Claudia Brant Returning to Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Claudia Brant’s music will have a broader audience…

The 51-year-old Argentine singer-songwriter has signed a global publishing administration agreement with Sony/ATV Music Publishing.

Claudia Brant

Brant, whose credits include Luis Fonsi’s “No me doy por vencido” and Ricky Martin’s “Lo mejor de mi vida eres tu,” is one of a few prominent female songwriters in Latin music.

She returns to Sony/ATV after a stint at Universal Music Publishing Group.

“With over two thousand songs recorded, multiple awards, and 30 years of my life dedicated to songwriting, it’s clear to me now that Sony/ATV is where I belong,” said Brant in a statement.  “It is my honor to be a part of this publishing powerhouse where songwriters are not only heard and understood but respected and taken care of. I am looking forward to getting back to work with my friend Jorge Mejia, whose hard work and dedication has greatly impacted my career. Moreover, I am thrilled to find new opportunities for my music under the guidance of the amazing Jon Platt and his team, both in the United States as well as internationally. I’m so glad to finally be back home.”

Brant has songwriting credits with many of Latin music’s biggest stars and beyond, including Camila CabelloFifth HarmonyReikIl Volo and CNCO

She was also inducted into the Latin Songwriter’s Hall of Famein 2016 and is a National Trustee board member for The Recording Academy. She won a Grammy award for Best Latin Pop Album in 2019.

Her deal with Sony/ATV encompasses her prior catalog with the publisher.

Most recently, she created “Canción de Autor Oficial,” a non-profit whose aim is to promote songwriters’ craft and rights. The organization teamed up with MusiCares for a live event concert series to raise money for the COVID-19 relief fund.

Jorge Mejia, Sony/ATV president and CEO for Latin America and US Latin said in a statement: “I have known and worked with Claudia for years, and I couldn’t admire her more for the uncommon dedication, commitment, and respect she brings to her craft. She is the consummate songwriter (not to mention mother, artist, songwriter advocate, the list goes on). Sony/ATV is lucky to be able to welcome her back home.”

Cardi B Makes Rap History While Winning First-Ever Grammy Award

It’s official! Cardi Bis a Grammy winner…

The 26-year-old half-Dominican American rap sensation, a five-time nominee at this year’s Grammy Awards show, didn’t leave empty-handed.

Cardi B

Cardi B took home the award for Best Rap Album for chart-topping debut album Invasion of Privacy, becoming the first woman to win the prize.

50-year-old Argentine Singer/songwriter Claudia Brant, who has built a career as one of the top songwriters in Latin music, won as a performer in the Best Latin Pop Albumcategory for Sincera, a collection of personal, heartfelt songs set to acoustic, Brazilian-tinged arrangements, courtesy of producers/engineers Cheche Alaraand Moogie Canazio. 

The Best Latin Rock/Alternative/Urban Albumwent to Mexican band Zoé’s Aztlan in a hard to predict category where the alternative sounds of Monsiuer Perinéand the urban sounds of Orishas also stood a good chance of winning. 

There were no big commercial releases in the Best Tropical Albumcategory, which went to critically acclaimed Spanish Harlem Orchestrafor Anniversary

The only fully expected win was Luis Miguel’s, for his Latin Grammywinning ¡México Por Siempre!

Earlier in the evening, Lucy Kalantari, who won Best Children’s Albumfor All The Sounds by Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats, gave a shout out to her mom in Dominican Republic.

“This album was recorded by a Latina woman. It was produced by a woman,” she said.

Here are the artists, albums and songs that received awards.

Record of the Year
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Album of the Year
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Song of the Year
“This Is America” — Donald Glover and Ludwig Goransson, songwriters (Childish Gambino)

Best New Artist
Dua Lipa

Best Pop Solo Performance
“Joanne (Where Do You Think You’re Goin’?)” — Lady Gaga

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Best Pop Vocal Album
“Sweetener” — Ariana Grande

Best Rock Performance
“When Bad Does Good” — Chris Cornell

Best Rock Song
“Masseduction” — Jack Antonoff and Annie Clark, songwriters (St. Vincent)

Best Rock Album
“From the Fires” — Greta Van Fleet

Best Alternative Music Album
“Colors” — Beck

Best R&B Performance
“Best Part” — H.E.R. featuring Daniel Caesar

Best Urban Contemporary Album
“Everything Is Love” — The Carters

Best R&B Album
“H.E.R.” — H.E.R.

Best Rap Performance
“King’s Dead” — Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future and James Blake and “Bubblin” — Anderson .Paak

Best Rap Song
“God’s Plan” — Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Brock Korsan, Ron LaTour, Matthew Samuels and Noah Shebib, songwriters (Drake)

Best Rap Album
“Invasion of Privacy” — Cardi B

Best Country Solo Performance
“Butterflies” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Country Album
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Jazz Instrumental Album
“Emanon” — The Wayne Shorter Quartet

Best Latin Pop Album
“Sincera” — Claudia Brant

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album
“Aztlán” — Zoé

Best Americana Album
“By the Way, I Forgive You” — Brandi Carlile

Best Song Written for Visual Media
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando and Andrew Wyatt, songwriters (Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Pharrell Williams

Best Music Video
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Best Comedy Album
“Equanimity & the Bird Revelation” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album
“The Band’s Visit” — Etai Benson, Adam Kantor, Katrina Lenk and Ari’el Stachel, principal soloists; Dean Sharenow and David Yazbek, producers; David Yazbek, composer and lyricist

Best Instrumental Composition
“Blut Und Boden (Blood and Soil)” — Terence Blanchard

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella
“Stars and Stripes Forever” — John Daversa

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals
“Spiderman Theme” — Mark Kibble, Randy Waldman and Justin Wilson, arrangers

Best Recording Package
“Masseduction” — Willo Perron, art director

Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package
“Squeeze Box: The Complete Works of ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic” — Meghan Foley, Annie Stoll and Al Yankovic, art directors

Best Album Notes
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — David Evans, album notes writer

Best Historical Album
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — William Ferris, April Ledbetter and Steven Lance Ledbetter, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
“Colors” — Julian Burg, Serban Ghenea, David “Elevator” Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin, Florian Lagatta, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco, Jesse Shatkin, Darrell Thorp and Cassidy Turbin, engineers; Chris Bellman, Tom Coyne, Emily Lazar and Randy Merrill, mastering engineers

Best Remixed Recording
“Walking Away (Mura Masa remix)” — Alex Crossan, remixer

Best Immersive Audio Album
“Eye in the Sky – 35th Anniversary Edition” — Alan Parsons, surround mix engineer; Dave Donnelly, P.J. Olsson and Alan Parsons, surround mastering engineers; Alan Parsons, surround producer

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album
“Steve Gadd Band” — Steve Gadd

Band Best Gospel Performance/Song
“Never Alone” — Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin and Victoria Kelly, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“You Say” — Lauren Daigle; Lauren Daigle, Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, songwriters

Best Gospel Album
“Hiding Place” — Tori Kelly

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
“Look Up Child” — Lauren Daigle

Best Roots Gospel Album
“Unexpected” — Jason Crabb

Best World Music Album
“Freedom” — Soweto Gospel Choir

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media
“The Greatest Showman” — Hugh Jackman (and Various Artists); Alex Lacamoire, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul and Greg Wells, compilation producers

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
“Black Panther” — Ludwig Göransson, composer

Best New Age Album
 “Opium Moon” — Opium Moon

Best American Roots Performance
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile

Best American Roots Song
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile, Dave Cobb, Phil Hanseroth and Tim Hanseroth, songwriters

Best Bluegrass Album
“The Travelin’ Mccourys” — The Travelin’ Mccourys

Best Traditional Blues Album
“The Blues Is Alive and Well” — Buddy Guy

Best Contemporary Blues Album
“Please Don’t Be Dead” — Fantastic Negrito

Best Folk Album
“All Ashore” — Punch Brothers

Best Children’s Album
“All the Sounds” — Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling)
“Faith – A Journey for All” — Jimmy Carter

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)
“¡México Por Siempre!” — Luis Miguel

Best Tropical Latin Album
“Anniversary” — Spanish Harlem Orchestra

Best Regional Roots Music Album
“No ‘Ane’i” — Kalani Pe’a

Best Music Film
“Quincy” — Quincy Jones; Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones, video directors; Paula Dupré Pesmen, video producer

Best Country Duo/Group Performance
“Tequila” — Dan + Shay

Best Country Song
“Space Cowboy” — Luke Laird, Shane Mcanally and Kacey Musgraves, songwriters

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album
“My Way” — Willie Nelson

Best Engineered Album, Classical
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Shawn Murphy and Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer

Producer of the Year, Classical
Blanton Alspaugh

Best Orchestral Performance
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Andris Nelsons, conductor

Best Opera Recording
“Bates: The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs” — Michael Christie, conductor; Sasha Cooke, Jessica E. Jones, Edward Parks, Garrett Sorenson and Wei Wu; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer

Best Choral Performance
“Mcloskey: Zealot Canticles” — Donald Nally, conductor

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance
“Anderson, Laurie: Landfall” — Laurie Anderson and Kronos Quartet

Best Classical Instrumental Solo
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — James Ehnes; Ludovic Morlot, conductor

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album
“Songs of Orpheus – Monteverdi, Caccini, D’india & Landi” — Karim Sulayman; Jeannette Sorrell, conductor; Apollo’s Fire, ensembles

Best Classical Compendium
“Fuchs: Piano Concerto ‘spiritualist’; Poems of Life; Glacier; Rush” — Joann Falletta, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — Aaron Jay Kernis, composer

Best Dance Recording
“Electricity” — Silk City and Dua Lipa featuring Diplo and Mark Ronson

Best Dance/Electronic Album
“Woman Worldwide” — Justice

Best Reggae Album
“44/876” — Sting and Shaggy

Best Improvised Jazz Solo
“Don’t Fence Me In” — John Daversa, soloist. Track from: “American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom”

Best Jazz Vocal Album
“The Window” — Cécile Mclorin Salvant

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album
“American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom” — John Daversa Big Band featuring DACA Artists

Best Latin Jazz Album
“Back to the Sunset” — Dafnis Prieto Big Band

Best Traditional R&B Performance
“Bet Ain’t Worth the Hand” — Leon Bridges and “How Deep Is Your Love” — PJ Morton featuring Yebba

Best R&B Song
“Boo’d Up” — Larrance Dopson, Joelle James, Ella Mai and Dijon Mcfarlane, songwriters

Best Metal Performance
“Electric Messiah” — High on Fire

Best Rap/Sung Performance
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Victoria La Mala Releases Immigrant Rights-Themed Charity Single “Corazon Valiente”

Victoria La Mala is raising her voice to raise awareness for the plight of migrant families separated at the border…

The Mexican singer, an up and coming regional Mexican singer/songwriter signed to Roc Nation Latin, not only marched in support of reuniting families last month.

Victoria La Mala

She also wrote “Corazón Valiente” with Claudia Brant in the wake of the government’s decision to rescind DACA.

“You risked so much searching for a dream, how can they tear it away like that?” La Mala asks in her song, inspired in part by her own immigration experience when she moved from Mexico to the U.S. at eighteen years old.

“All of us come here looking for a better life, a dream, and it’s terrible to be treated like possible criminals,” she tells Billboard. “In my family, many who came without papers have gone on to become doctors, attorneys, even mayors of their towns. This is an issue of humanity, not politics.”

In tandem with the song’s release, La Mala has launched a Facebook fundraising campaign called “Corazon Valiente” to raise money for the RAICES Foundation, a nonprofit providing legal services to immigrant children, families and refugees.

The song, produced by Brant and Ezequiel “Cheche” Alara, has been released on Roc Nation.

Venegas to Receive Special Award at This Year’s La Musa Awards

Julieta Venegas is the ultimate musa

The 45-year-old Mexican singer is set to receive the special La Musa Elena Casals award at this year’s La Musa Awards during the October 13 ceremony.

Julieta Venegas

Venegas will receive the prize named after the Cuban poet and singer/songwriter, which recognizes young musicians who have an outstanding career in contemporary Latin music.

“Julieta Venegas is one of the most influential voices in Latin music and we are absolutely thrilled to give her this award,” said Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame co-founder Desmond Child in a statement.

“Venegas makes everyone in the Latin music industry proud. She is a true artist who inspires and moves. Her music has captivated all generations,” added fellow LSHOF co-founder Rudy Pérez.

The Grammy and Latin Grammy award-winning artist is known for her hit singles like “Limón y sal,” “Andar conmigo,” “Lento,” “Algo sucede,” among others.

The fourth annual La Musa Awards will take place in Miami where urban superstar Yandel will be given the Premio Triunfador honor and six Latin artists — Los Temerarios, Robi Draco Rosa, Cheo Zorrilla, Miguel Luna, Claudia Brant and Alejandro Jaen — will be inducted into the hall of fame and honored with the silver La Musa trophy statuette.

Anthony Receives ASCAP’s Founders Award

He’s the top selling tropical salsa artist of all time… And, now Marc Anthony is being celebrated for his songwriting talents…

The 43-year-old Puerto Rican singer-songwriter, a two-time Grammy award winner, received ASCAP’s Founders Award at the 20th annual ASCAP Latin Music Awards.

Marc Anthony & David Beckham

Anthony received the award from ASCAP president and chairman Paul Williams and soccer star David Beckham during a music-filled night that honored the songwriters and publishers of ASCAP’s most performed Latin music songs in 2011.

“When I left home today I felt handsome, and then they stand me next to this,” Anthony said with a laugh when he picked up his award, pointing to Beckham, a good friend. “This award goes to my team,” he added on a more serious note. “I’m not an island. It’s all about the love of music and the fight for music.”

The evening included performances of Anthony’s songs by Victor Manuelle, Pia Toscano, La Mafia and Natalia Jimenez.

Past recipients of the Founders Award include Rod Stewart, Annie Lenox, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney and Ruben Blades.

Described as a “renaissance man,” Anthony also shared the best pop song award with Cuban American rap superstar Pitbull for their collaboration, “Rain Over Me.”

The Songwriter of the Year award was given jointly to Claudia Brant and Anthony “Romeo” Santos. Meanwhile, the Latin song of the year award went to “Di Que Regresarás,” written by Carlos M. Ferraresi Ferra“, and recorded by regional Mexican band La Original Banda El Limón.

Awards were also presented in the Pop, Tropical, Regional Mexican, Urban and Television categories.