Yandel Releases Sequel to His Debut Solo Album, “Quien Contra Mi 2”

Yandel is back with more contra music…

Seventeen years after releasing his solo debut album Quien Contra Mi, the 43-year-old Puerto Rican reggaeton singer-songwriter has released a sequel that features 22 tracks.

Yandel

Written and produced between his home and studio in Orlando while in quarantime during the COVID-19 pandemic, Quien Contra Mi 2 features 28 different collaborations, including music with J Balvin, Snoop Dogg and Ruben Blades, Anuel AA, El Alfa, Manuel Turizo, Nicky Jam and Rauw Alejandro.

In the nearly four-minute intro, Yandel shares a motivational speech to the new generation of artists.

“I wanted to tell my story, to pump up the kids who are just starting. And, since people always say I’m so quiet, well, here’s something different,” he says, elaborating on his struggles and accomplishments.

Quien Contra Mí was released in September 2003.

Carlos Vives Releases Indigenous Roots-Inspired Album “Cumbiana”

Carlos Vives is going back to his roots…

The 58-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter has released his latest album, Cumbiana, a search for the indigenous roots of Colombian music. 

Carlos Vives

The album has been described as “exuberant, soulful, beautiful and important without ever sounding overbearing,” by Billboard.

The album features duets with Jessie ReyezRuben Blades and Alejandro Sanz,and ittreads that line between what’s commercial and what’s artistic.

“I discovered a lost world. That’s the truth,” Vives simply states, speaking from his home in Bogota, where he’s been in lockdown for the past two months.

“We’ve always spoken about our African heritage in music,” he adds. “We’ve always thought that the most uplifting elements of our music came from Africa or from European rhythms like polka. But it turns out it comes from Andean, or indigenous music. This album highlights the joy of the fusion of African, European and indigenous music.”

Marrying Colombia’s past with the future, Cumbianahas already delivered a chart hit with “No Te Vayas.” Edgier still is current single “For Sale,” a mix of traditional beats with reggaeton, a touch of rap and Sanz’s flamenco strains. Of course, Vives wrote the rulebook for Colombian fusion.

His 1994 album, La Tierra Del Olvido, where he marries Colombia’s most traditional folk beats — vallenato, cumbiaporro— with rock guitars and drums and pop sensibility, is the original blueprint of the sound that would later define the work of acts like JuanesFonseca and even Shakira at times.

But Cumbiana expands its realm. So much so that this is the first of a three-album project.

Rubén Blades to Take Part in the Hollywood Bowl’s 2020 ‘Jazz Plus’ Concert Series

Rubén Blades is jazz’edfor a special performance…

The 71-year-old Panamanian singer/songwriter will grace the stage during the Hollywood Bowl’s 2020 Jazz Plus concert series.

Ruben Blades

Blades, a nine-time Grammy winner, will perform with Chick Corea and the Spanish Heart Band and Cuba’s Los Van Van on Wednesday, July 29.

The concert is part of the LA Phil’s Pan-American Music Initiative.

Other acts set to take part in the concert series include Debbie HarryCharlie WilsonHiatus Kaiyote and Sheryl Crow.

The lineup is curated by the LA Phil’s creative chair for jazz Herbie Hancock—who will also headline one of the shows—the series will begin on July 29 and run through September 23.

Here’s the schedule:

July 29 — Chick Corea and the Spanish Heart Band featuring Rubén Blades; Los Van Van. This concert is part of the LA Phil’s Pan-American Music Initiative.
Aug. 5 — Miss Peggy Lee at 100. The Grammy-winning singer/songwriter will be saluted by the legendary Count Basie Orchestra and special guest Debbie Harry.
Aug. 12 — Charlie Wilson
Aug. 19 — John Fogerty; Robert Randolph and the Family Band. Fogerty’s 50-Year Trip Show will include Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 1969 Woodstock set list as well as other fan favorites.
Aug. 26 — Dave Brubeck and Charlie Parker centennial celebrations. The Brubeck tribute will feature the Brubeck Brothers Quartet, David Benoit, Joey DeFrancecso, Bobby Millitello and Lizz Wright. Parker’s will be helmed by John Beasley + Magnus Lindgren featuring MONK’estra with Strings and special guests Tia Fuller, Donald Harrison, Charles McPherson and Chris Potter.
Sept. 9 — Hiatus Kaiyote; additional guest to be announced
Sept. 16 — Sheryl Crow; Lake Street Dive
Sept. 23 — Herbie Hancock; Jamie Cullum

Rosalia Makes History with Grammy Nomination for Best New Artist

It’s a brand new (artist)day for Rosalia

The 26-year-old Spanish singer/songwriter has earned the first two Grammy nominations of her career, including a historic nod for Best New Artist.

Rosalia

Rosalia, a five-time Latin Grammy winner, is the first all-Spanish language singer to be nominated in the best new artist category. Other Latino artists have been nominated in the category over the years, including Vikki Carr in 1963, and Mariah CareyChristina Aguilera and Esperanza Spalding have won the award. Even José Feliciano won best new artist in 1969, bolstered by his hit version of the Doors’ “Light My Fire.” But the previous nominees and winners were not, however, honored for their work recorded exclusively in Spanish.

Rosalia’s second nomination comes in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for her second studio album, El Mal Querer. The album took home all the Latin Grammy awards it was nominated for, including Album of the Year, one of the top awards of the night.

Bad Bunny picked up two nominations… in the same category.

The 25-year-old Puerto Rican Latin trap and reggaeton singer-rapper is nominated in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for his Latin Grammy-winning debut album X 100PRE, as well as his collaborative album with J Balvin, Oasis.

Esperanza Spalding, a four-time Grammy winner, including Best New Artist, has picked up two nods this year. 

The 35-year-old part-Latinajazz bassist and singer is nominated in the Best Jazz Vocal Album category for her album12 Little Spells. She’s also up for Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals for serving as the arranger on her own single track “12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine).”

Vince Mendoza is back in familiar territory…

The 58-year-old Latino music arranger, conductorand composer, a multi-Grammy winner, has picked up four nominations. 

He’s nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for his work on Trisha Yearwood’s “Over The Rainbow.” 

Mendoza picked up two nods in the Best Instrumental Composition category for conducting Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band’s “Begin Again,” as well as composing “Love, A Beautiful Force,” his single with Terell StaffordDick Oatts and the Temple University Studio Orchestra.

Emilio Solla is in the running for a Grammy this year…

The Argentine pianist and composer is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella category for arranging “La Novena,” his single with the Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra.

Diego Figueiredo picked up a nod

The 39-year-old Brazilian musician is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for arrangement alongside Cyrille Aiméeon Aimée’s “Marry Me A Little.”

Camila Cabello, a two-time Grammy nominee last year, has earned a nod this year…

The 22-year-old Mexican and Cuban singer and former Fifth Harmony member is nominated in the Best Pop Duo/Group Performance category for her collaboration with Shawn Mendes, “Señorita.” 

Cardi B has earned a nod this year…

The 27-year-old half-Dominican American rap superstar, who picked up her first Grammy at this year’s awards show for her debut album Invasion of Privacy, is up for Best Rap Performance for her work opposite Offset on “Clout.”

Rodrigo y Gabrielahave reason to celebrate…

The Mexican acoustic guitar duo, comprised of Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero, picked up its first Grammy nomination. Rodrigo y Gabriela is nominated in the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album category for Mettavolution.

Jessie Reyez is a first-time Grammynominee…

The 28-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is nominated in the Best Urban Contemporary Album category for her sophomore album Being Human In Public. The album picked up a Juno Award in her home country of Canada for RnB/Soul Recording of the Year.

Sebastian Plano is celebrating his Grammy nod…

The Argentine composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist is nominated in the Best New Age Album category for his albumVerve.

Melissa Aldana has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 30-year-old Chilean tenor saxophone player is nominated in the Best Improvised Jazz Solo category for “Elsewhere.”

The nominees in the Best Latin Jazz Album include Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band (Antidote), Thalma De Freitas with Vitor GonçalvesJohn PatitucciChico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato Duduka Da Fonse (Sorte!: Music By John Finbury), Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Rubén Blades (Una Noche Con Rubén Blades), David Sánchez (Carib), and Miguel Zenón (Sonero: The Music of Ismael Rivera)

The Best Latin Pop Album nominees include an eclectic mix of artists: Luis Fonsi (Vida), Maluma (11:11), Ricardo Montaner (Montaner), Alejandro Sanz (#ELDISCO), and Sebastian Yatra (Fantasía).

In addition to Bad Bunny, J Balvin and Rosalia, the nominees in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category include Flor De Toloache (Indestructible) and iLe(Almadura).

The Best Regional Mexican Music Album (including Tejano) include Joss Favela (Caminando), Intocable (Percepción), La Energia Norteña (Poco A Poco), Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea (20 Aniversario), and Mariachi Los Camperos (De Ayer Para Siempre).

The Best Tropical Latin Album nominees include Marc Anthony (Opus), Luis Enrique + C4Trio (Tiempo Al Tiempo), Vicente Garcia (Candela), Juan Luis Guerra 4.40 (Literal) and Aymée Nuviola (A Journey Through Cuban Music).

The Best Musical Theater Album nominees includeHadestown, with Eva Noblezada as one of the principal soloists, and Moulin Rouge! The Musical, with Karen Olivo as one of the principal soloists. It’s the first Grammy nod for both Noblezada, who is half-Mexican American, and Olivo, who is part Puerto Rican and Dominican American.

Gustavo Dudamelis back in the hunt for a Grammy

The 38-year-oldVenezuelan-Spanish conductor and violinist, who won his first Grammy in 2011, is nominated in the Best Orchestral Performance category for conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonnic’s Norman: Sustain.”

FKA Twigs has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 31-year-old part-Spanish singer is up for Best Music Video for her acclaimed music video for “Cellophane.”

Lizzo led the pack with eight nods, while Billie Eillish and Lil Nas Xfollowed close behind with six nominations each. All three musicians are first-time Grammy nominees.

Alicia Keyswill return as host the ceremony for the second year in a row, making her the third womanand the first female musician to host the show twice.

The Grammy Awardswill take place on January 26 at the Staples Centerin Los Angeles. The broadcast will air live on CBSat 5:00 pm PT/ 8:00 pm ET.

Here’s a look at the categories with Latino nominees:

GENERAL FIELD

Best New Artist
Black Pumas
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Maggie Rogers
Rosalía
Tank and the Bangas
Yola

POP FIELD

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:
“Boyfriend” — Ariana Grande & Social House
“Sucker” — Jonas Brothers
“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus
“Señorita” — Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album:
Ancestral Recall — Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
Star People Nation — Theo Croker
Beat Music! Beat Music! Beat Music! — Mark Guiliana
Elevate — Lettuce
Mettavolution — Rodrigo y Gabriela

R&B

Best Urban Contemporary Album:
Apollo XXI — Steve Lacy
Cuz I Love You (Deluxe) — Lizzo
Overload — Georgia Anne Muldrow
Saturn — Nao
Being Human In Public — Jessie Reyez

RAP

Best Rap Performance:
“Middle Child” — J.Cole
“Suge” — DaBaby
“Down Bad” — Dreamville ft. J.I.D, Bas, J. Cole, Earthgang & Young Nudy
“Racks In The Middle” — Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy
“Clout” — Offset ft. Cardi B

NEW AGE

Best New Age Album:
Fairy Dreams — David Arkenstone
Homage To Kindness — David Darling
Wings — Peter Kater
Verve — Sebastian Plano
Deva — Deva Premal

JAZZ

Best Improvised Jazz Solo:
“Elsewhere” — Melissa Aldana, soloist
“Sozinho” — Randy Brecker, soloist
“Tomorrow Is The Question” — Julian Lage, soloist
“The Windup” — Brandford Marsalis, soloist
“Sightseeing” — Christian McBride, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album:
Thirsty Ghost — Sara Gazarek
Love & Liberation — Jazzmeia Horn
Alone Together — Catherine Russell
12 Little Spells — Esperanza Spalding
Screenplay — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Latin Jazz Album:
Antidote — Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band
Sorte!: Music By John Finbury — Thalma De Freitas With Vitor Gonçalves, John Patitucci, Chico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato & Duduka Da Fonseca
Una Noche Con Rubén Blades — Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis & Rubén Blades
Carib — David Sánchez
Sonero: The Music Of Ismael Rivera — Miguel Zenón

LATIN

Best Latin Pop Album:
Vida — Luis Fonsi
11:11 — Maluma
Montaner — Ricardo Montaner
#ELDISCO — Alejandro Sanz
Fantasía — Sebastian Yatra

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:
X 100PRE — Bad Bunny
Oasis — J Balvin & Bad Bunny
Indestructible — Flor De Toloache
Almadura — iLe
El Mal Querer – Rosalía

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano):
Caminando — Joss Favela
Percepción — Intocable
Poco A Poco — La Energia Norteña
20 Aniversario — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea
De Ayer Para Siempre — Mariachi Los Camperos

Best Tropical Latin Album:
Opus — Marc Anthony
Tiempo Al Tiempo — Luis Enrique + C4 Trio
Candela — Vicente García
Literal — Juan Luis Guerra 4.40
A Journey Through Cuban Music — Aymée Nuviola

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

Best American Roots Performance:
“Saint Honesty” — Sara Bareilles
“Father Mountain” — Calexico With Iron & Wine
“I’m On My Way” — Rhiannon Giddens With Francesco Turrisi
“Call My Name” — I’m With Her
“Faraway Look” — Yola

MUSICAL THEATER

Best Musical Theater Album:
Ain’t Too Proud: The Life And Times Of The Temptations — Saint Aubyn, Derrick Baskin, James Harkness, Jawan M. Jackson, Jeremy Pope & Ephraim Sykes, principal soloists; Scott M. Riesett, producer (Original Broadway Cast)
Hadestown — Reeve Carney, André De Shields, Amber Gray, Eva Noblezada & Patrick Page, principal soloists; Mara Isaacs, David Lai, Anaïs Mitchell & Todd Sickafoose, producers (Anaïs Mitchell, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)
Moulin Rouge! The Musical — Danny Burstein, Tam Mutu, Sahr Ngaujah, Karen Olivo & Aaron Tveit, principal soloists; Justin Levine, Baz Luhrmann, Matt Stine & Alex Timbers, producers (Original Broadway Cast)
The Music Of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child – In Four Contemporary Suites — Imogen Heap, producer; Imogen Heap, composer (Imogen Heap)
Oklahoma! — Damon Daunno, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Ali Stroker, Mary Testa & Patrick Vaill, principal soloists; Daniel Kluger & Dean Sharenow, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2019 Broadway Cast)

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:
The Lion King: The Songs — (Various Artists)
Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood — (Various Artists)
Rocketman — Taron Egerton
Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse — (Various Artists)
A Star Is Born — Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper

COMPOSING/ARRANGING

Best Instrumental Composition:
“Begin Again” — Fred Hersch, composer (Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band Conducted By Vince Mendoza)
“Crucible For Crisis” — Brian Lynch, composer (Brian Lynch Big Band)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite” — John Williams, composer (John Williams)
“Walkin’ Funny” — Christian McBride, composer (Christian McBride)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella:
“Blue Skies” — Kris Bowers, arranger (Kris Bowers)
“Hedwig’s Theme” — John Williams, arranger (Anne-Sophie Mutter & John Williams)
“La Novena” — Emilio Solla, arranger (Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Moon River” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:
“All Night Long” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier Featuring Jules Buckley, Take 6 & Metropole Orkest)
“Jolene” — Geoff Keezer, arranger (Sara Gazarek)
“Marry Me A Little” — Cyrille Aimée & Diego Figueiredo, arrangers (Cyrille Aimée)
“Over The Rainbow” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Trisha Yearwood)
“12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine)” — Esperanza Spalding, arranger (Esperanza Spalding)

PACKAGE

Best Recording Package:
Anónimas & Resilientes — Luisa María Arango, Carlos Dussan, Manuel García-Orozco & Juliana Jaramillo-Buenaventura, art directors (Voces Del Bullerengue)
Chris Cornell — Barry Ament, Jeff Ament, Jeff Fura & Joe Spix, art directors (Chris Cornell)
Hold That Tiger — Andrew Wong & Fongming Yang, art directors (The Muddy Basin Ramblers)
i,i — Aaron Anderson & Eric Timothy Carlson, art directors (Bon Iver)
Intellexual — Irwan Awalludin, art director (Intellexual)

NOTES

Best Album Notes:
The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions — Judy Cantor-Navas, album notes writer (Various Artists)
The Gospel According To Malaco — Robert Marovich, album notes writer (Various Artists)
Pedal Steel + Four Corners — Brendan Greaves, album notes writer (Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band)
Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection — Jeff Place, album notes writer (Pete Seeger)
Stax ’68: A Memphis Story — Steve Greenberg, album notes writer (Various Artists)

CLASSICAL

Best Orchestral Performance:
“Bruckner: Symphony No. 9” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)
“Copland: Billy The Kid; Grohg” — Leonard Slatkin, conductor (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
“Norman: Sustain” — Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)
“Transatlantic” — Louis Langrée, conductor (Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra)
“Weinberg: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21” — Mirga Gražinytė-tyla, conductor (City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra & Kremerata Baltica)

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

Best Music Video:
“We’ve Got To Try” — The Chemical Brothers, Ellie Fry, video director; Ninian Doff, video producer
“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Savanah Leaf, video director; Alicia Martinez, video producer
“Cellophane” — FKA twigs, Andrew Thomas Huang, video director; Alex Chamberlain, video producer
“Old Town Road (Official Movie)” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus, Calmatic, video director; Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, video producers
“Glad He’s Gone” — Tove Lo,  Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Natan Schottenfels, video producer

Bruno Mars Wins Six Grammys, Including Album, Record & Song of the Year

It’s a (24K) magical time for Bruno Mars

The 32-year-old part-Puerto Rican singer-songwriter was the big winner at Sunday night’s Grammy Awards, picking up six gramophones.

Bruno Mars

It was a clean sweep for Mars, who’d previously won five Grammys since 2011, including wins in the three major categories.

Mars took home his first Album of the Year award for his own work, his hit album 24K Magic, thereby denying rappers Kendrick Lamar and Jay-Z the honor of becoming the first hip-hop artist in 14 years to win the coveted album of the year.

Additionally, he took home the award for song of the year for his hit single “That’s What I Like,” and record of the year for “24K Magic.”

“Don’t cut me off Grammys, please,” said Mars from the stage while accepting the last award of the night. Recounting his early days as a young performer entertaining tourists in his native Hawaii, Mars name-checked writer-producers Babyface, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and Teddy Riley as key influences.

Shakira picked up the third Grammy of her career…

The 40-year-old Colombian superstar took home the award for Best Latin Pop Album for his critically acclaimed album El Dorado.

Residente picked up the first Grammy of his career as a solo artist.

The 39-year-old Puerto Rican rapper, who’d previously won two Grammys and a slew of Latin Grammys as a member of Calle 13, took home the award for Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album for his self-titled album.

Lin-Manuel Miranda picked up his third Grammy.

The 38-year-old composer, lyricist, playwright, and actor won the award for Best Song Written for Visual Media for his single from Disney’s Moana soundtrack, “How Far I’ll Go.”

Other Latino winners include Aida Cuevas for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) and Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta for Best Tropical Latin Album.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Album of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Record of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Song of the Year: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best New Artist: Alessia Cara

Best Pop Solo Performance: “Shape of You” — Ed Sheeran

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: “Feel It Still” — Portugal. The Man

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” — Various Artists; Dae Bennett, producer

Best Pop Vocal Album: “÷” — Ed Sheeran

Best Dance Recording: “Tonite” — LCD Soundsystem

Best Dance/Electronic Album: “3-D The Catalogue” — Kraftwerk

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Prototype” — Jeff Lorber Fusion

Best Rock Performance: “You Want It Darker” — Leonard Cohen

Best Metal Performance: “Sultan’s Curse” — Mastodon

Best Rock Song: “Run” — Foo Fighters, songwriters

Best Rock Album: “A Deeper Understanding” — The War on Drugs

Best Alternative Music Album: “Sleep Well Beast” — The National

Best R&B Performance: “That’s What I Like” — Bruno Mars

Best Traditional R&B Performance: “Redbone” — Childish Gambino

Best R&B Song: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best Urban Contemporary Album: “Starboy” — The Weeknd

Best R&B Album: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Best Rap Performance: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Rap/Sung Performance: “LOYALTY.” — Kendrick Lamar featuring Rihanna

Best Rap Song: “HUMBLE.” — K. Duckworth, Asheton Hogan and M. Williams II, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

Best Rap Album: “DAMN.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Country Solo Performance: “Either Way” — Chris Stapleton

Best Country Duo/Group Performance: “Better Man” — Little Big Town

Best Country Song: “Broken Halos” — Mike Henderson and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

Best Country Album: “From a Room: Volume 1” — Chris Stapleton

Best New Age Album: “Dancing on Water” — Peter Kater

Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Miles Beyond” — John McLaughlin, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album: “Dreams and Daggers” — Cécile McLorin Salvant

Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Rebirth” — Billy Childs

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Bringin’ It” — Christian McBride Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album: “Jazz Tango” — Pablo Ziegler Trio

Best Gospel Performance/Song: “Never Have to Be Alone” — CeCe Winans; Dwan Hill & Alvin Love III, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song: “What a Beautiful Name” — Hillsong Worship; Ben Fielding & Brooke Ligertwood, songwriters

Best Gospel Album: “Let Them Fall in Love” — CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: “Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams

Best Roots Gospel Album: “Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope” — Reba McEntire

Best Latin Pop Album: “El Dorado” — Shakira

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album: “Residente” — Residente

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano): “Arriero Somos Versiones Acústicas” — Aida Cuevas

Best Tropical Latin Album: “Salsa Big Band” — Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance: “Killer Diller Blues” — Alabama Shakes

Best American Roots Song: “If We Were Vampires” — Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit)

Best Americana Album: “The Nashville Sound” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Best Bluegrass Album: tie, “Laws of Gravity” — The Infamous Stringdusters and “All the Rage — In Concert Volume One” — Rhonda Vincent and the Rage

Best Traditional Blues Album: “Blue & Lonesome” — The Rolling Stones

Best Contemporary Blues Album: “TajMo” — Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’

Best Folk Album: “Mental Illness” — Aimee Mann

Best Regional Roots Music Album: “Kalenda” — Lost Bayou Ramblers

Best Reggae Album: “Stony Hill” — Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

Best World Music Album: “Shaka Zulu Revisited: 30th Anniversary Celebration” — Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Best Children’s Album: “Feel What U Feel” — Lisa Loeb

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling): “The Princess Diarist” — Carrie Fisher

Best Comedy Album: “The Age of Spin/Deep in the Heart of Texas” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album: “Dear Evan Hansen” — Ben Platt, principal soloist; Alex Lacamoire, Stacey Mindich, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, producers; Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, composers/lyricists (original Broadway cast recording)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Various Artists

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Justin Hurwitz, composer

Best Song Written for Visual Media: “How Far I’ll Go” — Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Auli’i Cravalho)

Best Instrumental Composition: “Three Revolutions” — Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: “Escapades for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra From ‘Catch Me If You Can’” — John Williams, arranger (John Williams)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals: “Putin” — Randy Newman, arranger (Randy Newman)

Best Recording Package: tie, “Pure Comedy (Deluxe Edition)” — Sasha Barr, Ed Steed and Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) and “El Orisha de la Rosa” — Claudio Roncoli and Cactus Taller, art directors (Magín Díaz)

Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package: “The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition” — Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly and David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Album Notes: “Live at the Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings” — Lynell George, writer (Otis Redding)

Best Historical Album: “Leonard Bernstein — The Composer” — Robert Russ, compilation producer; Martin Kistner and Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Leonard Bernstein)

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “24K Magic” — Serban Ghenea, John Hanes and Charles Moniz, engineers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer (Bruno Mars)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Greg Kurstin

Best Remixed Recording: “You Move (Latroit Remix)” — Dennis White, remixer (Depeche Mode)

Best Surround Sound Album: “Early Americans” — Jim Anderson, surround mix engineer; Darcy Proper, surround mastering engineer; Jim Anderson and Jane Ira Bloom, surround producers (Jane Ira Bloom)

Best Engineered Album, Classical: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Mark Donahue, engineer (Manfred Honeck and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Producer of the Year, Classical: David Frost

Best Orchestral Performance: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording: “Berg: Wozzeck” — Hans Graf, conductor; Anne Schwanewilms and Roman Trekel; Hans Graf and Brad Sayles, producers (Houston Symphony; Chorus of Students and Alumni, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University and Houston Grand Opera Children’s Chorus)

Best Choral Performance: “Bryars: The Fifth Century” — Donald Nally, conductor (PRISM Quartet and The Crossing)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance: “Death & the Maiden” — Patricia Kopatchinskaja and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Best Classical Instrumental Solo: “Transcendental” — Daniil Trifonov

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album: “Crazy Girl Crazy” — Barbara Hannigan (Ludwig Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium: “Higdon: All Things Majestic, Viola Concerto & Oboe Concerto” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition: “Viola Concerto” — Jennifer Higdon, composer (Roberto Díaz, Giancarlo Guerrero and Nashville Symphony)

Best Music Video: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Music Film: “The Defiant Ones” — Various Artists

Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee Win Four Latin Grammys for “Despacito”

Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee proved to be the night’s brightest stars at this year’s Latin Grammy Awards.

The 39-year-old Puerto Rican singer and the 40-year-old reggaeton star, the artists behind this year’s global smash single “Despacito,” picked up four awards from the Latin Recording Academy, including two of the biggest prizes.

Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee

Fonsi and Daddy Yankee won Record of the Year and Song of the Year for “Despacito,” while their remix of the song featuring Justin Bieber was named Best Urban Fusion/Performance.

Not far behind, Vicente Garcia.

The 34-year-old Dominican singer, songwriter and composer picked up three awards, including Best New Artist. He also received the Best Tropical Song prize for his single “Bachata en Kingston,” as well as Best Singer-Songwriter Album for A La Mar.

Latin music veteran Ruben Blades, who won two awards, took home the night’s biggest honor Album of the Year for his album, Salsa Big Band, with Roberto Delgado & Orquesta.

It’s the second Album of the Year trophy for the 69-year-old Panamanian singer-songwriter. He previously took home the award in 2014 for his album Tangos.

Natalia Lafourcade, a Latin Grammy darling, added two more awards to her collection.

The 33-year-old Mexican singer-songwriter won the Best Folk Album award for her album Musas, which was produced in collaboration with the acoustic guitar duo Los Macorinos. The album is a homage to Latin American folk music, coand contains original songs as well as cover versions of other artists’ songs.

Shakira, who is currently on vocal rest and absent from the ceremony, won Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album for her latest record, El Dorado.

The 2017 Latin Grammy Awards were held at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Thursday night. The three-hour show, hosted by Roselyn Sanchez and Jaime Camil, included performances by Fonsi, Steve Aoki, Alessia Cara, J Balvin, Maluma and Person of the Year Alejandro Sanz, among others.

Lin-Manuel Miranda was also honored with the President’s Merit Award for his outstanding and numerous contributions to the Latin community, including his relief efforts for Puerto Rico following the devastation of Hurricane Maria. Upon taking the stage, the Hamilton creator thanked his team and his wife, Vanessa Nadal.

“My people! Thank you, it’s an honor to be here,” Miranda began his Spanglish speech. “No one gets here alone,” he added before expressing how proud he was of the Latino community and dedicating the award to Puerto Rico.

“I know I’m a weird theater kid here, with a weird accent,” he continued. “But let’s keep collaborating and show the world that Latinos can change the world when we collaborate.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Album of the Year: Salsa Big Band — Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado & Orquesta
Record of the Year: “Despacito” — Luis Fonsi featuring Daddy Yankee
Song of the Year (A Songwriter’s Award): “Despacito” — Daddy Yankee, Erika Ender and Luis Fonsi, songwriters (Luis Fonsi featuring Daddy Yankee)
Best New Artist: Vicente García
Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album: El Dorado, Shakira
Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Salón, Lágrimas Y Deseo, Lila Downs
Best Urban Fusion/Performance: Despacito (Remix) Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee featuring Justin Bieber
Best Urban Music Album: Residente, Residente
Best Urban Song: Somos Anormales, Rafael Arcaute, Igor Koshkendey & Residente, Songwriters (Residente)
Best Rock Album: La Gran Oscilación, Diamante Eléctrico
Best Pop/Rock Album: Mis Planes Son Amarte, Juanes
Best Rock Song: Déjala Rodar, Juan Galeano, Songwriter (Diamante Eléctrico) & La Noche, Andrés Calamaro, Songwriter (Andrés Calamaro) [Tie]
Best Alternative Music Album: Jei Beibi, Café Tacvba
Best Alternative Song: Amárrame, Mon Laferte, Songwriter (Mon Laferte featuring Juanes)
Best Salsa Album: Salsa Big Band, Rubén Blades Con Roberto Delgado & Orquesta
Best Cumbia/Vallenato Album:
Ni Un Paso Atrás, Jorge Celedón y Sergio Luis Rodríguez
Best Contemporary Tropical Album: Bidimensional,
Guaco
Best Traditional Tropical Album:
To Beny Moré With Love, Jon Secada Featuring The Charlie Sepúlveda Big Band
Best Tropical Fusion Album:
Olga Tañón Y Punto., Olga Tañón
Best Tropical Song:
Bachata En Kingston, Vicente García, Songwriter (Vicente García)
Best Singer-Songwriter Album:
A La Mar, Vicente García
Best Ranchero/Mariachi Album:
Las Caras Lindas, Flor De Toloache
Best Banda Album:
Ayer Y Hoy, Banda El Recodo De Cruz Lizárraga
Best Norteño Album:
Piénsalo, Los Palominos
Best Regional Song:
Siempre Es Así, Juan Treviño, Songwriter (Juan Treviño Featuring Aj Castillo)
Best Instrumental Album: Spain Forever, Michel Camilo & Tomatito
Best Folk Album: Musas (Un Homenaje Al Folclore Latinoamericano En Manos De Los Macorinos, Vol. 1), Natalia Lafourcade
Best Tango Album: Solo Buenos Aires, Fernando Otero
Best Flamenco Album: Memoria De Los Sentidos, Vicente Amigo
Best Latin Jazz/Jazz Album: Dance Of Time, Eliane Elias
Best Christian Album (Spanish Language): Momentos, Alex Campos
Best Portuguese Language Christian Album: Acenda A Sua Luz, Aline Barros
Best Portuguese Language Contemporary Pop Album: Troco Likes Ao Vivo: Um Filme De Tiago Iorc, Tiago Iorc
Best Portuguese Language Rock Or Alternative Album: Jardim – Pomar, Nando Reis
Best Samba/Pagode Album: + Misturado, Mart’nália
Best Mpb (Musica Popular Brasileira) Album: Dos Navegantes, Edu Lobo, Romero Lubambo, Mauro Senise
Best Sertaneja Music Album: Daniel, Daniel
Best Brazilian Roots Album: Ao Vivo – Melodias Do Sertão, Bruna Viola
Best Portuguese Language Song: Trevo (Tu), Ana Caetano & Tiago Iorc, Songwriters (Anavitória Featuring Tiago Iorc)
Best Latin Children’s Album: Marc Anthony For Babies, Varios artistas
Best Classical Album: Música De Compositores Costarricenses Vol. 2, Eddie Mora, Directing The Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional De Costa Rica; Winnie Camila Berg, Solista; Carlos Chaves, Album Producer
Best Classical Contemporary Composition: Sonata Del Decamerón Negro, Leo Brouwer, Composer (Mabel Millán)
Best Recording Package: El Orisha De La Rosa, Carlos Dussán, Juliana Jaramillo, Juan Felipe Martínez & Claudio Roncoli, Art Directors (Magín Díaz)
Best Engineered Album: Mis Planes Son Amarte, Josh Gudwin, Mixer; Tom Coyne, Mastering Engineer (Juanes)
Producer Of The Year: Eduardo Cabra [A La Mar (Vicente García) (A), La Fortuna (Diana Fuentes Featuring Tommy Torres) (S), La Lucha (La Vida Bohème) (A), Sofá (Silvina Moreno) (A), Somos (Swing Original Monks) (A)]
Best Short Form Music Video: Despacito, Luis Fonsi Featuring Daddy Yankee, Carlos R. Perez, Video Director; Joanna Egozcue & Roxy Quiñones, Video Producers
Best Long Form Music Video: Musas, El Documental, Natalia Lafourcade, Bruno Bancalari, Video Director; Juan Pablo López Fonseca, Video Producer

Lin-Manuel Miranda Organizing All-Star Charity Disaster Relief Single for Puerto Rico

Lin-Manuel Miranda is making music for a cause close to his heart…

The 37-year-old composer, lyricist, playwright, and actor, best known for creating and starring in the Tony Award-winning Broadway musicals Hamilton and In the Heights, has organized what could be an all-star charity single to raise money for disaster relief in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Miranda hasn’t revealed the song’s title yet, but it will be available on October 6, according to CNN.

Miranda, whose parents came to the United States from Puerto Rico, said he “called every Puerto Rican I know” to contribute to the song. Two of the people participating are singer Ruben Blades and Hamilton castmate Anthony Ramos, who each belt out “Puerto Rico” in brief previews Miranda posted to Twitter.

“I had the idea at 3 in the morning. … The initial demo was me singing in a bathroom,” Miranda told CNN. “To every artist, I’ve said, ‘Can you help out on this song?’ And they said yes. Without even hearing the song, everyone’s joined in.”

“Puerto Ricans, that’s 3.5 million American citizens, just like Texas, just like Florida. I know there’s a tendency for fatigue because we’ve just been through two hurricanes. And we can’t be fatigued when it comes to our fellow Americans,” Miranda told CNN of the crisis in Puerto Rico, where many people are still without power and running short on basic supplies.

Miranda said his family in Puerto Rico is “all right,” but “there were a few terrifying days where nobody heard from anyone.”

Santa Rosa Becomes Guinness World Records Record-Holder

Gilberto Santa Rosa has entered the record books…

The 54-year-old Puerto Rican singer, known as El Caballero de la Salsa, has become a Guinness World Records record-holder.

Gilberto Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa has been recognized for having the most No. 1s on Billboard’s Tropical Albums chart.

He’s earned 12 No. 1s since the chart launched in 1985, more than any other act (Victor Manuelle follows with 11).

Guinness World Records presented him with the award at La Salsa Vive, The Concert at Madison Square Garden, where Santa Rosa and other tropical artists, like El Gran Combo, Ruben Blades and Jose Alberto El Canario” all performed.

Santa Rosa, who began his singing career during the 1980s, earned his first No. 1 in 1992 with Perspectiva — which, with 10 crowning weeks, is his longest-running chart-topper to date. Most recently, Necesito Un Bolero topped the tally on the Feb. 28, 2015 dated list.

Here’s a look at Santa Rosa’s 12 No. 1s on the Tropical Albums chart:

Title, Peak date (weeks at No. 1)

Perspectiva
, Jan. 11, 1992 (10 weeks)
Esencia, Dec. 7, 1996 (four weeks)
Intenso, May 19, 2001 (two weeks)
Viceversa, Sept. 21, 2002 (eight weeks)
Autentico, Sept. 11, 2004 (one week)
Asi Es Nuestra Navidad (with El Gran Combo), Dec. 17, 2005 (two weeks)
Dos Soneros, Una Historia (with Victor Manulle), Dec. 31, 2005 (three weeks)
Directo Al Corazon, April 1, 2006 (two weeks)
Una Navidad Con Gilberto, Dec. 20, 2008 (three weeks)
El Caballero De La Salsa: La Historia Tropical, May 30, 2009 (one week)
Irrepetible, July 17, 2010 (one week)
Necesito Un Bolero, Feb. 28, 2015 (one week)

Guinness World Records adjudicator Raquel Assis bestowed the award to Santa Rosa at the concert. She stated “as the global authority in record-breaking, it is an honor to present Gilberto with this achievement and to be part of a night filled with some of the biggest stars of tropical music.”

In addition to his album achievements, Santa Rosa has also notched several hit songs on the Billboard charts. He holds 10 top 10s on the Hot Latin Songs chart, including a No. 1 with “Que Alguien Me Diga,” which spent three weeks atop the chart in 2000. Over on the Tropical Songs chart, he has notched 14 No. 1s, where he is tied (with Elvis Crespo) for third place among acts with the most chart-toppers.

Nieves Starring in the Latino-Themed Off-Broadway Musical “I Like It Like That”

Tito Nieves likes it like that…

The 58-year-old Puerto Rican salsa singer is starring in the new off-Broadway musical I Like It Like That.

Tito Nieves

“We didn’t have politicians or other idols to look up to [in those days],” explains David Maldonado, producer and co-writer of the new musical. “There were not many Latino athletes around. The idols became Eddie Palmieri and Hector Lavoe…. Music artists were the most important figures. Music became like the religion of the masses.”

The show, now playing at the Puerto Rican Traveling Theater in New York, includes songs from the repertoire of Palmieri and Lavoe, Ruben Blades, Willie Colon, Joe Cuba, Tito Puente, El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, La Lupe and more.

I Like It Like That takes its title from the song that was a Billboard chart hit for Pete Rodriguez in 1967. Thirty years later, the bugalú cornerstone was revived in a hit cover by Nieves, who stars as family patriarch Roberto Rodriguez in the new musical.

Featuring a seven-piece band, the theater production is a “historical musical journey” that Maldonado describes as a social chronicle of New York in the ’70s, as well as a sing-and-dance-along showcase for the great music of the period that came out of the city’s Latino neighborhoods. The play chronicles life in the barrio in those decadent days in New York.

“We were going bankrupt,” says Maldonado, who grew up in Brooklyn. “Garbage all over the place, potholes, civil unrest…”

Maldonado describes I Like It Like That as being “about social conscience. Some people want to escape, and others want to fight for the hood, which most people called ‘the ghetto.’”

He notes that in addition to the music, the language used in the play accurately reflects the period.

“It is in Spanglish,” he says. “Mostly English. I wasn’t doing that because I was trying to get a wider audience, although I do appreciate that. It was because at that time, there was salsa, but everyone was speaking English. The music was in Spanish, but if you look at those albums, the liner notes were in English.”

Maldonado and co-writer Waddys Jáquez (who also directs the play) tell the story of the Rodriguez family in East Harlem, using salsa, bugalú and bolero classics to advance the story.

Characters were created from those described in songs like Blades’ “Paula C,” and song lyrics were used to set the action and inspire the dialog, says Maldonado. The musical also includes original songs.

I Like It Like That promises to appeal to fans of the Celia Cruz musical Celia, and Quien Mató a Hector Lavoe; both shows also produced by Maldonado, which combined social chronicle with musical tribute.

New Trailer Released for Ramirez’s Roberto Duran Biopic “Hands of Stone”

Edgar Ramirez’s gloves are on…

The Weinstein Company has released its latest trailer for Hands of Stone, the Roberto Duran boxing biopic starring the 39-year-old Venezuelan actor and Robert De Niro.

 

Hands of Stone

Duran became a hero in his native Panama as he rose through the ranks behind trainer Ray Arcel (De Niro), winning titles in four different weight classes. But it was his three epic bouts with Leonard that mattered most, the first when Duran beat Leonard to steal his welterweight belt in June 1980, and of course the second only five months later, when Duran famously told the referee “No mas” in the eighth round as Leonard was running circles around him. He also lost a close decision in a third fight in 1989. Duran certainly went on to redeem himself, though, and ended his career with 103 wins and securing his place on experts’ lists of the best fighters of all time.

Usher co-stars as Duran’s rival Sugar Ray Leonard, and Ellen Barkin, Ruben Blades and Ana de Armas co-star.

Hands of Stone debuts on August 26.