Ozuna Among 2,321 People Invited to Join the Recording Academy

Ozunahas received a special invitation…

The 28-year-old Puerto Rican reggaetonand Latin trap singer is among the 2,321 people who’ve been invited to join the Recording Academy.

Ozuna

This year’s “freshman class,” as the academy calls it, is 48% female (compared to 49% in last year’s freshman class invites), 21% African American/African descent (compared to 26%), 8% Hispanic (compared to 7%), 3% Asian American/Pacific Islander/Asian (same as last year) and 51% people who are age 39 or younger (same as last year).

Some of those invited didn’t disclose their demographic details. On gender, 3% did not disclose. On ethnicity, 13% didn’t disclose. On age, a whopping 25% didn’t disclose.

Women account for 26% of the academy’s overall membership, not just the freshman class (same as last year). People from traditionally-underrepresented communities account for 25%, up a point from last year’s 24%. People who are age 39 or younger account for 25%, down from 29% last year.

According to the academy, 79% of this year’s freshman class is being invited as potential voting members, the other 21% as (non-voting) professional members.

Laura Segura, the executive director of MusiCares, said last year that it’ll become harder and harder for the Recording 

Academy to find qualified new members to invite unless the music industry extends more opportunities to women and people of color. 

“We will face challenges with future new member classes if not enough women and people of color are being hired, mentored and have access to opportunities to lead and excel,” she said.

The Academy also created a 90-minute video, “Your Academy: Welcoming the 2020 New Member Class,” in which both current members, like John Legend and Yolanda Adams, and 2020 invitees, including Ozuna, discuss membership. 

The discussion, held on Zoom on June 24, was moderated by Justin JosephGrammy.com editor-in-chief. The roundtable debuted today on GRAMMY.com.

In order to participate in the process for the upcoming Grammy Awards, prospective new members have to accept their invitations by September 15. 

The 63rd Grammy Awards are scheduled to take place on January 31, 2021, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

More information on the Recording Academy’s membership process and requirements can be found here. Full details surrounding the new class can be found here.

Jennifer Lopez: The Face of Versace’s Spring/Summer 2020 Campaign

It’s the print that keeps on giving for Jennifer Lopez

The 50-year-old Puerto Rican superstar is teaming up with Versace to revive one of her most epic looks.

Jennifer Lopez - Versace Dress

Over the weekend, J.Loannounced that she’ll be the face of Versace’s spring/summer 2020 campaign and shared a few images featuring the designer’s sleek garments. 

One of the portraits — shot by famed photographers Mert & Marcus— is of Lopez lounging in a jungle-print jumpsuit with matching jacket. 

The turquoise and lime green print of the ensemble is the same as the sheer, plunging dress she wore to the 2000 Grammy Awardswhich will also keep time on Versace watchbands this season.

Tainy Signs with William Morris Endeavor (WME)

Tainyhas new representation…

William Morris Endeavor (WME) has announced that the agency will represent the 30-year-old Puerto Rican record producer and songwriter, whose real name is Marco Masis, in all areas worldwide.

Tainy

Tainy, who continues to be managed by Lex Borreroat Neon16, will work across all departments of the agency to build his business. Billboard hasconfirmed that this is the first time he’s been represented by a talent agency.

After a successful 2019 as an artist, landing at No. 1 on Billboard‘s Latin Producerschart for 26 consecutive weeks, Tainy crowned the year-end Hot Latin Songs Producerschart, followed by DJ SnakeMambo Kingz and DJ Luian.

His roster includes recent chart-topping hits such as Cardi B’s “I Like It,” “Callaita” in collaboration with Bad Bunny, “Adicto” in collaboration with Anuel AAandOzuna, and “I Can’t Get Enough,” for which he teamed up with Benny BlancoSelena Gomez and J Balvin

Tainy is currently nominated for best Latin rock, urban or alternative album at the 2020 Grammy Awardsfor his work on Bad Bunny’s X 100Preand on J Balvinand Bad Bunny’s joint album Oasis.

Rosalia Makes History with Grammy Nomination for Best New Artist

It’s a brand new (artist)day for Rosalia

The 26-year-old Spanish singer/songwriter has earned the first two Grammy nominations of her career, including a historic nod for Best New Artist.

Rosalia

Rosalia, a five-time Latin Grammy winner, is the first all-Spanish language singer to be nominated in the best new artist category. Other Latino artists have been nominated in the category over the years, including Vikki Carr in 1963, and Mariah CareyChristina Aguilera and Esperanza Spalding have won the award. Even José Feliciano won best new artist in 1969, bolstered by his hit version of the Doors’ “Light My Fire.” But the previous nominees and winners were not, however, honored for their work recorded exclusively in Spanish.

Rosalia’s second nomination comes in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for her second studio album, El Mal Querer. The album took home all the Latin Grammy awards it was nominated for, including Album of the Year, one of the top awards of the night.

Bad Bunny picked up two nominations… in the same category.

The 25-year-old Puerto Rican Latin trap and reggaeton singer-rapper is nominated in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for his Latin Grammy-winning debut album X 100PRE, as well as his collaborative album with J Balvin, Oasis.

Esperanza Spalding, a four-time Grammy winner, including Best New Artist, has picked up two nods this year. 

The 35-year-old part-Latinajazz bassist and singer is nominated in the Best Jazz Vocal Album category for her album12 Little Spells. She’s also up for Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals for serving as the arranger on her own single track “12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine).”

Vince Mendoza is back in familiar territory…

The 58-year-old Latino music arranger, conductorand composer, a multi-Grammy winner, has picked up four nominations. 

He’s nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for his work on Trisha Yearwood’s “Over The Rainbow.” 

Mendoza picked up two nods in the Best Instrumental Composition category for conducting Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band’s “Begin Again,” as well as composing “Love, A Beautiful Force,” his single with Terell StaffordDick Oatts and the Temple University Studio Orchestra.

Emilio Solla is in the running for a Grammy this year…

The Argentine pianist and composer is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella category for arranging “La Novena,” his single with the Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra.

Diego Figueiredo picked up a nod

The 39-year-old Brazilian musician is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for arrangement alongside Cyrille Aiméeon Aimée’s “Marry Me A Little.”

Camila Cabello, a two-time Grammy nominee last year, has earned a nod this year…

The 22-year-old Mexican and Cuban singer and former Fifth Harmony member is nominated in the Best Pop Duo/Group Performance category for her collaboration with Shawn Mendes, “Señorita.” 

Cardi B has earned a nod this year…

The 27-year-old half-Dominican American rap superstar, who picked up her first Grammy at this year’s awards show for her debut album Invasion of Privacy, is up for Best Rap Performance for her work opposite Offset on “Clout.”

Rodrigo y Gabrielahave reason to celebrate…

The Mexican acoustic guitar duo, comprised of Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero, picked up its first Grammy nomination. Rodrigo y Gabriela is nominated in the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album category for Mettavolution.

Jessie Reyez is a first-time Grammynominee…

The 28-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is nominated in the Best Urban Contemporary Album category for her sophomore album Being Human In Public. The album picked up a Juno Award in her home country of Canada for RnB/Soul Recording of the Year.

Sebastian Plano is celebrating his Grammy nod…

The Argentine composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist is nominated in the Best New Age Album category for his albumVerve.

Melissa Aldana has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 30-year-old Chilean tenor saxophone player is nominated in the Best Improvised Jazz Solo category for “Elsewhere.”

The nominees in the Best Latin Jazz Album include Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band (Antidote), Thalma De Freitas with Vitor GonçalvesJohn PatitucciChico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato Duduka Da Fonse (Sorte!: Music By John Finbury), Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Rubén Blades (Una Noche Con Rubén Blades), David Sánchez (Carib), and Miguel Zenón (Sonero: The Music of Ismael Rivera)

The Best Latin Pop Album nominees include an eclectic mix of artists: Luis Fonsi (Vida), Maluma (11:11), Ricardo Montaner (Montaner), Alejandro Sanz (#ELDISCO), and Sebastian Yatra (Fantasía).

In addition to Bad Bunny, J Balvin and Rosalia, the nominees in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category include Flor De Toloache (Indestructible) and iLe(Almadura).

The Best Regional Mexican Music Album (including Tejano) include Joss Favela (Caminando), Intocable (Percepción), La Energia Norteña (Poco A Poco), Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea (20 Aniversario), and Mariachi Los Camperos (De Ayer Para Siempre).

The Best Tropical Latin Album nominees include Marc Anthony (Opus), Luis Enrique + C4Trio (Tiempo Al Tiempo), Vicente Garcia (Candela), Juan Luis Guerra 4.40 (Literal) and Aymée Nuviola (A Journey Through Cuban Music).

The Best Musical Theater Album nominees includeHadestown, with Eva Noblezada as one of the principal soloists, and Moulin Rouge! The Musical, with Karen Olivo as one of the principal soloists. It’s the first Grammy nod for both Noblezada, who is half-Mexican American, and Olivo, who is part Puerto Rican and Dominican American.

Gustavo Dudamelis back in the hunt for a Grammy

The 38-year-oldVenezuelan-Spanish conductor and violinist, who won his first Grammy in 2011, is nominated in the Best Orchestral Performance category for conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonnic’s Norman: Sustain.”

FKA Twigs has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 31-year-old part-Spanish singer is up for Best Music Video for her acclaimed music video for “Cellophane.”

Lizzo led the pack with eight nods, while Billie Eillish and Lil Nas Xfollowed close behind with six nominations each. All three musicians are first-time Grammy nominees.

Alicia Keyswill return as host the ceremony for the second year in a row, making her the third womanand the first female musician to host the show twice.

The Grammy Awardswill take place on January 26 at the Staples Centerin Los Angeles. The broadcast will air live on CBSat 5:00 pm PT/ 8:00 pm ET.

Here’s a look at the categories with Latino nominees:

GENERAL FIELD

Best New Artist
Black Pumas
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Maggie Rogers
Rosalía
Tank and the Bangas
Yola

POP FIELD

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:
“Boyfriend” — Ariana Grande & Social House
“Sucker” — Jonas Brothers
“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus
“Señorita” — Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album:
Ancestral Recall — Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
Star People Nation — Theo Croker
Beat Music! Beat Music! Beat Music! — Mark Guiliana
Elevate — Lettuce
Mettavolution — Rodrigo y Gabriela

R&B

Best Urban Contemporary Album:
Apollo XXI — Steve Lacy
Cuz I Love You (Deluxe) — Lizzo
Overload — Georgia Anne Muldrow
Saturn — Nao
Being Human In Public — Jessie Reyez

RAP

Best Rap Performance:
“Middle Child” — J.Cole
“Suge” — DaBaby
“Down Bad” — Dreamville ft. J.I.D, Bas, J. Cole, Earthgang & Young Nudy
“Racks In The Middle” — Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy
“Clout” — Offset ft. Cardi B

NEW AGE

Best New Age Album:
Fairy Dreams — David Arkenstone
Homage To Kindness — David Darling
Wings — Peter Kater
Verve — Sebastian Plano
Deva — Deva Premal

JAZZ

Best Improvised Jazz Solo:
“Elsewhere” — Melissa Aldana, soloist
“Sozinho” — Randy Brecker, soloist
“Tomorrow Is The Question” — Julian Lage, soloist
“The Windup” — Brandford Marsalis, soloist
“Sightseeing” — Christian McBride, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album:
Thirsty Ghost — Sara Gazarek
Love & Liberation — Jazzmeia Horn
Alone Together — Catherine Russell
12 Little Spells — Esperanza Spalding
Screenplay — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Latin Jazz Album:
Antidote — Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band
Sorte!: Music By John Finbury — Thalma De Freitas With Vitor Gonçalves, John Patitucci, Chico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato & Duduka Da Fonseca
Una Noche Con Rubén Blades — Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis & Rubén Blades
Carib — David Sánchez
Sonero: The Music Of Ismael Rivera — Miguel Zenón

LATIN

Best Latin Pop Album:
Vida — Luis Fonsi
11:11 — Maluma
Montaner — Ricardo Montaner
#ELDISCO — Alejandro Sanz
Fantasía — Sebastian Yatra

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:
X 100PRE — Bad Bunny
Oasis — J Balvin & Bad Bunny
Indestructible — Flor De Toloache
Almadura — iLe
El Mal Querer – Rosalía

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano):
Caminando — Joss Favela
Percepción — Intocable
Poco A Poco — La Energia Norteña
20 Aniversario — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea
De Ayer Para Siempre — Mariachi Los Camperos

Best Tropical Latin Album:
Opus — Marc Anthony
Tiempo Al Tiempo — Luis Enrique + C4 Trio
Candela — Vicente García
Literal — Juan Luis Guerra 4.40
A Journey Through Cuban Music — Aymée Nuviola

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

Best American Roots Performance:
“Saint Honesty” — Sara Bareilles
“Father Mountain” — Calexico With Iron & Wine
“I’m On My Way” — Rhiannon Giddens With Francesco Turrisi
“Call My Name” — I’m With Her
“Faraway Look” — Yola

MUSICAL THEATER

Best Musical Theater Album:
Ain’t Too Proud: The Life And Times Of The Temptations — Saint Aubyn, Derrick Baskin, James Harkness, Jawan M. Jackson, Jeremy Pope & Ephraim Sykes, principal soloists; Scott M. Riesett, producer (Original Broadway Cast)
Hadestown — Reeve Carney, André De Shields, Amber Gray, Eva Noblezada & Patrick Page, principal soloists; Mara Isaacs, David Lai, Anaïs Mitchell & Todd Sickafoose, producers (Anaïs Mitchell, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)
Moulin Rouge! The Musical — Danny Burstein, Tam Mutu, Sahr Ngaujah, Karen Olivo & Aaron Tveit, principal soloists; Justin Levine, Baz Luhrmann, Matt Stine & Alex Timbers, producers (Original Broadway Cast)
The Music Of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child – In Four Contemporary Suites — Imogen Heap, producer; Imogen Heap, composer (Imogen Heap)
Oklahoma! — Damon Daunno, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Ali Stroker, Mary Testa & Patrick Vaill, principal soloists; Daniel Kluger & Dean Sharenow, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2019 Broadway Cast)

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:
The Lion King: The Songs — (Various Artists)
Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood — (Various Artists)
Rocketman — Taron Egerton
Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse — (Various Artists)
A Star Is Born — Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper

COMPOSING/ARRANGING

Best Instrumental Composition:
“Begin Again” — Fred Hersch, composer (Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band Conducted By Vince Mendoza)
“Crucible For Crisis” — Brian Lynch, composer (Brian Lynch Big Band)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite” — John Williams, composer (John Williams)
“Walkin’ Funny” — Christian McBride, composer (Christian McBride)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella:
“Blue Skies” — Kris Bowers, arranger (Kris Bowers)
“Hedwig’s Theme” — John Williams, arranger (Anne-Sophie Mutter & John Williams)
“La Novena” — Emilio Solla, arranger (Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Moon River” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:
“All Night Long” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier Featuring Jules Buckley, Take 6 & Metropole Orkest)
“Jolene” — Geoff Keezer, arranger (Sara Gazarek)
“Marry Me A Little” — Cyrille Aimée & Diego Figueiredo, arrangers (Cyrille Aimée)
“Over The Rainbow” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Trisha Yearwood)
“12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine)” — Esperanza Spalding, arranger (Esperanza Spalding)

PACKAGE

Best Recording Package:
Anónimas & Resilientes — Luisa María Arango, Carlos Dussan, Manuel García-Orozco & Juliana Jaramillo-Buenaventura, art directors (Voces Del Bullerengue)
Chris Cornell — Barry Ament, Jeff Ament, Jeff Fura & Joe Spix, art directors (Chris Cornell)
Hold That Tiger — Andrew Wong & Fongming Yang, art directors (The Muddy Basin Ramblers)
i,i — Aaron Anderson & Eric Timothy Carlson, art directors (Bon Iver)
Intellexual — Irwan Awalludin, art director (Intellexual)

NOTES

Best Album Notes:
The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions — Judy Cantor-Navas, album notes writer (Various Artists)
The Gospel According To Malaco — Robert Marovich, album notes writer (Various Artists)
Pedal Steel + Four Corners — Brendan Greaves, album notes writer (Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band)
Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection — Jeff Place, album notes writer (Pete Seeger)
Stax ’68: A Memphis Story — Steve Greenberg, album notes writer (Various Artists)

CLASSICAL

Best Orchestral Performance:
“Bruckner: Symphony No. 9” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)
“Copland: Billy The Kid; Grohg” — Leonard Slatkin, conductor (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
“Norman: Sustain” — Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)
“Transatlantic” — Louis Langrée, conductor (Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra)
“Weinberg: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21” — Mirga Gražinytė-tyla, conductor (City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra & Kremerata Baltica)

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

Best Music Video:
“We’ve Got To Try” — The Chemical Brothers, Ellie Fry, video director; Ninian Doff, video producer
“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Savanah Leaf, video director; Alicia Martinez, video producer
“Cellophane” — FKA twigs, Andrew Thomas Huang, video director; Alex Chamberlain, video producer
“Old Town Road (Official Movie)” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus, Calmatic, video director; Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, video producers
“Glad He’s Gone” — Tove Lo,  Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Natan Schottenfels, video producer

Jennifer Lopez Wears “The Dress” at Versace’s Spring 2020 Show 20 Years After Owning the Grammys Red Carpet

It’s a blast from the past for Jennifer Lopez… 

The 50-year-old Puerto Rican superstar and Hustlers actress closed out Versace‘s Spring 2020 show in a re-worked version of the revealing, bright green silk chiffon dress she donned at the Grammy Awards 20 years ago.

Jennifer Lopez - Versace Dress

The dress quickly became a pop-culture phenomenon, causing complications for Google after too many people searched the combination of J-Lo and Versace at the time of the awards.

The dress even led to the creation of Google Images after it became clear that users were interested in finding photos on the internet, rather than simply text.

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt confirmed in a 2015 essay that the need for photo aggregation “first became apparent after the 2000 Grammy Awards, where Jennifer Lopez wore a green dress that, well, caught the world’s attention.”

“At the time,” Schmidt continued, “it was the most popular search query we had ever seen. But we had no surefire way of getting users exactly what they wanted: J.Lo wearing that dress. Google Image Search was born.”

And, according to a video of the runway walk that Lopez posted on Instagram, the significance of the dress clearly wasn’t lost on the attendees. Almost every audience member can be seen holding up their phones to capture the nostalgic moment, while audible cheers can be heard.

Donatella Versace, at the helm of the Italian fashion brand, told Vogue that the two had hatched the plan when they met at this year’s Met Ball. “The world stopped, everyone wanted to look at that dress… I’m proud we inspired Google Images,” Versace said. “You know when I do something, I really do it.”

Raul Malo & The Mavericks Cover Freddy Fender’s Classic “Before the Next Teardrop Falls”

Raul Malo is celebrating his band’s anniversary with the help of a Latino country music legend…

The 54-year-old Cuban American country singer/guitarist and his The Mavericks mates have covered Freddy Fender’s iconic “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” for their next album.

Raul Malo & The Mavericks

The band recorded the late singer’s song because the track holds special meaning to frontman Malo.

“When I was a kid, that song meant a lot to me, and it meant a lot to my dad,” Malo tells Billboard of the song, a platinum 1975 single for Fender, one of only a half-dozen songs that year to top both the Billboard Hot 100 and the Hot Country Singlescharts. 

“We would be driving around Miami listening to it, and I remember it being a really proud moment whenever it was played. Even though my family’s Cuban and Freddy’s Mexican, just the fact there was a Latin male on the pop charts and on TV singing this beautiful song, it was a source of pride.”

Malo adds, “It had a verse in Spanish, and it was on the pop charts and on the country charts. You think, ‘My gosh, how does that happen?’ Of course, those are the mysteries of the music business. That’s why we love it and hate it at the same time, but [the song] was a sweet miracle, for sure.”

Malo says “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” will be part of a covers set due out this fall, likely late October or early November, that commemorates the Mavericks’ 30th anniversary, which the group has been touring to celebrate all year. The genre-hopping group has already released a rendition of John Anderson‘s “Swingin‘,” and Malo says the rest of the album will feature “a collection of songs that have meant something to us — there are some classic country music songs in there, obviously, and there’s a few surprises thrown in there for good measure.”

The group is continuing to play live and celebrate an eclectic, idiosyncratic career that began with three straight top 10 country albums and a Grammy Award, as well as a resumption in 2012 — following an eight-year hiatus — that’s  brought four more albums and the launch of the group’s own Mono Mundo Recordings label in 2017.

“I feel like an old vampire that has all this wisdom, but I’m still in the game and it’s been an amazing ride,” Malo says. “The Mavericks have been counted out, almost sort of the outsider. That’s been frustrating, but I realized a while ago it’s a good place to be, and we can turn that to our advantage however we want to. I like the paths we’ve taken, and our willingness to take chances. When you live a little outside the rules and outside of the game, you can really do whatever you want. That’s what works for us and what works for our fans as well.”

Angela Aguilar Releases Cover of Lady Gaga/Bradley Cooper’s “Shallow” as Part of Grammy Reimagines Series

Angela Aguilar has found herself deep in the shallow…

The 15-year-old Mexican-American singeris the latest artist to join the Recording Academy’s Grammy ReImagines video series. 

Angela Aguilar

With her crisp, sweet voice and white-painted fingernails tapping the piano, the Latin Grammy nominee performs an enchanting version of Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s “Shallow” from A Star Is Born.

A new installment of the series, featuring artists like, COASTCITYMadison Beer and La Santa Cecilia, aims to bring a fresh take on classic Grammy-winning/nominated songs by their favorite artists.

In March, “Shallow” blasted from No. 21 to No. 1 for its first week atop the Billboard Hot 100 songs chart, becoming Lady Gaga’s fourth Hot 100No. 1 and Cooper’s first. 

The 2018 song won best pop/duo group performance and best song written for visual media at the 61st Grammy Awards in February. Aguilar, the daughter of Pepe Aguilar, has been nominated for a Grammy Award and two Latin Grammy Awards, becoming one of the youngest artists nominated for both awards

Cardi B Makes Rap History While Winning First-Ever Grammy Award

It’s official! Cardi Bis a Grammy winner…

The 26-year-old half-Dominican American rap sensation, a five-time nominee at this year’s Grammy Awards show, didn’t leave empty-handed.

Cardi B

Cardi B took home the award for Best Rap Album for chart-topping debut album Invasion of Privacy, becoming the first woman to win the prize.

50-year-old Argentine Singer/songwriter Claudia Brant, who has built a career as one of the top songwriters in Latin music, won as a performer in the Best Latin Pop Albumcategory for Sincera, a collection of personal, heartfelt songs set to acoustic, Brazilian-tinged arrangements, courtesy of producers/engineers Cheche Alaraand Moogie Canazio. 

The Best Latin Rock/Alternative/Urban Albumwent to Mexican band Zoé’s Aztlan in a hard to predict category where the alternative sounds of Monsiuer Perinéand the urban sounds of Orishas also stood a good chance of winning. 

There were no big commercial releases in the Best Tropical Albumcategory, which went to critically acclaimed Spanish Harlem Orchestrafor Anniversary

The only fully expected win was Luis Miguel’s, for his Latin Grammywinning ¡México Por Siempre!

Earlier in the evening, Lucy Kalantari, who won Best Children’s Albumfor All The Sounds by Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats, gave a shout out to her mom in Dominican Republic.

“This album was recorded by a Latina woman. It was produced by a woman,” she said.

Here are the artists, albums and songs that received awards.

Record of the Year
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Album of the Year
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Song of the Year
“This Is America” — Donald Glover and Ludwig Goransson, songwriters (Childish Gambino)

Best New Artist
Dua Lipa

Best Pop Solo Performance
“Joanne (Where Do You Think You’re Goin’?)” — Lady Gaga

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Best Pop Vocal Album
“Sweetener” — Ariana Grande

Best Rock Performance
“When Bad Does Good” — Chris Cornell

Best Rock Song
“Masseduction” — Jack Antonoff and Annie Clark, songwriters (St. Vincent)

Best Rock Album
“From the Fires” — Greta Van Fleet

Best Alternative Music Album
“Colors” — Beck

Best R&B Performance
“Best Part” — H.E.R. featuring Daniel Caesar

Best Urban Contemporary Album
“Everything Is Love” — The Carters

Best R&B Album
“H.E.R.” — H.E.R.

Best Rap Performance
“King’s Dead” — Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future and James Blake and “Bubblin” — Anderson .Paak

Best Rap Song
“God’s Plan” — Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Brock Korsan, Ron LaTour, Matthew Samuels and Noah Shebib, songwriters (Drake)

Best Rap Album
“Invasion of Privacy” — Cardi B

Best Country Solo Performance
“Butterflies” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Country Album
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Jazz Instrumental Album
“Emanon” — The Wayne Shorter Quartet

Best Latin Pop Album
“Sincera” — Claudia Brant

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album
“Aztlán” — Zoé

Best Americana Album
“By the Way, I Forgive You” — Brandi Carlile

Best Song Written for Visual Media
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando and Andrew Wyatt, songwriters (Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Pharrell Williams

Best Music Video
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Best Comedy Album
“Equanimity & the Bird Revelation” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album
“The Band’s Visit” — Etai Benson, Adam Kantor, Katrina Lenk and Ari’el Stachel, principal soloists; Dean Sharenow and David Yazbek, producers; David Yazbek, composer and lyricist

Best Instrumental Composition
“Blut Und Boden (Blood and Soil)” — Terence Blanchard

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella
“Stars and Stripes Forever” — John Daversa

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals
“Spiderman Theme” — Mark Kibble, Randy Waldman and Justin Wilson, arrangers

Best Recording Package
“Masseduction” — Willo Perron, art director

Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package
“Squeeze Box: The Complete Works of ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic” — Meghan Foley, Annie Stoll and Al Yankovic, art directors

Best Album Notes
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — David Evans, album notes writer

Best Historical Album
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — William Ferris, April Ledbetter and Steven Lance Ledbetter, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
“Colors” — Julian Burg, Serban Ghenea, David “Elevator” Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin, Florian Lagatta, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco, Jesse Shatkin, Darrell Thorp and Cassidy Turbin, engineers; Chris Bellman, Tom Coyne, Emily Lazar and Randy Merrill, mastering engineers

Best Remixed Recording
“Walking Away (Mura Masa remix)” — Alex Crossan, remixer

Best Immersive Audio Album
“Eye in the Sky – 35th Anniversary Edition” — Alan Parsons, surround mix engineer; Dave Donnelly, P.J. Olsson and Alan Parsons, surround mastering engineers; Alan Parsons, surround producer

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album
“Steve Gadd Band” — Steve Gadd

Band Best Gospel Performance/Song
“Never Alone” — Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin and Victoria Kelly, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“You Say” — Lauren Daigle; Lauren Daigle, Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, songwriters

Best Gospel Album
“Hiding Place” — Tori Kelly

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
“Look Up Child” — Lauren Daigle

Best Roots Gospel Album
“Unexpected” — Jason Crabb

Best World Music Album
“Freedom” — Soweto Gospel Choir

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media
“The Greatest Showman” — Hugh Jackman (and Various Artists); Alex Lacamoire, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul and Greg Wells, compilation producers

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
“Black Panther” — Ludwig Göransson, composer

Best New Age Album
 “Opium Moon” — Opium Moon

Best American Roots Performance
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile

Best American Roots Song
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile, Dave Cobb, Phil Hanseroth and Tim Hanseroth, songwriters

Best Bluegrass Album
“The Travelin’ Mccourys” — The Travelin’ Mccourys

Best Traditional Blues Album
“The Blues Is Alive and Well” — Buddy Guy

Best Contemporary Blues Album
“Please Don’t Be Dead” — Fantastic Negrito

Best Folk Album
“All Ashore” — Punch Brothers

Best Children’s Album
“All the Sounds” — Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling)
“Faith – A Journey for All” — Jimmy Carter

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)
“¡México Por Siempre!” — Luis Miguel

Best Tropical Latin Album
“Anniversary” — Spanish Harlem Orchestra

Best Regional Roots Music Album
“No ‘Ane’i” — Kalani Pe’a

Best Music Film
“Quincy” — Quincy Jones; Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones, video directors; Paula Dupré Pesmen, video producer

Best Country Duo/Group Performance
“Tequila” — Dan + Shay

Best Country Song
“Space Cowboy” — Luke Laird, Shane Mcanally and Kacey Musgraves, songwriters

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album
“My Way” — Willie Nelson

Best Engineered Album, Classical
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Shawn Murphy and Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer

Producer of the Year, Classical
Blanton Alspaugh

Best Orchestral Performance
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Andris Nelsons, conductor

Best Opera Recording
“Bates: The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs” — Michael Christie, conductor; Sasha Cooke, Jessica E. Jones, Edward Parks, Garrett Sorenson and Wei Wu; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer

Best Choral Performance
“Mcloskey: Zealot Canticles” — Donald Nally, conductor

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance
“Anderson, Laurie: Landfall” — Laurie Anderson and Kronos Quartet

Best Classical Instrumental Solo
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — James Ehnes; Ludovic Morlot, conductor

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album
“Songs of Orpheus – Monteverdi, Caccini, D’india & Landi” — Karim Sulayman; Jeannette Sorrell, conductor; Apollo’s Fire, ensembles

Best Classical Compendium
“Fuchs: Piano Concerto ‘spiritualist’; Poems of Life; Glacier; Rush” — Joann Falletta, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — Aaron Jay Kernis, composer

Best Dance Recording
“Electricity” — Silk City and Dua Lipa featuring Diplo and Mark Ronson

Best Dance/Electronic Album
“Woman Worldwide” — Justice

Best Reggae Album
“44/876” — Sting and Shaggy

Best Improvised Jazz Solo
“Don’t Fence Me In” — John Daversa, soloist. Track from: “American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom”

Best Jazz Vocal Album
“The Window” — Cécile Mclorin Salvant

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album
“American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom” — John Daversa Big Band featuring DACA Artists

Best Latin Jazz Album
“Back to the Sunset” — Dafnis Prieto Big Band

Best Traditional R&B Performance
“Bet Ain’t Worth the Hand” — Leon Bridges and “How Deep Is Your Love” — PJ Morton featuring Yebba

Best R&B Song
“Boo’d Up” — Larrance Dopson, Joelle James, Ella Mai and Dijon Mcfarlane, songwriters

Best Metal Performance
“Electric Messiah” — High on Fire

Best Rap/Sung Performance
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Camila Cabello Kicks Off Grammy Awards Show with Sizzling Performance of “Havana”

Camila Cabello is Havana great time at the Grammys

The 21-year-old Cuban and Mexican singer kicked off the 2019 Grammy Awards with flash and style, and a show-opening blast of Latin pop saborduring a steamy performance of “Havana” that included J Balvin, Ricky Martin, Young Thug and legendary Cuban-American jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval.

Camila Cabello

The performance, which included cameos from her abuela, sister and parents, opened with a brightly colored set dressed to look like a street in Cuba, serving as an homage to the jams that took place on the patio at Cabello’s grandmother’s childhood home in Havana.

With extras scattered about dancing, banging on improvised percussion, playing dice and hanging on the corner, Cabello — wearing a yellow skirt and matching bikini top that echoed the hue of her dress in the “Havana” video — stripped off a red robe as a friend primped her inside a pink-lit bedroom.

Making her way to a green room next door, Cabello threw in some Spanglish riffs as the neighbor downstairs banged on the ceiling, even as the singer made her way down a fire escape to join a group of dancers in primary colored dresses swinging colorful bandanas. Dropping a yellow one, Cabello caught the attention of Thug, who strolled up in bejeweled tux with silver boots for a verse backed by a group of loose-hipped male and female dancers.

The street jam heated up as Martin shimmied out in a white suit and spun Cabello around and the stage exploded in a riot of sensual salseros. Sandoval took a bleating solo, segueing smoothly into J Balvin’s spotlight, which opened with him sitting on a park bench reading a paper with the pointed headline “Build Bridges Not Walls.”

J Balvin, wearing a red track suit, asked where his people were in Spanish, as he joined Cabello and Martin center stage to soak in the the standing ovation.

Havana (Live)” was up for best pop solo performance tonight, though Cabello lost to Lady Gaga.

Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee’s “Despacito” Ties Record for Most Weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot Latin Songs Chart

The tie’s the limit for Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee.

The 39-year-old Puerto Rican singer/songwriter and the 41-year-old rapper’s global phenomenon “Despacito,” featuring Justin Bieber, has tied the record for the most weeks spent at No. 1 in the history of Billboard‘s Hot Latin Songs chart, as it logs its 41st week on top (on the ranking dated February 10).

Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee

The track matches the 41-week reign of Enrique Iglesias‘ “Bailando,” featuring Descemer Bueno and Gente de Zona, in 2014-15.

“My goal has always been to make good songs that people enjoy and perform them with passion and honesty,” Fonsi tells Billboard. “To break or tie records, although it is not the priority, is a sign that people feel that connection. Being a small part of the history of Latin music is a real honor.”

“Despacito” first led Hot Latin Songs (which blends streaming, airplay and sales data) almost a year ago, rising to its first week at No. 1 on the Feb. 18, 2017-dated chart.

It spent 35 consecutive weeks at No. 1 and then ceded the top spot to J Balvin and Willy Willliam‘s “Mi Gente,” featuring Beyoncé, for 12 weeks, beginning  October 21.

“Despacito” then returned for another six weeks at No. 1 (so far).

On the all-genre Billboard Hot 100, “Despacito” spent 16 weeks at No. 1, tying Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men‘s “One Sweet Day” (in 1995-96) for the longest command in the chart’s 59-year history.

Helping “Despacito” on the most recent Hot Latin Songs chart: Fonsi and Daddy Yankee gave a high octane performance of the smash at the Grammy Awards on January 28, sparking a 9 percent gain to 16.8 million U.S. streams and 154 percent surge to 30,000 downloads sold in the week ending February 1, according to Nielsen Music.

Here’s a look at the hits with the longest all-time reigns on Hot Latin Songs (dating to the chart’s October 4, 1986, inception).

Most Weeks at No. 1 on Hot Latin Songs:
Weeks at No. 1, Title, Artist, Date Reached No. 1
41 weeks, “Despacito,” Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee feat. Justin Bieber, Feb. 18, 2017
41 weeks, “Bailando,” Enrique Iglesias feat. Descemer Bueno & Gente de Zona, May 17, 2014
30 weeks, “El Perdón,” Nicky Jam & Enrique Iglesias, March 21, 2015
25 weeks, “La Tortura,” Shakira feat. Alejandro Sanz, June 4, 2005
22 weeks, “Ginza,” J Balvin, Oct, 17, 2015
20 weeks, “Te Quiero,” Flex, April 5, 2008
20 weeks, “Me Enamora,” Juanes, Sept. 29, 2007
20 weeks, “A Puro Dolor,” Son by Four, April 1, 2000