LA Opera Chorus)

Best Choral PerformancePenderecki Conducts Penderecki, Volume 1 — Krzystof Penderecki, conductor; Henryk Wojnarowski, choir director (Nikolay Didenko, Agnieszka Rehlis & Johanna Rusanen; Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra; Warsaw Philharmonic Choir)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble PerformanceSteve Reich — Third Coast Percussion

Best Classical Instrumental SoloDaugherty: Tales Of Hemingway — Zuill Bailey; Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (Nashville Symphony)

Best Classical Solo Vocal AlbumShakespeare Songs — Ian Bostridge; Antonio Pappano, accompanist (Michael Collins, Elizabeth Kenny, Lawrence Power & Adam Walker)

Best Classical CompendiumDaugherty: Tales Of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical CompositionDaugherty: Tales Of Hemingway — Michael Daugherty, composer (Zuill Bailey, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM FIELD

Best Music Video“Formation” — Beyoncé

Best Music FilmThe Beatles: Eight Days A Week The Touring Years — (The Beatles)