Pabllo Vittar Releases First English-Only Single “Flash Pose,” Featuring Charli XCX

Pabllo Vittar has released her first-ever single sung entirely in English.

The 24-year-old Brazilian singer and drag artist has joined voices with longtime collaborator Charli XCX on “Flash Pose.”

Pabllo Vittar

Touted as the first single off her upcoming album 111, “Flash Pose” is an infectious club anthem that feels eminently danceable, fun as hell and offers a new take on classic Pabllo-sounds. 

“Come over, come over baby/ Come in my picture, that’s right/ Because I wasn’t trying to get a nice picture by myself!” Vittar sings wickedly.

“I can’t describe the feeling — I am super excited! This is my first song in English and I have my friend Charli with me,” Vittar tells Billboard. “I couldn’t be happier right now.”

Vittar, who’s known for creating modern dancehall tracks in both Portuguese and Spanish, has become increasingly popular Stateside, even among non-multilingual listeners. 

Her fresh take on international pop music as well as her powerful message of queer empowerment — she’s an outspoken critic of Brazil’s conservative president, Jair Bolsonaro— has won her powerful accolades and brought her performances to Pride festivities across the U.S., including a headlining spot on Pride Island during WorldPride NYC 2019. 

“We have to show those kinds of people that you can be who you want and do whatever you want, as long as you respect other people’s space and feelings,” says Vittar. “I am not hurting anyone, I am trying to do my share to make a better world for everyone. I am an LGBTQ artist and I am proud of it, and no one can tell me what I can or cannot do.”

With her popularity in North America growing, it makes sense that Vittar’s next move would be to release an English-language song.

Gabriel Jesus Leads Brazil to Copa America Title

Gabriel Jesus is being hailed a hero in his home country…

The 22-year-old Brazilian professional footballer, a forward for Premier League club Manchester City and the Brazil national team, scored and assisted on goals before being sent off in Brazil‘s 3-1 win over Peru in the Copa America final on Sunday in Rio de Janeiro.

Gabriel Jesus

The hosts opened the scoring in the 15th minute after Jesus slipped past two defenders and crossed the ball for Everton to finish first time past Peru keeper Pedro Gallese.

The two teams traded goals right before halftime with Paolo Guerreroconverting a spot kick for Peru after Thiago Silva was whistled for handball and Jesus cooly finishing from the top of the penalty area to restore Brazil’s lead at 2-1 before the break.

Peru had not won this tournament since 1975 and they bounced back quickly with an equalizer a minute before halftime when Paolo Guerrero scored from the penalty spot after Silva was adjudged to have handled the ball.

The goal was the first Brazil had conceded in six games since the Copa America began.

Jesus was controversially sent off in the 70th minute for a foul on Carlos Zambrano with the Man Citystriker being shown his second yellow card and leaving Brazil to finish the match with 10 players.

“I want to apologize,” said Jesus. “I could have avoided it and I also need to grow up a lot.”

Despite being down a man, Brazil was still able to force the issue on the field and goalscorer Everton drew a penalty, which substitute Richarlison converted to give Brazil their ninth Copa America title and first major trophy since 2007.

Peru coach Ricardo Garecarecognized Brazil was the superior side but said his team, who played at their first World Cupin 36 years in 2018, were competitive throughout.

“It was fair that Brazil won,” he said. “We had our momentum but the second goal…

“They took advantage of their opportunities.

“We came here hoping to win but they were very effective,” he added. “But looking beyond the pain of the defeat, I think we are on the right path, that is the feeling that I have.”

An injured Neymar and his son sat close to Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro among the crowd of nearly 70,000 at the Maracana as the Selecao secured a historic one for Brazil manager Tite, who becomes the first coach to oversee a win in the Copa America, the Copa Libertadores( Corinthians, 2012) and the Copa Sudamericana(Internacional, 2008).

Caetano Veloso Pens New York Times Op-Ed on the Possible Breakdown of Democracy in Brazil

Caetano Veloso is speaking out about the political turmoil in his beloved Brazil…

The 76-year-old Brazilian musician and political activist has published an op-ed in the New York Times about the possible breakdown of democracy his home country is facing.

Caetano Veloso

A two-time Grammy winner, Veloso gaimed acclaim through participating in the Tropicalismo artistic movement at the beginning of the military dictatorship that Brazil (the fourth-largest democracy in the world) operated under in the 1960s.

In the editorial, titled “Dark Times Are Coming for My Country,” Caetano writes about the populist right-wing conservatism influencing Brazilian politics, and claims that Brazilians “can expect a wave of fear and hatred” if projected election winner Jair Bolsonaro becomes president. The election is scheduled for Sunday, October 28.

“Like other countries around the world, Brazil is facing a threat from the far right, a storm of populist conservatism,” Caetano says. “Our new political phenomenon, Jair Bolsonaro…is a former army captain who admires Donald Trump but seems more like Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippines’ strongman. Mr. Bolsonaro champions the unrestricted sale of firearms, proposes a presumption of self-defense if a policeman kills a “suspect” and declares that a dead son is preferable to a gay one.”

Caetano goes on to provide background information about the decline of Brazilian political life in recent years, the impact of the news media on Bolsonaro’s success, and his history of artistic activism. Caetano spent time in prison for his political beliefs, along with other artists, students, and intellectuals.

Caetano ends the piece by expressing that he was forced into exile before, but won’t see that happen a second time, saying “I want my music, my presence, to be a permanent resistance to whatever anti-democratic feature may come out of a probable Bolsonaro government.”

Read the op-ed in full here.