Patricia Cardoso Elected to Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Board of Governors

Patricia Cardoso is ready to help govern

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced its 2024-25 Board of Governors, with the Colombian filmmaker among those earning a seat.

Patricia CardosoCardoso, best known for iconic film Real Women Have Curves, is among the list of new first-time governors.

In 2020, the award-winning filmmaker became the first Latina director to be included in the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress after her groundbreaking film “Real Women Have Curves” was added to the registry.

She was elected to the Directors Branch.

Jennifer Fox, who has produced the past several Governors Awards ceremonies, was elected governor of the Producers Branch.

Leaving the board from those positions are current Directors Branch Governor Susanne Bier and Producers Governor Jennifer Todd.

Other first-timers named today are K.K. Barrett for Production Designers, Chris Tashima for Short Films and Andy Nelson for the Sound Branch. Returning to the board after a hiatus is Lois Burwell from Makeup and Hairstylists branch.

Here are the incumbent governors re-elected to the 2024-25 board:

Rita Wilson, Actors Branch
Kim Taylor-Coleman, Casting Directors Branch
Paul Cameron, Cinematographers Branch
Eduardo Castro, Costume Designers Branch
Jean Tsien, Documentary Branch
Pam Abdy, Executives Branch
Terilyn A. Shropshire, Film Editors Branch
Laura C. Kim, Marketing and Public Relations Branch
Lesley Barber, Music Branch
Brooke Breton, Visual Effects Branch
Howard A. Rodman, Writers Branch

They will join returning governors Wendy Aylsworth, Dion Beebe, Howard Berger, Jason Blum, Rob Bredow, Ruth E. Carter, Megan Colligan, Paul Debevec, Peter Devlin, David I. Dinerstein, Ava DuVernay, Linda Flowers, Charles Fox, DeVon Franklin, Rodrigo García, Richard Gibbs, Donna Gigliotti, Jinko Gotoh, Chris Hegedus, Richard Hicks, Lynette Howell Taylor, Kalina Ivanov, Simon Kilmurry, Ellen Kuras, Marlee Matlin, Hannah Minghella, Daniel Orlandi, Missy Parker, Lou Diamond Phillips, Jason Reitman, Nancy Richardson, Stephen Rivkin, Eric Roth, Dana Stevens, Mark P. Stoeckinger, Marlon West, Janet Yang and Debra Zane.

As a result of this election, the 55-member Board comprises 53% women and 27% belonging to an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.

The Academy has 19 branches, each represented by three governors, except for the recently established Animation Branch, represented by two governors; the recently established Short Films Branch, represented by one governor; and the Production and Technology Branch, represented by one governor.  Governors, including the board-appointed governors-at-large, may serve up to two three-year terms (consecutive or non-consecutive), followed by a two-year hiatus, after which eligibility renews for up to two additional three-year terms for a lifetime maximum of 12 years.

Library of Congress Adds Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” to National Film Registry

One of Patricia Cardoso’s most iconic films is being celebrated in a special way… 

The Library of Congress has unveiled its annual selection of 25 films added to the National Film Registry, with the Colombian filmmaker’s Humanitas Prize-winning film Real Women Have Curves—a landmark of Latinx cinema—among the chosen.

Patricia Cardoso

Real Women Have Curves is one of an unprecedented seven titles directed by women, the most in a single year since the inaugural registry in 1989. 

Real Women Have Curves

The comedy-drama—released in 2002—starred America FerreraLupe Ontiveros and George Lopez. It’s the story of a first generation Mexican-American girl (Ferrera) and her passage to womanhood. Although she wants to go away to college, she must battle against the views of her parents, who think she should stay at home and provide for the family. As a compromise, she works with her mother (Ontiveros) in a sewing factory over the summer and learns some important lessons about life, helping her make a decision about her future.

It’s based on the play of the same name by Josefina López, who co-authored the screenplay for the film with George LaVoo. The film gained fame after winning the Audience Award for best dramatic film, and the Special Jury Prizefor acting at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival. According to the Sundance Institute, the film gives a voice to young women who are struggling to love themselves and find respect in the United States.

But it’s not the only LatinX film selected this year…

Zoot Suit, directed by Luis Valdez, made the list. 

Starring Daniel Valdez and Edward James Olmos, Zoot Suitis the1981 film adaptation of the Broadway play of the same name. It weaves a story involving the real-life events of the Sleepy Lagoon murder trial — when a group of young Mexican-Americans were charged with murder — resulting in the racially fueled Zoot Suit Riotsthroughout Los Angeles.

The film was nominated for the 1982 Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy.

Meanwhile, some of the selected films feature Hispanic artists…

Purple Rainstars Mexican American actress/singer Apollonia Kotero; and Platoonstars part-Spanish American actor Charlie Sheen,  

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced the annual selections, which were chosen based on cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage and guarantees the film will be preserved under the National Film Preservation Act. The films must be at least 10 years old.

“The National Film Registry has become an important record of American history, culture and creativity,” said Hayden. “Unlike many other honors, the registry is not restricted to a time, place or genre. It encompasses 130 years of the full American cinematic experience — a virtual Olympiad of motion pictures. With the support of Congress, the studios and other archives, we are ensuring that the nation’s cinematic history will be around for generations to come.” 

The 2019 selection brings the number of films in the registry to 775 and spans a century of filmmaking, from 1903 to 2003. 

Jacqueline Stewart, chair of the National Film Preservation Board’s task force on diversity, equity and inclusion, commented, “With this year’s National Film Registry selections, Dr, Hayden recognizes the importance of amplifying cinematic voices and stories that have been marginalized for far too long. I look forward to continuing research and dialogue with the Librarian, board members, film communities and the American public to ensure that the registry reflects the full spectrum of our society.”

Here’s the full list of this year’s selections:

Amadeus (1984)
Becky Sharp (1935)      
Before Stonewall (1984)
BodyAnd Soul (1925)
Boys Don’t Cry (1999)
Clerks (1994)
Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980)
Emigrants Landing At Ellis Island (1903)
Employees Entrance (1933)    
Fog Of War (2003)         
Gaslight (1944)  
George Washington Carver At Tuskegee Institute (1937)
Girlfriends (1978)
I Am Somebody (1970)
The Last Waltz (1978)
My Name Is Oona (1969)
A New Leaf (1971)        
Old Yeller (1957)
The Phenix City Story (1955)
Platoon (1986)   
Purple Rain (1984)        
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
She’s Gotta Have It (1986)      
Sleeping Beauty (1959)
Zoot Suit (1981)