Carlos Vives Performs 21-Minute Set as Part of NPR Music’s Tiny Desk At-Home Concerts

Carlos Vives is putting his desk foot forward…

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is the latest artist to appear as part of NPR Music’s Tiny Desk at-home concerts, bringing his Colombian flavors to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Carlos Vives

During his 21-minute set earlier this week, during which he was joined by a seven-member band, including his longtime backup vocalist and gaita player, Mayte Montero, Vives kicked off things off with his 1995 hit “Pa’ Mayte,” showcasing the spirited champeta dance.

He then performed one of his newer records, “Cumbiana,” dedicated to the diverse community of Colombia, his Shakira-assisted bop “La Bicicleta,” and the infectious “No Te Vayas,” released earlier this year — all while dancing barefoot in the comfort of his own home.

“On this Tiny Desk during this quarantine, we have written most of the songs for our new album, Cumbiana Vol. 2, next to our producer Andres Leal and Martin Velilla,” says the six-time 2020 Latin Grammy nominee during his performance.

Vives is confirmed to speak at the 2020 Billboard Latin Music Week taking place October 20 to October 23. He’ll be joined by internationally renowned Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel, music and artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, in an enlightening conversation on the power of music and the arts as a global agent of change for a better society.

 

The new Tiny Desk (home) concerts, which have featured special guests like Billie Eilish and BTS, are “the same spirit — stripped-down sets, an intimate setting — just a different space.”

Carlos Vives Launching “El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana” Documentary in Partnership with Grammy Museum

Carlos Vives is celebrating Colombia’s indigenous roots in music in a special way…

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is launching a special documentary, El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana, this Friday, August 21 on the Grammy Museum’s digital museum.

Carlos Vives

In May, Vives released his 14th studio album, Cumbiana, which married Colombia’s past with the future. The album shed light on the indigenous roots of Colombian music in a 10-set production that includes collaborations with Jessie Reyez, Alejandro Sanz, Ruben Blades and others.

Vives decided to bring his extensive research and musical exploration to the masses via the documentary, which is directed by Carlos Felipe Montoya and produced by Isabel Cristina Vasquez from Mestiza Films.

Vives spotlights the history of the amphibian universe to better understand the origins of cumbia and vallenato music, the ancestral spirits that inspired his latest production, and the environmental challenges the Magdalena River ecosystem is facing.

“I discovered a lost world. That’s the truth,” Vives previously told Billboard.

“We’ve always spoken about our African heritage in music. We’ve always thought that the most uplifting elements of our music came from Africa or from European rhythms like polka. But it turns out it comes from Andean or indigenous music. This album highlights the joy of the fusion of African, European, and indigenous music.”

El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana, which also elaborates on the creative process of Cumbiana, will be available at 1:00 pm PT on Friday, August 21 at the Grammy Museum website for 72 hours only.

Following the screening, Vives will attend an exclusive conversation with NPR Alt Latino’s Felix Contreras to further discuss the documentary.

Mandy Gonzalez to Perform on PBS’ Virtual Independence Day Concert, “A Capitol Fourth”

Mandy Gonzalez has found her Independence

The 41-year-old half Mexican American actress/singer, best known for her leading roles on Broadway, will perform on PBS’ virtual Independence Day concert, A Capitol Fourth.

Mandy Gonzalez

Due to the continued coronavirus pandemic, PBS opted for a virtual Fourth of July event, instead of cancelling it completely.

A Capitol Fourth, now in its 40th year, will feature pre-taped performances from around the country, hosted by John Stamos and Vanessa Williams.

In addition to Gonzalez, who played Elphaba in the Broadway production of Wicked and originated the role of Nina Rosario in the Off-Broadway and Broadway productions of the musical In the Heights, performers include Patti LaBelleJohn FogertyRenee Fleming,The TemptationsTrace AdkinsAndy GrammerYolanda Adams, Brantley GilbertLauren AlainaBrian Stokes-MitchellKelli O’Hara, and members of the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Jack Everly.

Segments for the eventare being pre-taped, and the special also will feature highlights from previous years.

The 90-minute show also will feature a tribute by Stamos to workers on the front lines of the coronavirus crisis, with Chrissy Metz singing I’m Standing with You.

There will also be segments honoring African American heroes from the past and present, and a salute to wounded warriors. A live segment of the special will feature the annual fireworks display over the D.C. skyline.

“For four decades A Capitol Fourth has paid tribute to our nation’s birthday and the hopes and dreams of all Americans,” said executive producer Michael Colbert. “This year, our broadcast will reflect the reality of what we as a country have faced and the challenges ahead, while showcasing our message of inclusion, patriotism and love.”

The special will air on PBS on July 4 at 8:00 pm ET, and will be heard on the American Forces Network and in stereo over NPR member stations.  The concert also will be streamed on FacebookYouTube and PBS.org and will be available on demand from July 4-18.

Soledad O’Brien Named to Peabody Board of Directors

Soledad O’Brien is on board

In an effort to advance the organization’s commitment to storytelling, Peabody has appointed six new members to its bicoastal board of directors, including the 53-year-old half-Afro-Cuban American journalist.

Soledad O'Brien

Joining O’Brien, a presenter on HBO’s Real Sportsand host of Hearst Television’s Matter Of Fact with Soledad O’Brien, on the board are Chris McCarthyViacomCBS’ newly appointed president of entertainment and youth brands, and ESPN’s executive vice president of content, Connor Schell.

NPReditorial director Nancy Barnesand UnivisionCommunications’ executive vice president of government and corporate affairs Jessica Herrera-Flaniganhave also joined the board.

The five executives will serve on Peabody’s East Coast board, with the sixth new arrival, CAApartner Steven Lafferty, joining the organization’s West Coast board.

The bicoastal boards are distinct from the traditional board of jurors, which hands out the Peabody Awards. Existing board members include Vicechief Nancy DubucPBS CEO Paula Kergerand Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos.

Peabody executive director Jeffrey Jonessaid: “The intellectual capital and energy our boards bring is unparalleled, and we are excited to welcome these new members as they help us extend our reach through new partnerships and public engagements.”

Lau Noah Enchants During NPR “Tiny Desk Concert”

Lau Noah is having a Tiny moment…

The Spanish singer-songwriter and guitarist, among a new wave of Spanish artists making their mark globally, is the latest act to give a Tiny Desk Concert at the National Public Radio offices.

Lau Noah

Noah, who is enchanting music lovers one song at a time, flaunted her poetic lyrics and magical flamencoguitar riffs in a nearly 16-minute set that included five songs, wrapping with “La Realidad.”

According to NPR, she speaks and sings in Catalan, Spanish, English and sometimes Hebrew. She played the piano growing up and left Spain for New York City five years ago while still a teen.

“There’s a language we speak in the Northeast of Spain called Catalan in a region called Catalonia, this is where I come from,” she said during her performance before delivering her song “L’Adéu.” “And for many years I only sang in English because I was too scared of what they would say if I sang in my mother language. I’m not anymore. I’m really happy to share a song in Catalan with you.”

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/08/692656041/lau-noah-tiny-desk-concert?jwsource=cl

Café Tacvba Performs Four Original Songs at the NPR Music Tiny Desk Stage

Café Tacvba doesn’t need a large stage to make an impact…

The five-piece Mexican band brightened the NPR Music Tiny Desk stage with four original songs in a performance released on Friday.

Café Tacvba 

Café Tacvba brought an arsenal of instruments into the cozy space, including ukuleles, guitars, drums, a bass and a melodica.

They opened with the lively “Olita del Altamar,” with singer Rubén Ortega, donning a blue kimono and two top knots, hopping around the setup centered behind a desk in a book-filled office during the song as he joyfully sang in his signature ragged voice.

The group followed with the noticeably more relaxed “Diente de León,” during which Ortega closed his eyes and raised his hands, getting lost in the gentle guitar strumming and warm drum beats.

Las Flores” flipped the script with an energetic tempo, which inspired the whole room to clap along to the fun ska groove. The band closed their set with “Que No,” an easygoing ballad about love and moving on.

Cooking Channel Renews Rocca’s “My Grandmother’s Ravioli” for Third Season

Get ready to spend Mo (Rocca) time in the kitchen…

The Cooking Channel has ordered another season of the 44-year-old half-Colombian comedian and journalist’s series My Grandmother’s Ravioli.

Mo Rocca

The Rocca-created and -hosted show will return for 13 more episodes in late 2014, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The series, inspired by the Sunday family dinners Rocca grew up enjoying at his grandmother’s house, follows him as he visits grandparents across North America who introduce him to their most treasured family recipes.

“Mo Rocca is a deft storyteller, and though he shouldn’t necessarily be left to his own devices in the kitchen, under the watchful eye of America’s grandparents, it makes for a delicious recipe for television,” said Cooking Channel’s general manager and senior vice president Michael Smith.

Rocca, a correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, says viewers can expect more diverse dishes, locations and couples in the coming season. After featuring several “sweet, warm grandparents” on the series, Rocca is ready to spice up the cast. “We want cranky, crusty grandparents who will really ride me,” he quipped to THR.

So which grandparents who he most like to spend time with in the kitchen? The stoic farmer couple in the painting “American Gothic.”

“The best grandparents are the ones who probably have never seen the show and are definitely not interested in being on a reality show,” Rocca tells THR. “Usually volunteered by their kids and their grandkids, they’re people who just kind of do their own thing, spend time with their families and cook.”

Casting for season three has just begun, and grandparents can be nominated here.

With three episodes remaining in season two, the show will feature its first gay couple on January 8. The series currently airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m.

Rocca is also a panelist on NPR‘s Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me! and host of Cooking Channel’s Food(ography).

Maria Hinojosa Wins John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism

She’s used to reporting the news… But this time around, Maria Hinojosa is making headlines for her noted journalism career.

The 51-year-old Mexican-born journalist has been named the winner of the 2012 John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism, announced Columbia University‘s Graduate School of Journalism on Wednesday.

Maria Hinojosa

Hinojosa, who has already won three Emmys for her work in television news, is a prominent member of the Hispanic journalistic community in the United States, after her work on CNN and her current work for PBS and National Public Radio.

The award was created in honor of long-time NBC News anchor John Chancellor.

Hinojosa was chosen “in recognition of the courage and independence she has shown over the course of her career reporting on those whose stories might not otherwise make it into the mainstream media,” the journalism school said.

Born in Mexico City and raised in Chicago, Hinojosa hosts the programs Latino USA on NPR and Need to Know on PBS.

Among the subjects Hinojosa has covered are immigrants’ jobs in New Orleans after the passage of Hurricane Katrina; rape in the U.S. Armed Forces; the lives of poor people and youth violence in immigrant communities.

The prize, which comes with a cash stipend of $25,000, will be presented at a November 14 ceremony at Columbia‘s Low Library in New York.