Camila Cabello Teams Up with Movement Voter Fund to Launch the Healing Justice Project, Offering Mental Health Support to Frontline Activists

Camila Cabello is spreading healing justice to frontline activists

The 23-year-old Mexican & Cuban singer is partnering with Movement Voter Fund, a charitable nonprofit that connects donors to grassroots organizations, to launch the Healing Justice Project, which will focus on giving frontline activists access to mental health support.

Camila Cabello

Cabello, who will star in Sony’s upcoming Cinderella, donated the seed money for the project and has matched all the funds raised for it to date. The first grant round totals nearly $250,000, and Cabello also has pledged to continue to donate and raise funds for future grant rounds.

The initial cohort of 10 organizations will receive grants to cover six months’ worth of mental healthcare for their activist workers. Each nonprofit has the discretion to spend the money on resources that address its individual needs and are “culturally competent,” meaning that providers are knowledgeable about the anti-racist framework to understand racial trauma. (A May 2018 American Psychological Association report revealed that just 5 percent of active psychologists are Hispanic and 4 percent are Black.)

The Healing Justice Project was inspired in part by conversations Cabello has had with California surgeon general Nadine Burke Harris about the toll of “toxic stress” (prolonged activation of the body’s stress response systems), and with such activists as Latinx Racial Equity Project founder Ana Perez and Jerry Tello, founder of the racial equity group National Compadres Network, about racial reconciliation. Cabello has been interested in both subjects ever since social media posts of hers from 2012 and 2013 featuring racist memes and racial slurs resurfaced in December 2019; the singer said she was “deeply sorry and ashamed” for her use of “horrible and hurtful language” and pledged to use her platform “to speak out about injustice and inequality.”

Cabello reflected further on what she’s learned in a conversation with Tello this week for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s fifth annual National Day of Racial Healing.

“I’ve spent a lot of time over the last couple of years, and especially this past year home during the pandemic, in constant reflection, learning and exploring the ways I have contributed to systems and beliefs that actively oppress others,” Cabello tells The Hollywood Reporter. “I’ve realized there’s so much more I can and must do to support others who are doing the work to heal our communities…. Grassroots organizers are faced with the exhaustion, emotional burden and trauma that comes with fighting against inequitable systems. Our hope is to offer access to the necessary support they may need as they continue their critical work advocating for social justice.”

In addition to amplifying each of the 10 grant recipients through virtual engagements and on her social media accounts over the next few months, Cabello also will work to raise general awareness among the public about the psychological and emotional burnout that activists face, and to normalize mental healing and wellness practices. Prolonged exposure to racial and social injustice has been linked to higher incidences of poor mental health among affected demographics. Last summer a U.S. Census Bureau survey revealed spikes in anxiety and depression among Black and Asian Americans in the wake of George Floyd’s murder and COVID-19-related hate crimes, and a 2018 New York Times story detailed the traumatic burden shouldered by Black Lives Matter activists, two of whom lost their lives by suicide and one by heart attack.

“In the past year, a global pandemic, an overt rise in white nationalist attacks and a deeply fractious presidential election have placed challenges on organizers and activists in ways that will be felt for the long haul,” says MVF senior director Syd Yang. “Unfortunately, they often don’t get adequate support. Our partnership with Camila Cabello on the Healing Justice Project will help fill that gap and allow us to expand our support of BIPOC organizers and raise awareness about the care that is needed to drive sustainable and just social change.”

Cabello worked with MVF to identify the Healing Justice Project’s 10 recipient groups, chosen in part because they are located in regions that have recently been at the epicenters of major racial, social or electoral justice activism, and therefore have elevated levels of exhaustion, trauma and need for mental restoration. They are:

Black Leaders Organizing Communities: BLOC coordinates and harnesses the power of collective political action to represent the needs, concerns and values of local Black communities and businesses in Milwaukee and throughout the state of Wisconsin. “We simply cannot do community engagement and organizing without being mindful of our own traumas and having conversations that allow us to center our wellness,” says BLOC founder and executive director Angela Lang. “We have to take care of ourselves before we can empower anyone else.”

Faith for Justice: The St. Louis-based coalition of Christian activists, who believe that the Bible calls Christians to serve and empower the poor and challenge oppressive systems, supports Black-led organizations and liberation campaigns and helps connect churches to them.

Freedom, Inc.: Based in Madison, the self-described Black and Southeast Asian (Hmong Americans are the largest Asian ethnic group in Wisconsin) nonprofit provides direct services, leadership development and community organizing to achieve social justice among low- to no-income communities of color in Dane County.

Living United for Change in Arizona: LUCHA has worked to improve life for working families through everything from immigration services to policy change, such as its successful 2016 campaign to pass Proposition 206, which provided up to five days of paid sick leave for all employees and raised the minimum wage to $12 in 2020. “This work is difficult and often carries a heavy emotional weight,” says LUCHA co-executive director Alejandra Gomez. “It is so important that we have the practices and resources available to sustain ourselves so we can continue fighting for a better future.”

Gomez to Receive Chart Topper Award at Billboard’s Women in Music Event

Selena Gomez is on a hot streak… And, she’s getting an award to prove it!

The 23-year-old half-Mexican American singer/actress will receive the Chart Topper award at Billboard’s annual Women in Music event, which will take place on December 11 in New York.

Selena Gomez

The prestigious award, won last year by Australian rapper Iggy Azalea, recognizes major career milestones on Billboard’s music charts.

Gomez has been in rare chart form. Her latest album, Revival, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in October with 117,000 equivalent first-week album units.

It’s Gomez’s second U.S. No. 1 album following 2013’s Stars Danceand to date she has enjoyed nearly 6.7 million worldwide album sales and over 22 million single sales.

The first single from Revival, “Good For You” featuring A$AP Rocky, is Gomez’s fastest-ever platinum seller and highest charting single on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 5. “Good For You” spent three consecutive weeks at No. 1 at Top 40 radio.

“In the last few months, Selena has broken onto the scene as an adult, and come into her own as an artist with the success of Revival,” comments Janice Min, co-president and chief creative officer of Guggenheim Media’s Entertainment Group, which consists of Billboard and The Hollywood Reporter. “We want to highlight this moment for a woman who has become a role model for many, a feminist, an independent voice whose new album truly showcases her as a mature artist.”

Lifetime has partnered with Billboard to televise the event for the first time on December 18, which will take place at Cipriani Midtown in New York.

Longoria to Be Honored with Humanitarian Prize at Women In Film Crystal + Lucy Awards

Eva Longoria is a Latina with heart… And, now she’s being recognized for her efforts to give back to the community.

The 39-year-old Mexican American actress, producer and philanthropist will be honored at the Women In Film 2014 Crystal + Lucy Awards, which honor exemplary women in the entertainment industry.

Eva Longoria

Longoria, who was named Philanthropist of the Year by The Hollywood Reporter in 2009 for ‘her commitment to Latino causes and giving back to the community will receive the 2014 Norma Zarky Humanitarian Award.

The former Desperate Housewives star serves as the national spokesperson for Padres Contra El Cancer, a nonprofit committed to improving the lives of Latino children with cancer and their families. She came to Padres in 2003, when she began visiting hospitalized children.

In 2006, Longoria founded Eva’s Heroes, a nonprofit in her hometown of San Antonio. It provides an after-school program with an inclusive setting for individuals with developmental disabilities.

She also serves as exec producer, in collaboration with nonprofit producer Shine Global, on The Harvest, a documentary focusing on the plight of the 500,000 child farm workers in America, most of whom are Latino.

The Crystal + Lucy Awards will be presented on Wednesday, June 11 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza.