Natalia LaFourcade Among the Top Winners at This Year’s Latin Grammys

Natalia LaFourcade has her hands full…

The 36-year-old Mexican singer-songwriter proved to be one of the night’s big winners at the Latin Grammys awards show, taking home three prizes, including one of the top awards.

Natalia Lafourcade

LaFourcade, a Grammy and Latin Grammy darling, was nevertheless a surprise winner in the Album of the Year category with her Un Canto Por México, Vol. 1, a collection of songs dedicated to Mexico and arranged in traditional style.

LaFourcade also won best regional song for “Mi Religión” and best alternative song for “En Cantos,” alongside Ile and co-written with Ismael Cancel.

LaFourcade now raises her total of Latin Grammy wins to 14 after winning in every category she was nominated this year.

But she wasn’t the only top winner of the night…

Rosalía also took home three awards.

The 27-year-old Spanish singer won those awards due to two collaborations. “Yo x Ti Tu x Mi,” with Puerto Rican star Ozuna, won best urban fusion performance and best urban song, leading also to two Latin Grammy wins for Ozuna and one for Rosalía’s collaborator, El Guincho. And “TKN,” her collaboration with Travis Scott, won best short form video (directed by Nicolás Méndez, aka CANADA). She’s now an 8-time Latin Grammy winner.

Carlos Vives also claimed three awards.

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter’s “Canción para Rubén,” alongside Ruben Blades, won best tropical song while his album Cumbiana won best contemporary/tropical fusion album and the documentary El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana won best long form video.

J Balvin, the top nominee of the evening, won the very competitive best urban album category for Colores, while Bad Bunny’s provocative “Yo Perreo Sola” won best reggaeton performance. The new category was one of the nods the Latin Recording Academy made this year toward appeasing a contingent of urban artists who felt neglected by the Latin Grammys.

The coveted record of the year award went to Alejandro Sanz’s “Contigo,” while song of the year went to Residente for his biographical beauty “René.”

In a surprise win, Mike Bahía took home the best new artist award, beating out some heavy competition, including Anuel AA, Nicky Nicole, Rauw Alejandro and Nathy Peluso.

“No, I didn’t expect this award,” he said backstage. “I’ve had beautiful career moments where awards, let’s say, haven’t really been with me. I didn’t think this would be the exception. But things happen for a reason, and I want to thank my colleagues for validating my work.”

Here’s the full winners list:

GENERAL FIELD:

Record Of The Year: “Contigo” — Alejandro Sanz
Album Of The Year: Un Canto Por México, Vol. 1 — Natalia Lafourcade
Song Of The Year: “René” — Residente, songwriter (Residente)
Best New Artist:
Mike Bahía
Best Pop Vocal Album
: Pausa — Ricky Martin
Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Compadres – Andrés Cepeda & Fonseca
Best Pop Song: “TuTu” – Camilo, Jon Leone & Richi López, songwriters (Camilo & Pedro Capó)
Best Urban Fusion/Performance: “Yo x Ti Tu x Mi” – Rosalía & Ozuna
Best Reggaeton Performance: “Yo Perreo Sola” — Bad Bunny
Best Urban Music Album:
Colores – J Balvin
Best Rap/Hip Hop Song:
“Antes Que El Mundo Se Acabe” – Residente, songwriter (Residente)
Best Urban Song: “Yo x Ti, Tu x Mi” – Pablo Diaz-Reixa “El Guincho”, Ozuna & Rosalía, songwriters (Rosalía & Ozuna)
Best Rock Album: “Dónde Jugarán Lxs Niñxs? – Molotov
Best Rock Song: “Biutiful” – Mon Laferte, songwriter (Mon Laferte)
Best Pop/Rock Album:
La Conquista del Espacio – Fito Paez
Best Pop/Rock Song: “La Canción de las Bestias” – Fito Páez, songwriter (Fito Páez)
Best Alternative Music Album: Sobrevolando – Cultura Profética
Best Alternative Song: “En Cantos” – Ismael Cancel, Ile & Natalia Lafourcade, songwriters (Ile & Natalia Lafourcade)
Best Salsa Album: 40 – Grupo Niche
Best Cumbia/Vallenato Album: Sigo Cantando Al Amor (Deluxe) – Jorge Celedón & Sergio Luis Rodríguez
Best Merengue/Bachata Album: Ahora – Eddy Herrera &
Larimar – Daniel Santacruz (Tie)
Best Traditional Tropical Album: Ícono – Orquesta Aragón
Best Contemporary/Tropical Fusion Album: Cumbiana — Carlos Vives
Best Tropical Song: “Canción Para Rubén” – Rubén Blades & Carlos Vives, songwriters (Carlos Vives & Rubén Blades)
Best Singer-Songwriter Album:
Mesa Para Dos – Kany García
Best Ranchero/Mariachi Album: Hecho en México — Alejandro Fernández Best Banda Album: Playlist – Chiquis
Best Tejano Album: Live In México – La Mafia
Best Norteño Album
: Los Tigres del Norte At Folsom Prison – Los Tigres del Norte
Best Regional Song: “Mi Religión” – Natalia Lafourcade, songwriter (Natalia Lafourcade)
Best Instrumental Album: Terra – Daniel Minimalia
Best Folk Album: A Capella – Susana Baca
Best Tango Album: Fuelle y Cuerda – Gustavo Casenave
Best Flamenco Album: Flamenco Son Fronteras – Antonio Rey
Best Latin Jazz/Jazz Album:
Puertos: Music from International Waters – Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra
Best Christian Album (Spanish Language): Soldados – Alex Campos
Best Portuguese Language Christian Album: Reino – Aline Barros
Best Portuguese Language Contemporary Pop Album: Apká! – Céu —
Best Portuguese Language Rock or Alternative Album: Amarelo – Emicida Best Samba/Pagode Album: Samba Jazz De Raiz, Claudio Jorge 70 – Cláudio Jorge
Best MPB (Musica Popular Brasileira) Album: Belo Horizonte – Toninho Horta & Orquestra Fantasma
Best Sertaneja Music Album: Origens [Ao Vivo Em Sete Lagoas, Brazil / 2019] – Paula Fernandes
Best Portuguese Language Roots Album: Veia Nordestina – Mariana Aydar — Best Portuguese Language Song: “Abricó-De-Macaco” — Francisco Bosco & João Bosco, songwriters (João Bosco)
Best Latin Children’s Album: Canta y Juega – Tina Kids
Best Classical Album: Eternal Gratitude – Paulina Leisring & Domingo Pagliuca; Samuel Pilafian, album producer
Best Classical Contemporary Composition
: “Sacre” – Carlos Fernando López & José Valentino, composers (Carlos Fernando López)
Best Arrangement: “La Flor de la Canela” – Lorenzo Ferrero, arranger (Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra)
Best Recording Package: Soy Puro Teatro – Homenaje a La Lupe – Pedro Fajardo, art director (Mariaca Semprún)
Best Engineered Album: 3:33 – Daniel Bitrán Arizpe, Daniel Dávila, Justin Moshkevich, George Noriega, Erick Roman, Paul Rubinstein & JC Vertti, engineers; Miles Comaskey, Najeeb Jones & Tony Maserati, mixers; Dale Becker, mastering engineer (Debi Nova)
Producer of the Year: Andrés Torres, Mauricio Rengifo
Best Short Form Music Video: “TKN” – Rosalía & Travis Scott / Nicolás Méndez aka CANADA, video director; Oscar Romagosa & Laura Serra Estorch, video producers
Best Long Form Music Video:
El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana – Carlos Vives / Carlos Felipe Montoya, video director; Isabel Cristina Vásquez, video producer

J Balvin Earns 13 Latin Grammy Award Nominations, Including Two for Album of the Year

J Balvin is the man to beat…

The Latin Grammy Award nominations have been announced, with the 35-year-old Colombian reggaeton singer leading the pack of nominees with 13 nominations.

J Balvin

J Balvin’s nominations include two for album of the year and two for record of the year (“Rojo” & “China”).

Balvin has a chance to win his first album of the year prize — a category with 10 contenders — thanks to his fifth solo album “Colores” and “Oasis,” his collaborative project with Bad Bunny. Other nominees include Bad Bunny’s sophomore release “YHLQMDLG” as well as albums from Ricky Martin, Carlos Vives, Jesse & Joy, Kany García, Natalia Lafourcade, Camilo and Fito Paez.

Bad Bunny received nine nominations, including two for album of the year (YHLQMDLG & Oasis) and one for record of the year (“Vete”).

Ozuna has eight nominations, including one for record of the year (“China”).

For record of the year, which also has 10 nominees, contenders include popular hip-hop-flavored Latin songs that have dominated the Latin music charts and earned hundreds of millions plays on streaming services, with some even reaching the billion-mark on YouTube, including Karol G and Nicki Minaj’s global hit “Tusa” and “China” by Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna, Balvin and Marco Masis. Other nominees include Balvin’s “Rojo” and Bad Bunny’s “Vete.”

“Tusa” is the sole Latin trap nominee in the song of the year category, where 11 tracks are in contention. It’s a departure for Karol G, who didn’t receive a single nomination last year and was part of the group of uber-successful Latin trap and reggaeton artists who were dissed in top categories like album, song and record of the year.

This year, the 29-year-old Colombian performer, who was named best new artist in 2018, has four nominations, including two shared with Minaj. Karol G’s fiance, Puerto Rican rapper-singer Anuel AA, marked a major breakthrough this year as a first-time nominee. He scored seven nominations, including a bid for best new artist.

“Over the last year, we continued engaging in discussions with our members to improve the awards process and actively encouraged diverse Latin music creators to join and participate,” Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa Jr. said in a statement, calling this year’s nominees “a group that reflects the constant evolution of Latin music.”

As a result of last year’s debacle social media exploded as Latin artists posted images of the Grammy logo with a large red “X″ across it, with words on the image reading in Spanish: “Without reggaeton, there’s no Latin Grammys.” Balvin even skipped the live show and Bad Bunny, who won best urban music album during the telecast, told the audience: “With all due respect, reggaeton is part of the Latin culture.”

To honor Latin rap and reggaeton performers, the Latin Grammys added new categories this year, including best reggaeton performance and best rap/hip-hop song.

Balvin’s 13 nominations includes several categories where he will compete with himself: Outside of album and record of the year, he’s a double nominee in the best urban music album, best urban fusion/performance and best reggaeton performance categories. Ozuna and Bad Bunny will also compete with themselves in several categories.

Others who scored multiple nominations include Juanes, Martin, Alejandro Sanz, Camilo, Carlos Vives, Kany García and Residente, the most decorated winner in the history of Latin Grammys. Rosalía, who won album of the year last year and became the first solo female performer to win the top honor since Shakira’s triumph in 2006, earned four nominations this year.

Apart from Minaj’s two nominations, other popular American artists who will compete for awards include rapper Travis Scott (best short form music video for “TKN” with Rosalía); jazz master Chick Corea and his Spanish Heart Band (best Latin jazz/jazz album for “Antidote”); DJ-producer Diplo (best urban song for “Rave de Favela” ); and rapper Tyga (best reggaeton performance for “Loco Contigo” with DJ Snake and Balvin). Justin Bieber’s right-hand songwriter, Jason Boyd aka Poo Bear, earned an album of the year nomination for his work on Jesse & Joy’s “Aire (Versión Día).”

The 21st annual Latin Grammy Awards will air live on November 19 on Univision. The nominees in the 53 categories were selected from more than 18,000 entries. Songs and albums released between June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020 were eligible for nomination.

Click here to see the full Latin Grammy nominations.

Sky Rompiendo Signs Exclusive Multi-Year Worldwide Deal with Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Sky Rompiendo is switching alliances…

Sony/ATV Music Publishing entered an exclusive multi-year worldwide publishing agreement with the Colombian producer and songwriter.

Sky Rompiendo

Formerly signed to Warner Chappell Music, Sky Rompiendo joins Sony’s roster as his career is on the rise. 

“This is a new challenge,” Sky said about the deal. “With the experience I have gained over the years coupled with this new alliance, I hope that I will be able to discover just how far music will take me.”

J Balvin‘s executive producer and longtime collaborator, Sky produced Balvin’s Colores, which peaked at No. 2 on Billboard‘sTop Latin Albums chart and debuted at No. 15 on the Billboard 200.

Sky is one of the foremost producers and songwriters working in music today,” said Jorge Mejía, president and CEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing’s Latin American and U.S. Latin. “We are honored to have him join our family, and are so looking forward to being part of what’s next!”

Currently, the five-time Latin Grammy-winning producer is working with RosalíaManuel Turizo and Nicky Jam, among others. 

Most recently, the chart-topping producer co-produced Rosalía and Travis Scott‘s “TKN,” which peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart dated June 13.

J Balvin Releases Animated Video for “Negro” Single

J Balvin is going back to black… 

After releasing music videos for his colorful singles like “Rojo” and “Azul,” the 35-year-old Colombian reggaeton singer and aspiring fashion designer has released the new animated video for “Negro.”

j-balvin-negro

In the video, J Balvin, who designed a collection inspired by his new album for Guess, is accompanied by the baddest girl in town and his sidekick dinosaurs as he roams the streets of a post-apocalyptic-like world.

Directed by Colin Tilley, the cryptic video released today finds J Balvin trying to take over the empty streets of a Gotham City-inspired town. Although his crew seems to conquer and outnumber any rival, J Balvin is met by the ultimate ruler, a T-Rex who swallows J Balvin whole in one roar.

With the release of “Negro,” all songs but one on his Colores album have a video. While it’s not clear if there will be a video to “Arcoíris,” the Colombian star posted on his social media “closing the chapter on Colores” announcing the release of “Negro.”

“The goal was to create different content that would really stand out and that the reggaetón world hadn’t really seen before,” says director Tilley about the videos. “Jose is just the definition of a true collaborator. My goal was for every video that drops for it to up the previous one. If we’re not doing that, then we’re not doing our job and there’s no point of releasing every single video.”

J Balvin Teams Up with Guess for Collection Inspired by Latest Album “Colores”

J Balvin is bring hiscoloresto (fashion) Life…

The 35-year-old Colombian reggaeton singer has joined forced with GUESS to launch a Colores-inspired collection for men, women and kids. 

J Balvin x Guess Colores Collection

The multi-color, tie-dye collection includes cropped hooded sweatshirts, swimwear, bodysuits, joggers and J Balvin’s signature matching two-piece tracksuits.

It’s the second time J Balvin collaborates with GUESS to design a clothing collection. 

Last year, he launched a Vibras-themed campaign with 90’s Miami-inspired designs and ready-to-wear accessories.

“What was interesting this time around compared to last time is that we really got to work with him from the inception of the album,” says Nicolai Marciano, director of brand partnerships at GUESS. “I knew he was working on an album before it was called Coloresand once it became Colores, we started working on the creative process and so as we were designing the collection as he was creating the album.”

J Balvin x Guess Colores Collection

“Everything about the collection really represents him and how he feels and the energy he likes to put out. It’s been great to see it come together in an ideal working situation with an artist. We were really able to find the balance between what he wanted and what made sense for us as a brand,” says Marciano.

A standout design is a Colombia-inspired print jacket, shorts and a bucket hat.

J Balvin x Guess Colores Collection

“It’s an idea one of our designers pitched. The photos [on the print] are a collection of different images from around Colombia mixing architecture, agriculture, landscape and kind of just really displaying the different elements that make up Colombia,” explains Marciano. “We were able to use this interesting nylon fabric that showed a lot of saturation of colors where it feels very like alive so it was interesting to see how it was put together. We were all very impressed with the end result.”

The new Colores-inspired collection is now available online.