Tom Perez to Appear on Politico’s New Streaming Series “Plug In with Playbook”

Tom Perez is getting Politico

The 58-year-old Dominican American politician, attorney and current chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), will appear on Politico’s new streaming series, which is tied to its popular Playbook newsletter and franchise.

Tom Perez

Politico’s Plug In with Playbook will be streamed at 9:00 AM ET each morning from the Democratic National Convention and the Republican National Convention.

The Democrats’ convention will begin on August 17,  and Republicans’ convention will launch a week later, on August 24.

Plans for the show will move forward even though both conventions will be virtual.

On Wednesday, Democrats announced that Joe Biden would no longer travel to Milwaukee to deliver his acceptance speech and instead would do so from his home state of Delaware.

Anna Palmer and Jake Sherman, co-authors of Playbook, will anchor the 45-minute show, with plans to interview politicians and party insiders.

In addition to Perez, guests for the DNC include convention CEO Joe Solmonese, Biden campaign senior adviser Symone Sanders, and Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA), who was the vice presidential nominee in 2016.

Kevin McLaughlin, executive director of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, is one of the guests so far during the week of the GOP convention.

Plug In with Playbook also will feature “deep-dive political segments and conversations with Politico journalists, as well as analysis of down-ballot races and a look at this cycle’s swing states. The show may continue at key moments during the campaign.

The show will be live-streamed on Politico’s conventions hub, with a link on Politico’s homepage.

Monica Hernandez to Moderate the Next Democratic Presidential Debate

Monica Hernandezis getting political…

The Latina broadcast journalist and WMUR-TV anchor/reporter will serve as a moderator at the next Democratic presidential debate, alongside ABC News chief anchor George StephanopoulosWorld News Tonight’s David Muir, ABC News correspondent Linsey Davis, and WMUR-TV’s Adam Sexton.

Monica Hernandez

The debate is set for February 7 at 8:00 pm ET in Manchester, New Hampshire, wedged between the Iowa Caucusesfour days before and the New Hampshire primary four days after.

The eighth debate of the primary cycle is hosted by ABC News, WMUR-TV and Apple News. It is set at St. Anselm Collegein Manchester and will air on ABCHearst Television’s WMUR-TV, Apple News and on ABC News Live.

So far, all six of the candidates who qualified for the previous debate – Joe BidenPete ButtigiegAmy KlobucharBernie SandersTom Steyer and Elizabeth Warren— appear to have met the fundraising and polling thresholds to qualify for the debate. Another way in per Democratic National Committeerules would be to score a pledged delegate in Iowa.

The qualifying criteria involving grassroots fundraising (225,000 individual donors with 1,000 unique donors or more per state) likely will keep out candidate Michael Bloomberg, who is self-financing.

The previous debate hosted by CNNat Drake Universityin Des Moines, Iowa on January 14 drew an estimated 7.3 million viewers, a slight uptick from the 6.17 million who watched the debate in December, sponsored by PBSand Politico, and the 6.5 million who watched November’s event, hosted by MSNBC.

The New Hampshire debate is the second of four in each of the key voting states. Next up is February 19 in Las Vegas, hosted by NBC News and MSNBC with The Nevada Independent, and February 25 in in Charleston, SC, hosted by CBS News, the Congressional Black Caucus Institute and Twitter.

Perez: First Latino Chairman of the Democratic National Committee

The United States has its first Latino Democratic Party chairman… And, his name is Tom Perez.

The 55-year-old Dominican American politician, consumer advocate, and civil rights lawyer, a former Labor Secretary, beat out Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison a hotly contested race to lead the Democratic Party as their new chairman, and their first-ever Latino leader, on Saturday.

Tom Perez

Perez defeated Ellison in a 235-200 vote among the Democratic National Committee‘s 435 members who cast ballots Saturday.

It took two rounds of voting to select a winner after Perez found himself just one vote shy in the first ballot. The five other candidates, who had amassed 13.5 total votes, all exited the race before the second round began.

In a victory speech, Perez vowed that Democrats would wage an all-out battle to deny Trump a second term.

“We are at a ‘where were you?’ moment in American history: Where were you in 2017 when we had the worst President in US history?” he said.

Immediately after winning, Perez made a quick move to bring Ellison’s supporters into the fold — appointing Ellison as the deputy chair of the DNC, to cheers and unanimous approval from the crowd.

Ellison called on Democrats to support Perez.

“It’s my honor to serve this party under the chairmanship of Tom Perez,” he said.

The results brought a chaotic close to a race that stretched on for three months. In the waning days, former Vice President Joe Biden and several aides to former President Barack Obama — including Valerie Jarrett and David Simas — made calls to undecided members in an effort to sway them toward Perez.

In Ellison’s camp, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and supportive members of Congress applied pressure on DNC members with phone calls.

Obama touted what he said was the party’s track record of expanding the economy, creating new jobs, keeping Americans safe through “tough, smart” foreign policy, and expanding the right to health insurance.

“That’s a legacy the Democratic Party will always carry forward,” Obama said. “I know that Tom Perez will unite us under that banner of opportunity, and lay the groundwork for a new generation of Democratic leadership for this big, bold, inclusive, dynamic America we love so much.”

In a tweet, Hillary Clinton congratulated Perez and Ellison, writing: “Excited for strong, unified party standing for best of our country into the future.”

Perez, a Maryland Democrat who worked in Obama’s Justice Department before serving as labor secretary and making Clinton’s short list for the vice presidential nomination, made overtures to Ellison’s backers in his nomination speech before the votes were cast.

“Good leaders are great listeners. You will always have my ear, and I will always have your back,” Perez told the crowd, promising to “plan strategy together, lift each other up together.”

“You will not be underutilized,” he said. “You are of import in everything we do. The most important question you will hear from me is, ‘What do you think?'”

Perez Inching Closer to Clinching Democratic Party Chair Position

Tom Perez is one step closer to leading…

The 55-year-old American politician, consumer advocate and civil rights lawyer moved closer to clinching the race to chair the Democratic Party after one of his competitors dropped out and endorsed the former labor secretary — shaking up the contest two days before the election.

Tom Perez

South Carolina Democratic Party chairman Jaime Harrison emailed Democratic National Committee members Thursday to say he is dropping out and backing Perez, who was the United States Secretary of Labor from 2013 to 2017.

Harrison was a distant contender — far behind Perez and Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison. “In a former job, I whipped votes for House Democrats. I know what a path to victory looks like,” Harrison said in his email, acknowledging he couldn’t win.

But with both Perez and Ellison within striking distance of the majority of the DNC‘s 447 voting members, Harrison’s support could push Perez over the edge — and make Harrison the kingmaker.

Vote-counting is nebulous, since some DNC members have not revealed their plans even privately, and there’s no reason those who have committed to support one candidate couldn’t change their minds at the last minute.

Read More

But a source close to Perez said Thursday that Harrison had about 30 supporters, and about 20 were expected to now back Perez. The source said Perez already had about 200 supporters — but cautioned that Saturday’s proceedings are hard to predict.

With several of the DNC’s 447 membership slots vacant, 442 DNC members are eligible to vote Saturday. If all do so, it will take 222 votes to win.

Harrison’s move comes days after New Hampshire Democratic Party chair Ray Buckley dropped out and endorsed Ellison.

A Perez spokeswoman said Harrison did not receive any commitment for a specific role within the party in exchange for his support.

“Every person who knows Jaime Harrison will say he is one of the smartest, most dedicated, and genuine leaders we know,” Perez said in a statement. “Simply put, he’s one of a kind. Jaime’s commitment to the party is like no other and I’m proud to have his support as we both work together to invest in state parties, turnaround the DNC, and get back to winning.”

Harrison’s exit leaves South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Idaho Democratic Party executive director Sally Boynton Brown likely vying for third place, each with what Democrats tracking the race say are about 10 votes in their favor.

Buttigieg had hoped to emerge as the balloting went on Saturday in Atlanta. But the increasingly narrowing field before the election means the race could end too quickly for a third option to break out.

Huizar to Host Fundraising Event for Hillary Clinton

Jose Huizar is ready to play host…

The Mexican politican, who currently served as a member of the Los Angeles City Council, will host a fundraising event for Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton during her return trip to Southern California on Cinco de Mayo (May 5).

Jose Huizar

Clinton was in Los Angeles last weekend for a series of events, including a campaign speech at Los Angeles Southwest College and a series of fundraisers.

The highest profile was a gathering at the Studio City home of George and Amal Clooney, with the money raised going to the Hillary Victory Fund. That is a joint fundraising committee that splits proceeds between the Clinton campaign, the Democratic National Committee and state party committees.

Huizar was elected to the Los Angeles City Council’s 14th District in 2005 and re-elected in 2007, 2011 and in what will be his final term, 2015.

Rodriguez to Host Democratic National Committee Fundraiser with President Barack Obama

Robert Rodriguez is preparing for a presidential experience…

The award-winning Mexican-American filmmaker will host President Barack Obama at his home in Austin, Texas, on July 17 to raise money for the Democratic National Committee‘s midterm election efforts, according to The Hollywood Reporter .

Robert Rodriguez

Rodriguez, whose cult classic El Mariachi was selected in 2011 for preservation in the National Film Registry, is the latest in a growing number of Hollywood Latinos throwing their money and influence behind the Democratic Party.

Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson, Demi Lovato and Danny Trejo are among those who’ve signed on to support the event. Tickets for the Austin fundraiser range from $5,000 to $32,400.

Obama and Rodriguez – the founder of the El Rey Network – first met in 2012, when the filmmaker traveled to Washington to speak with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute about the importance of diversifying the distribution networks.

While there, Obama invited Rodriguez to participate in a roundtable discussion about the importance of Hispanics in the U.S.

Since then, Rodriguez has emerged as a strong advocate of Latino issues in the country

Following his film debut with El Mariachi, Rodriguez has helped launch the film careers of several prominent Latino actors and actresses, including Antonio Banderas, Salma Hayek andAlba. His insistence on casting a Latino family for the popular Spy Kids series built the first major theatrical family franchise featuring Latinos in heroic roles.

Hinojosa Becomes Texas Democrats’ First Latino Chairman

Gilberto Hinojosa has made history in the Lone Star State…

The 59-year-old Mexican American politician has become the first Latino elected by the Texas Democrats to the state’s chairman’s position, a move indicating the party intends to play a bigger role in the Republican-dominated state.

Gilberto Hinojosa
Hinojosa,  a former judge, county party leader and member of the Democratic National Committee, was overwhelmingly chosen to lead the party for the next two years by delegates on the last day of the state convention in Houston. He’ll replace Boyd Richie, who has led the party since 2006.

The Mission-native takes over a party that hasn’t won a statewide election since 1994 and doesn’t control either chamber of the Texas Legislature. But the state’s evolving demographics favor Democrats, with non-Hispanic whites now making up less than 50 percent of the population. In the 2010 election, more than 85 percent of minorities voted Democratic.

“We as a party need to realize that there are more of us than there are of them,” said Hinojosa. “We believe that everyone in this great state deserves an equal chance … and we can only do that if we win elections.”

Fort Worth state Rep. Marc Veasey, currently in a runoff for a Democratic nomination to Congress, welcomed Hinojosa as someone who had experience working at the national level and at organizing the grassroots of the party.

“His election is historic and besides that, Gilberto is a good guy,” Veasey said. “He is a coalition builder; he gets along with a broad group of people.”

Hinojosa has promised to change the math on Texas elections. In the May 29 primary vote, twice as many Republicans cast ballots as Democrats, but, overall, less than 20 percent of registered voters showed up. Turnout among Texas Hispanics has never matched that in other states with significant Latino populations.

“There is no independent issue out there that has caused this to happen,” Hinojosa said. “They are not going to go out and vote for anybody if they are not engaged, no matter how dynamic of a leader you’ve got running … as a party we have to engage them and offer strong candidates.”

Hinojosa was the first in his family to attend college at the University of Texas-Pan American and graduated from Georgetown University Law School.

Villaraigosa to Serve as Chair of the Democratic National Convention

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is preparing to shine bright in the national spotlight…

The 59-year-old Mexican American politician has been tapped to chair the Democratic Party’s national convention this summer in Charlotte, N.C.

Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who serves as the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, announced in an email to DNC members that Villaraigosa will be nominated to chair the September convention.

Chairing the national convention, where Democrats are expected to nominate President Barack Obama for a second term, will place Villaraigosa in a national spotlight. Overseeing the gathering will also place the Latino mayor front and center as Democrats attempt to woo Latino support for Obama and other candidates.

Wasserman Schultz tells DNC members that Villaraigosa has empowered people during his career and will encourage engagement from Americans across the country.

Meanwhile, Villaraigosa, one of the nation’s most prominent elected Latino officials, said he expected to play a role in the campaign’s outreach to Latino voters. The White House is counting on strong Latino turnout, especially in battleground states such as Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico and Florida. But the mayor said he planned to speak “to a broad cross section of people, not just to Latinos.”

Villaraigosa was elected mayor in 2005 and re-elected in 2009.