The Lincoln Project Releases Emotional Music Video to Demi Lovato’s “Commander in Chief”

The Lincoln Project is taking Demi Lovato’s politically charged new single “Commander in Chief” and building on it’s emotional message.

Demi Lovato

The anti-Trump political action committee has shared their own music video for the song. It shows clips of the devastating effects of the president’s mismanagement of the coronavirus, of people on ventilators in hospitals and families with masks only able to talk to each other through glass doors. The scene then turns to the Black Lives Matter movement, as thousands of protesters took to the streets across the nation to demand justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and more who have been killed at the hands of police.

The vignette ends on an uplifting note, with people of all races, ages and genders coming together to vote in the presidential election.

“Demi Lovato put it best,” the description reads, and links out to a donation page for The Lincoln Project, which will go to voter outreach programs in an effort to “end the suffering, end the corruption, and end the presidency of the worst ‘Commander in Chief’ in our country’s history.”

Demi Lovato to Take Part in Vote With Us Virtual Rally on “Vote Early Day,” Saturday, October 24th

Demi Lovato is encouraging you to vote with her…

The 28-year-old part-Mexican American singer will appear during the Vote With Us virtual rally, which is set to livestream on “Vote Early Day,” on Saturday, October 24th.

Demi Lovato

Lovato joins a roster of A-list participants that includes Justin Bieber, Mark Ruffalo and Vic Mensa.

Andra Day will also perform “Remember I Bleed” and the War and Treaty will cover John Lennon’s “Power to the People” during the three-hour event, which highlights early vote events in Atlanta, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, and Phoenix.

The Vote for Us livestream will also show clips from the upcoming documentary Us Kids, featuring survivors of the Parkland school shooting-turned-activists Emma González, David Hogg, Jaclyn Corin, Samantha Fuentes, Bria Smith and Alex King.

“To vote is to harness your power, and we have to use the power that’s given to us,” Gonzalez said in a statement. “Don’t just vote for yourself, vote for every person; for every person whose basic rights are at risk, for every person who can’t vote because they are undocumented or incarcerated, for every person who is affected by the system and for every person who fought with everything they had just to give us the right to vote. Vote because you can. Vote because we haven’t always been able to.”

Organizers behind advocacy groups We Stand United, March On, Future Coalition, Us Kids Film (Sundance 2020), Black Voters Matter, M.O.B.B., Headcount, Vote Early Day, Future Coalition, All in for Voting, Pull Up Neighbor, Black Men Vote, Ballot Ready, Milk Studios, Collective Education Fund, APAI Vote, RepresentUs, League of Women Voters, The Early Vote, and Civic Power Media have united for the first time for the Vote With Us event, which aims to increase voter turnout among young voters.

“Young people are done watching older generations gamble our futures away for the sake of power,” said Katie Eder, Executive Director of Future Coalition, said in a statement. “We’ve spent much of 2020 making our message loud and clear in the streets, and we’re going to make it binding at the ballot box, too. After November 3, nobody will say anymore that young people don’t show up. We are showing up in record numbers and we are the ones who are about to decide the future of our country.”

The Vote With Us rally will livestream both at the official site and YouTube as well as partner coalitions’ social media pages on October 24th beginning 3:00 pm EST.

Lovato has upped her political voice in the last week, with the release of her Trump-bashing song “Commander In Chief.”

Tanya Saracho Among Top TV & Film Creators Demanding More Latinx Representation in Hollywood

Tanya Saracho is calling for more Latinx representation in Hollywood…

The Mexican playwright, screenwriter and actress is among some of the top creators in television and film who are demanding for change when it comes to Latinx representation as Hispanic Heritage Months comes to an end.

Tanya Saracho

In an open letter to Hollywood more than 270 Latinx showrunners, creators, and television and feature writers, including Saracho, Lin-Manuel MirandaGloria Calderon-Kellett, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, Steven Canals, John Leguizamo, Linda Yvette-Chavez, Carolina Paiz, Marco Ramirez, Javier Grillo-Marxuach and more are calling for systemic change in the entertainment industry.

The letter begins: “As we come to the end of Hispanic Heritage Month in the midst of a global pandemic and continued racial injustice, many of us in the Latinx community have found it difficult to celebrate. Inspired by the activism of the Black and Indigenous communities, many of whom also identify as Latinx, we stand in solidarity with our fellow Black, Native and Indigenous writers, co-signing their WGAW Open Letters and echoing their demands for systemic change in our industry.”

“As Latinx Showrunners, Creators, TV and Feature Writers, we are incensed by the continued lack of Latinx representation in our industry, especially among the Black and Indigenous members of our community,” the letter continues. “Our stories are important, and our erasure onscreen contributes to the persistent prejudice that prevents real change in this country. This prejudice is not as overt as the one that keeps immigrant children in cages and separates families at the border, or as violent as the racism that is killing our Black, Brown, and Indigenous community members at the hands of police.”

“But when we are onscreen, we’re often relegated to stereotypes or villains. And as a recent​ ​New York Times OpEd​ states, ‘White elites cannot muffle a huge, vibrant community for decades and not expect consequences. For Latinos in the Trump era, these consequences are deadly, from Hurricane Maria to the Walmart shooting in El Paso and the pandemic, as well as soaring hate crimes.’”

The letter points out that the Latinx community makes up 18.3% of the U.S. population but it is not reflected in film and TV. There are only 4.7% feature writers and 8.7% TV writers that are Latinx. As Latinx writers move up to Showrunner level, the stats only get more dismal. “By refusing to tell our stories AND by refusing to put us in charge of telling them — Hollywood power brokers are complicit in our exclusion,” the letter remarks.

This is even further supported by a recent study from CAA and Parrot Analytics, which shows that even though television shows are a lot more diverse than they were three years ago, not all racial and ethnic groups were equally well represented in scripted debuts. Latinos and Hispanics remain significantly underrepresented despite being one of the fastest-growing demographics in the country.

While there are shows like One Day At A Time that having managed to get multiple season orders, there have been other Latino-fronted shows in the past years, like The Baker and the Beauty and United We Fall — that have been canceled before getting the chance to find their footing beyond one season.

The letter can be summarized with three words included heavily throughout: “We are tired.”

The open letter does not mince words with the demands and draws out exactly what needs to be done including creating stories for and about the Latinx community by Latinx creators; greenlighting Latinx-fronted projects; respecting all aspects and intersections of the Latinx cultural representation; and hiring Latinx creators for non-Latinx projects.

The letter, which was posted on social channels with the hashtag #EndLatinXclusion, closes with “Stories are powerful. Stories change the world. Let’s get on the right side of history so we can continue to create needed change and tell captivating stories together.”

This initiative was launched by the Untitled Latinx Project (ULP) founded by Saracho. It’s an all-Latina advocacy group formed to increase representation of Latinx created stories for television. The goal of this call to action was uniting the professional community of Latinx writers, creators and showrunners.

Read the letter in full here.

Demi Lovato Releases the Anti-Donald Trump Anthem “Commander in Chief”

Demi Lovato isn’t hiding her feelings about Donald Trump

The 28-year-old part-Mexican American singer and actress has released the official music video for her politically-charged anthem “Commander in Chief.”

Demi Lovato

The singer didn’t mince words while sharing her feelings about the president through song.

“Commander in Chief, honestly / If I did the things you do / I couldn’t sleep, seriously,” she sings. “Do you even know the truth? / We’re in a state of crisis, people are dyin’ / While you line your pockets deep.”

In the music video, Lovato features a diverse group of people lip-syncing or using sign language to perform the lyrics.

Lovato released some backlash from her followers on social media following the song’s release. She even shared a screenshot on her Instagram stories of a comment she received after releasing the music video. The comment read in part “I hope you realize this makes people that don’t have the same political views feel like they can’t listen to you anymore.”

“I’m personally ashamed to be a Lovatic right now but no matter how hard it is I’m not letting this song change my feelings about you especially after everything you have helped me with,” the person also said. “I really hope this doesn’t ruin your career Demetria.”

Lovato then shared her response to the comment, in which she stated that she had a right to her own political views, and that celebrities “aren’t just around to entertain people for our entire lives.”

“I literally don’t care if this ruins my career,” Lovato said. “This isn’t about that. My career isn’t about that.”

“As much as I would like to be sad that I disappointed you, I’m too busy being bummed that you expect me, a queer Hispanic woman, to silence my views/beliefs in order to please my audience,” the singer said.

Demi Lovato to Take Part in “Honor Her Wish” Virtual Rally to Honor the Late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Demi Lovato is celebrating an Supreme (Court) legend…

The 28-year-old half-Mexican American singer/actress will take part in a special rally to pay tribute to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg‘s legacy.

Demi Lovato

Lovato joins an all-star roster that includes Miley Cyrus, Jessica Biel, Kristen Bell, Beanie Feldstein, Elizabeth Banks, Yvette Nicole Brown and Mae Whitman, who’ll all take part in the “Honor Her Wish” virtual event.

The program, set for Monday, October 12 at 8:00 pm ET, will demand the U.S. Senate honor RBG‘s dying wish that her seat be filled after the inauguration next January. The event will will coincide with the first day of Republican hearings to confirm Donald Trump’s nominee for a Supreme Court replacement.

The new group of celebrities join previously announced participants Hayley Williams, Phoebe Bridgers, Kesha, Michael Stipe, Margo Price, John Batiste and Kathleen Hanna.

Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi, Stacey Abrams, Elizabeth Warren and more leaders will also speak out at the event.

“Honor Her Wish” is open to the public.

RSVP here in advance.

Selena Gomez Named to Time Magazine’s Time 100 List of the World’s Most Influential People

It’s a special Time for Selena Gomez

Time has revealed its Time 100, the magazine’s annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, with the 28-year-old Mexican American singer/actress earning a spot.

Selena Gomez

Gomez, one of nine Latino/as to make this year’s list, has been recognized for “unabashedly spreading her wings and influence into whatever lane her passions lead her,” writes America Ferrera in an essay about the artist.

“She has always been a great musician, but she’s also always been more than her music,” continues Ferrera. “In the past year, in addition to releasing her third No. 1 album, Rare, Selena got her own cooking show on HBO MaxSelena + Chef, and will star in and executive-produce the Hulu comedy series Only Murders in the Building. She launched her own beauty line, with which she’s pledged to raise $100 million over 10 years for mental-health services in underserved communities. She’s used her enormous social-media platform to encourage voting and to support Black Lives Matter.”

Additionally, Gomez has been an outspoken advocate for immigrant rights in the United States at a time when immigrants are fearing for their safety and ICE raids are becoming more commonplace. Last year, she executive-produced the Netflix docuseries Living Undocumented, and told the story of her own family’s emotional journey from Mexico to the U.S. in Time.

J Balvin has earned a spot on the Time 100…

The 35-year-old Colombian reggaeton singer has been nicknamed the Prince of Reggaeton, with his songs garnering streams of more than 42 billion.

This summer, Balvin, who has taken to social media to talk about his struggle with anxiety and mental health, partnered with Deepak Chopra to launch a free 21-day meditation experience.

“He’s opened up the doors for Latino artists everywhere by making the world hear and fall in love with our culture, our sounds and our spirit,” says pop star Camila Cabello in an essay about the man born as José Álvaro Osorio Balvín. “What I truly admire and love the most about José is that he is just himself. He’s himself to the world, he’s himself to his friends and his peers, and he’s got the kind of heart that makes him a person everyone is rooting for. When he wins, we all win.”

Anne Hidalgo has been named to the Time 100.

The 61-year-old French–Spanish politician, who has served as Mayor of Paris – is the first woman to hold the office – since 2014, is being recognized for being a leader in the movement to solve the global climate crisis.

“Even in the midst of confronting the global pandemic, Mayor Hidalgo has turned Paris into a shining example of how cities can lead the transition to cleaner, healthier and more prosperous societies,” writes former U.S. Vice President Al Gore. “She is transforming the city’s landscape to make it friendlier to pedestrians and bikers, cutting car traffic and making the air safer to breathe.”

Dr. Cecilia Martinez is also being recognized for her environmental work…

“As a leader in everything from international projects to grassroots organizing, Cecilia Martinez has dedicated her impressive career to a moral imperative: the pursuit of environmental justice and the inclusion of equity and justice in environmental policy,” writes U.S. Senator Cory Booker about the co-founder and executive director at the Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (CEED).

Bonnie Castillo, the 60-year-old Latina registered nurse and executive director of National Nurses United, has earned her spot on this year’s list for support of frontline health workers.

“She was among the first to call attention to the lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) available to nurses across the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic, and fought layoffs and pay cuts that nurses faced despite their vital frontline work,” writes civil rights activist and United Farm Workers of America co-founder Dolores Huerta. “Bonnie’s commitment to the labor movement and unions is unwavering; she states that unions are the foundation of a democratic society. Bonnie does not just work to heal patients; she works to heal society.” 

Felipe Neto has also made this year’s list…

The 32-year-old Brazilian social media star, who has 39 million YouTube subscribers and 12 million Twitter followers, is considered the most consequential digital influencer in Brazil and possibly in the world.

“A decade ago, from his family’s humble Rio de Janeiro home, he began creating content for YouTube and quickly found fame, a huge and loyal young audience, and lucrative endorsements,” writes Brazilian congressman David Miranda. “What has changed—radically—is how Neto uses his platform. His early notoriety was generated by standard fare for online adolescents: video games, celebrities and girls. But with the 2018 election of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro and the empowerment of his proto-fascist movement, Neto, risking his brand and safety, repurposed his popularity to become one of Bolsonaro’s most effective opponents.”

For the second year in a row, Jair Bolsonaro has been named to the Time 100.

“The story of Brazil’s year can be told in numbers: 137,000 lives lost to the coronavirus. The worst recession in 40 years. At least five ministers sacked or resigned from the Cabinet. More than 29,000 fires in the Amazon rain forest in August alone. One President whose stubborn skepticism about the pandemic and indifference to environmental despoliation has driven all these figures upward,” writes Time’s international editor. “Yet the number that really matters is 37—the percentage of Brazilian society that approved of Jair Bolsonaro in a late-August poll, the highest rating since he took office early last year. Despite a storm of corruption allegations, and one of the highest COVID-19 death tolls in the world, the right-wing firebrand remains popular with a large section of Brazilians.” 

Sister Norma Pimentel is being heralded for her work with immigrants…

“Sister Pimentel has been on the front lines of mercy for three decades, supporting migrants who are seeking refuge in the U.S. along Texas’ border with Mexico. As executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley, she directs efforts to provide shelter, food, sanctuary and comfort to people often treated as less than human. Her organization has housed and assisted well over 100,000 people at the border,” says former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro. “Her work has taken on greater importance in the era of Donald Trump, and for good reason. As he has acted with cruelty toward migrants, she has acted with compassion. As he has preyed on the vulnerable and sought rejection, she has preached community and acceptance. As he has promoted fear, she has taught love.

Gabriela Cámara is being recognized for being “more than a chef—she is a Renaissance woman on the front lines of our industry,” writes chef Jose Andres about the Mexican chef.

Through her visionary career, Camara has become one of Mexico’s leading culinary diplomats, both in spirit and in practice.

“Not only does she run two of the most iconic kitchens on the continent—Contramar in Mexico City and Cala in San Francisco—offering the very best of her cultural heritage, she is also an adviser to the Mexican President, showing by example how food can have an impact far beyond the walls of a restaurant kitchen,” continues Andres.

Click here for the complete Time 100 list.

Florida Lt. Governor Jeanette Núñez to Speak at This Week’s Republican National Convention

Jeanette Núñez is preparing to take the national stage…

The 48-year-old Cuban American Florida Lieutenant Governor politician and businesswoman, who currently serves as Florida’s Lieutenant Governor, will speak at this week’s Republican National Convention.

Jeanette Núñez

Núñez will speak on Tuesday night as part of the Republicans’ Land of Opportunity-themed day at the RNC.

Meanwhile, Mary Ann Mendoza, the mother of Mesa Police Department sergeant Brandon Mendoza, who was killed by an illegal immigrant in a head-on car collision in Arizona in 2014, will also speak on Tuesday.

This week, Republicans are looking to energize their base – and bid for sought-after undecided voters – as they hold their own part digital, part in-person convention to officially nominate President Donald Trump as their 2020 candidate.

The Republican National Convention, like its Democratic counterpart, is held each presidential election cycle and is where the party finalizes and presents its policy platforms going into the final stretch of the campaign. During the event, Republican delegates from across the country also pledge their votes for potential candidates based on the outcome of state primary elections.

This year, no more than 336 delegates – the 2016 convention had more than 2,400 – will gather in-person in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct the roll call vote and formally nominate Trump, who faced little opposition in the primary season. 

The unorthodox convention is expected to be a test for the Republican party.

Initially scheduled to be a traditional in-person gathering in Charlotte, in June the party moved most of the convention to Jacksonville, Florida after clashing with North Carolina’s governor over coronavirus restrictions. 

Then in late July, Trump cancelled the Jacksonville portion of the convention completely as infections in the state rose. The party then pivoted towards a more digital approach. 

Democrats, in contrast, had been repurposing their convention to be fully digital since June.

The four-day convention, running from August 24 to 27, will center around an overarching theme of “Honoring the Great American Story” and will feature everyday Americans who will testify that the president has positively affected their lives, according to the campaign. Events will be live streamed during the day, with the main programming taking place between 8:30pm and 11pm (00:30 GMT and 03:00 GMT) each night. 

Vice President Mike Pence, who will also accept the party’s nomination, said on Friday the convention would focus on the economy and law and order, while its speakers will present the Democratic party as being taken over by “the radical left.”

Trump is also expected to feature prominently during each day of the event before making his acceptance speech, likely from the South Lawn of the White House, on the final day.

Here’s the schedule for the upcoming convention: 

Monday, August 24

Theme:
“Land of Promise”

Speakers:
A maximum of 336 delegates will meet in the morning from 9am to 1pm (13:00 – 17:00 GMT) before conducting a nighttime roll call in which Trump and Pence will officially be nominated.
Senator Tim Scott 
House Republican Whip Steve Scalise 
Representative Matt Gaetz 
Representative Jim Jordan 
Former Ambassador to United Nations Nikki Haley
Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel
Georgia State Representative Vernon Jones
Amy Johnson Ford
Kimberly Guilfoyle
Natalie Harp
Charlie Kirk
Kim Klacik
Mark and Patricia McCloskey, St Louis couple who brandished guns at Black Lives Matter protesters
Congressional candidate Sean Parnell
Andrew Pollack, whose daughter Meadow was killed in the 2018 Parkland, Florida, school shooting
Donald Trump Jr.
Tanya Weinreis, Montana coffee shop owner whose business and employee’s livelihoods were saved by the federal virus relief Paycheck Protection Program

Tuesday, August 25

Theme:
“Land of Opportunity”

Speakers:
First Lady Melania Trump
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo
Senator Rand Paul
Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds
Florida Lieutenant Governor Jeanette Nunez
Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron
Former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi
Abby Johnson, a former Planned Parenthood employee who is now an anti-abortion activist.
Jason Joyce
Myron Lizer
Mary Ann Mendoza
Megan Pauley
Cris Peterson
John Peterson
Nicholas Sandmann, Kentucky Catholic high school student who successfully sued a media organisation for not providing context to a confrontation with a Native American activist at Right to Life march that went viral
Eric Trump
Tiffany Trump

Wednesday, August 26

Theme:
“Land of Heroes”

Speakers:
Vice President Mike Pence
Second Lady Karen Pence
Senator Marsha Blackburn
Senator Joni Ernst
South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem
Representative Dan Crenshaw
Representative Elise Stefanik
Representative Lee Zeldin
Former Acting Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell
White counselor Kellyanne Conway
Vice Presidential National Security Advisor Keith Kellogg
Jack Brewer
Sister Dede Byrne
Madison Cawthorn
Scott Dane
Clarence Henderson
Ryan Holets
Michael McHale
Congressional candidate Burgess Owens
Lara Trump

Thursday, August 27, 2020

Theme:
“Land of Greatness”

Speakers:
President Donald Trump
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell 
Senator Tom Cotton
House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy
Representative Jeff Van Drew 
Ivanka Trump
White House Deputy Assistant Ja’Ron Smith
Police Sergeant Ann Dorn, widow of retired police captain David Dorn who was killed during violent protests in St Louis in June
Debbie Flood
Former mayor of NYC Rudy Giuliani
Franklin Graham
Alice Johnson, a woman whose prison sentence was commuted by Trump
Wade Mayfield
Carl and Marsha Mueller, parents of Kayla Mueller, a humanitarian worker killed by ISIL (also known as ISIS)
Dana White, president of Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC)

Selena Gomez Encourages People to Register to Vote on ‘Register a Friend Day’

Selena Gomez is encouraging people to register to vote…

The 28-year-old Mexican American singer/actress took to social media over the weekend to remind Americans to make sure they’re registered to vote for the November 3 election, which is less than 100 days away.

Selena Gomez

Gomez shared information about how to register to vote as part of Register a Friend Day. Other celebrities who took part in the initiative included Ariana Grande, Lin-Manuel Miranda, former President Barack Obamaand former First Lady Michelle Obama,LL Cool Jand Cher.

President Donald Trump has continued to spread false theories about voting by mail – even though he’s done so himself – leading election experts to worry that a nation gripped by the coronavirus pandemic could face a chaotic election that may put even more Americans’ health at risk with a push for in-person voting in the midst of both a health and financial crisis.

Currently, presumptive Democratic candidate Joe Biden has a commanding 50-36 lead over Trump, whose mishandled response to COVID-19 has put the U.S. atop the list of countries with the most cases and deaths.

Click here for more information on how to register to vote.

Lin-Manuel Miranda is Getting Lyrical About John Bolton’s Book Title

Lin-Manuel Miranda is getting political…

The 40-year-old Puerto Rican star and Hamilton creator has weighed in on John Bolton’s lift of a lyric from his Tony Award-winning musical for use as the title of his memoir The Room Where It Happened.

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Since the former national security adviser announced the title last year, Hamiltonfans have taken notice of the reference to the musical’s song “The Room Where It Happens.” 

Earlier this year, the show’s producer, Jeffrey Seller, told a California newspaper, “I don’t even know how to describe it; it’s just strange.”

And now Miranda has just chimed it… by adding a lyric to another Hamilton number, “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story.” 

He tweeted – with the additions in brackets – today:

Let me tell you what I wish I’d known
When I was young and dreamed of glory
You have no control
Who lives, who dies, who [borrows your song title to write a cash-in book when they could have testified before Congress]
tells your story…

Bolton’s book is set for release on June 23, and while his portrait of President Donald Trump is far from flattering, Miranda calls him out for not stepping up and testifying before Congress during the impeachment hearings.

Seizing the moment, Miranda provides a link in his tweet to Fair Fight, an advocate for fair elections in Georgia. Miranda’s link opens to a page that says, “Sign up to volunteer and help us build a more inclusive Georgia, where every vote is counted and every voice is heard.”

Ritchie Valens’ Hometown Post Office to be Named After Him

Ritchie Valensis getting a special stamp of approval… 

President Donald Trump has signed a resolution renaming a Los Angeles area post office after the late rock ‘n’ roll legend, whose real name is Richard Steven Valenzuela.

Ritchie Valens

The Los Angeles Daily Newsreported that Pacoima Post Office will be named the Ritchie Valens Post Office Building.

Democratic Rep. Tony Cardenasintroduced the resolution to rename the facility, along with another to rename the Van Nuys Post Officeafter Marilyn Monroe.

Valens attended San Fernando High Schooland was discovered in 1958 at the American Legionhall in Pacoima. His hits included “La Bamba,” an adaptation of a Mexican folk song. A film about his life with the same title was released in 1987.

A rock and roll pioneer and a forefather of the Chicano rock movement, Valens’ recording career lasted eight months and abruptly ended when he died in a plane crash at the age of 17 alongside Buddy Holly and J. P. “The Big Bopper” Richardsonin 1959.