Carlos Vives Performs 21-Minute Set as Part of NPR Music’s Tiny Desk At-Home Concerts

Carlos Vives is putting his desk foot forward…

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is the latest artist to appear as part of NPR Music’s Tiny Desk at-home concerts, bringing his Colombian flavors to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Carlos Vives

During his 21-minute set earlier this week, during which he was joined by a seven-member band, including his longtime backup vocalist and gaita player, Mayte Montero, Vives kicked off things off with his 1995 hit “Pa’ Mayte,” showcasing the spirited champeta dance.

He then performed one of his newer records, “Cumbiana,” dedicated to the diverse community of Colombia, his Shakira-assisted bop “La Bicicleta,” and the infectious “No Te Vayas,” released earlier this year — all while dancing barefoot in the comfort of his own home.

“On this Tiny Desk during this quarantine, we have written most of the songs for our new album, Cumbiana Vol. 2, next to our producer Andres Leal and Martin Velilla,” says the six-time 2020 Latin Grammy nominee during his performance.

Vives is confirmed to speak at the 2020 Billboard Latin Music Week taking place October 20 to October 23. He’ll be joined by internationally renowned Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel, music and artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, in an enlightening conversation on the power of music and the arts as a global agent of change for a better society.

 

The new Tiny Desk (home) concerts, which have featured special guests like Billie Eilish and BTS, are “the same spirit — stripped-down sets, an intimate setting — just a different space.”

Café Tacvba Performs Four Original Songs at the NPR Music Tiny Desk Stage

Café Tacvba doesn’t need a large stage to make an impact…

The five-piece Mexican band brightened the NPR Music Tiny Desk stage with four original songs in a performance released on Friday.

Café Tacvba 

Café Tacvba brought an arsenal of instruments into the cozy space, including ukuleles, guitars, drums, a bass and a melodica.

They opened with the lively “Olita del Altamar,” with singer Rubén Ortega, donning a blue kimono and two top knots, hopping around the setup centered behind a desk in a book-filled office during the song as he joyfully sang in his signature ragged voice.

The group followed with the noticeably more relaxed “Diente de León,” during which Ortega closed his eyes and raised his hands, getting lost in the gentle guitar strumming and warm drum beats.

Las Flores” flipped the script with an energetic tempo, which inspired the whole room to clap along to the fun ska groove. The band closed their set with “Que No,” an easygoing ballad about love and moving on.