Beatriz Luengo, Yotuel Romero & Exile Content Studio to Create Documentary Based on Latin Grammy-Winning Cuban Revolution Single “Patria y Vida”

Beatriz Luengo is shining a greater look at her Latin Grammy-winning hit…

The 38-year-old Spanish singer-songwriter’s “Patria y Vida,” the liberty anthem that fueled a new Cuban revolution in the summer, will now become a full-length documentary.

Beatriz Luengo, Patria y Vida, Cuban Revolution, Yotuel Romero, Exile Content Studio, Patria o Muerte, Latin Grammy Awards, Latin Grammys, Orishas, Alexander Delgado, Randy Malcom, Gente de Zona, Descemer Bueno, Maykel Osorbo, El Funky, Chancleta Records

Presented by Exile Content Studio in partnership with singer-songwriters Luengo and Yotuel Romero, the documentary “will explore how the song—its title a repudiation of the 1950’s Cuban Revolution’s slogan ‘Patria o Muerte’—sparked a movement, which the Cuban government has tried to suppress, and investigate how music has been a catalyst for social change throughout modern history,” reads a statement.

“When we see the impact our song has had on the people of Cuba and around the world, we feel privileged to be able to use our platform to tell the story of Cuba and give a voice to a community that is often oppressed,” said Luengo and Romero.

“We’re hopeful we’ll see change in the future and we’re excited to collaborate with Exile to continue to raise awareness and fight for the people of Cuba; to continue to use our voice in a meaningful way.”

The news comes on the heels of “Patria y Vida” winning best urban song and the coveted song of the year at the 2021 Latin Grammy Awards on November 18.

The song was originally penned by Romero (formerly of hip-hop group Orishas), Luengo, Alexander Delgado and Randy Malcom (of Gente de Zona), and Descemer Bueno, and features Cuban voices from within the island, Maykel Osorbo and rapper El Funky.

“I felt we needed to show the two realities: those of us who live outside Cuba, and those who are still on the island, who live the streets there,” Romero previously told Billboard.

The track, released independently on Romero’s Chancleta Records in February, has become the anthem of anti-government protests in Cuba. Its power of mobilization was a factor in the arrests of both El Funky and Osorbo; the latter has been behind bars in Cuba since May when he famously fled from Cuban police aided by demonstrators. Osorbo is the first Cuban political prisoner to win two Latin Grammys.

“We at Exile believe in creating content to inspire Latin Americans to take action to create social change in the world,” said Daniel Eilemberg, president of content at Exile. “We are especially excited at the opportunity to join forces with Bea and Yotuel to produce a documentary about the tremendous power of their song in galvanizing activism to protest the appalling conditions and restrictive political policies in Cuba and the government responsible for them.”

Camilo Tops List of Latin Grammy Nominees with 10 Nods

It’s a perfect 10 for Camilo

The 27-year-old Colombian pop singer-songwriter, whose real name is Camilo Echeverry, leads this year’s Latin Grammy Award nominees.

Camilo

Camilo is nominated in 10 categories, including album of the year, song of the year and record of the year, for which he’s twice nominated: for “Vida de Rico” and “Amén.”

The latter is a collaboration with his wife, Evaluna Montaner, her brothers Mau y Ricky and their father, Argentine-Venezuelan hitmaker Ricardo Montaner.

Dominican bachata pioneer Juan Luis Guerra picked up six nominations, including album of the year and record of the year.

He’s also a contender in the tropical and traditional pop vocal categories, for songs from his “Privé” EP.

Tangana, the Spanish rapper-singer who won two Latin Grammys for songwriting on Rosalía’s “El Mal Querer,” scored five nominations, including album of the year for “El Madrileño.”

His “Te Olvidaste,” which features first-time nominee and L.A.-based indie rocker Omar Apollo, is nominated for record of the year.

Bad Bunny is in the running for four awards this year, including album of the year for “El Último Tour del Mundo.”

Dákiti,” his joint reggaetón-pop hit with Jhay Cortez, made history when it topped both the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart and the Global 200; it peaked at No. 5 on the Hot 100. Still, “Dákiti” was not nominated for either record or song of the year; instead, it is up for best urban song.

Regional Mexican music is sparsely represented in major categories this year. Most notably, “Que Se Sepa Nuestro Amor,” the steamy mariachi duet by Mon Laferte and Alejandro Fernández, is nominated for song of the year, while “Un Canto por México, Vol. II,” by 14-time Latin Grammy winner Natalia Lafourcade, is up for album of the year. (Lafourcade won album of the year in 2020 for “Un Canto por México, Vol. I.”)

Women make up more than half of the 11 best new artist nominees; among them are Chilean-American R&B star Paloma Mami, Argentine YouTuber-turned-singer María Becerra and queer Dominican artist and novelist Rita Indiana.

After being passed over for best new artist in 2020, Puerto Rican urban star Rauw Alejandro received record and song of the year nominations for his 2021 disco-revival smash “Todo de Ti.” His single with Camilo, “Tattoo (Remix),” is nominated for urban fusion/performance.

Reggaetón star J Balvin is nominated for song of the year and urban song for “Agua,” his collaboration with Tainy. “Agua” was the lead single from the soundtrack for “The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run.”

Patria y Vida,” which was adopted by protesters during this summer’s uprisings against the Cuban government, is nominated for song of the year and urban song. The collaboration among Cuban artists — both living on and exiled from the island — has resonated far beyond the country and its diaspora. The song is performed by Gente de Zona, Yotuel Romero of Orishas, Descemer Bueno, Eliécer “El Funky” Márquez and Maykel Osorbo, a rapper who reportedly has been detained in Cuba since May 18.

The Weeknd, who in November called the English-language Grammys “corrupt” after he failed to receive any nominations, has been nominated for a Latin Grammy. “Hawái (Remix),” his hit song with Colombian pop star Maluma, is nominated for urban fusion/performance.

After a COVID-conscious virtual ceremony in 2020, this year’s Latin Grammys will be broadcast from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on Nov. 18.

Here’s a look at this year’s nominees:

Grabación del Año
1. SI HUBIERAS QUERIDO; Pablo Alborán
2. TODO DE TI; Rauw Alejandro
3. UN AMOR ETERNO (VERSIÓN BALADA); Marc Anthony
4. A TU LADO; Paula Arenas
5. BOHEMIO; Andrés Calamaro & Julio Iglesias
6. VIDA DE RICO; Camilo
7. SUÉLTAME, BOGOTÁ; Diamante Eléctrico
8. AMÉN; Ricardo Montaner, Mau y Ricky, Camilo, Evaluna Montaner
9. DIOS ASÍ LO QUISO; Ricardo Montaner & Juan Luis Guerra
10. TE OLVIDASTE; C. Tangana & Omar Apollo
11. TALVEZ; Caetano Veloso & Tom Veloso

Álbum del Año
1. VÉRTIGO; Pablo Alborán
2. MIS AMORES; Paula Arenas
3. EL ÚLTIMO TOUR DEL MUNDO; Bad Bunny
4. SALSWING!; Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta
5. MIS MANOS; Camilo
6. NANA, TOM, VINICIUS; Nana Caymmi
7. PRIVÉ; Juan Luis Guerra
8. ORIGEN; Juanes
9. UN CANTO POR MÉXICO, VOL. II; Natalia Lafourcade
10. EL MADRILEÑO; C. Tangana

Canción del Año
1. A TU LADO; Paula Arenas & Maria Elisa Ayerbe, songwriters (Paula Arenas)
2. A VECES; Diamante Eléctrico
3. AGUA; J Balvin, Alejandro Borrero, Jhay Cortez, Kevyn
4. CANCIÓN BONITA; Rafa Arcaute, Ricky Martin, Mauricio Rengifo, Andrés Torres & Carlos Vives
5. DIOS ASÍ LO QUISO; Camilo, David Julca, Jonathan Julca, Yasmil Jesús Marrufo & Ricardo Montaner
6. HAWÁI; Édgar Barrera, René Cano, Kevyn Cruz, Johan Espinosa, Kevin Jiménez, Miky La Sensa, Bryan Lezcano, Maluma, Andrés Uribe & Juan Camilo Vargas
7. MI GUITARRA; Javier Limón, songwriter (Javier Limón, Juan Luis Guerra & Nella
8. PATRIA Y VIDA; Descemer Bueno, El Funky, Gente De Zona, Yadam González, Beatriz Luengo, Maykel Osorbo & Yotuel
9. QUE SE SEPA NUESTRO AMOR; El David Aguilar & Mon Laferte
10. SI HUBIERAS QUERIDO; Pablo Alborán, Nicolás “Na’vi” De La Espriella, Diana Fuentes & Julio Reyes Copello
11. TODO DE TI; Rauw Alejandro, José M. Collazo, Luis J. González, Rafael E. Pabón Navedo & Eric Pérez Rovira,
12. VIDA DE RICO
Édgar Barrera & Camilo

Mejor Nuevo Artista
1. GIULIA BE
2. MARÍA BECERRA
3. BIZARRAP
4. BOZA
5. ZOE GOTUSSO
6. HUMBE
7. RITA INDIANA
8. LASSO
9. PALOMA MAMI
10. MARCO MARES
11. JULIANA VELÁSQUEZ

Mejor Álbum Vocal Pop
1. DIOS LOS CRÍA; Andrés Calamaro
2. MIS MANOS; Camilo
3. MUNAY; Pedro Capó
4. K.O.; Danna Paola
5. DE MÉXICO; Reik

POP
Mejor Álbum Vocal Pop Tradicional
1. VÉRTIGO; Pablo Alborán
2. MIS AMORES; Paula Arenas
3. PRIVÉ; Juan Luis Guerra
4. DOCE MARGARITAS; Nella
5. ATLÁNTICO A PIE; Diego Torres

Mejor Canción Pop
1. ADIÓS; Sebastián Yatra
2. AHÍ; Nella/ Doce Margaritas
3. CANCIÓN BONITA; Carlos Vives & Ricky Martin)
4. LA MUJER; Mon Laferte & Gloria Trevi
5. VIDA DE RICO; Camilo

URBANA

Mejor Fusión/Interpretación Urbana
1. EL AMOR ES UNA MODA; Alcover, Juan Magan & Don Omar
2. TATTOO (REMIX); Rauw Alejandro & Camilo
3. NATHY PELUSO: BZRP MUSIC SESSIONS, VOL.36.; Bizarrap & Nathy Peluso
4. DIPLOMATICO; Major Lazer / Guaynaa
5. HAWÁI (REMIX); Maluma & The Weeknd

Mejor interpretación de reggaetón
“Tu veneno”; J. Balvin
“La tóxica”; Farruko;
“Bichota”, Karol G
“Caramelo”; Ozuna
“La curiosidad”; Jay Wheeler, DJ Nelson y Myke Towers.

Mejor álbum de música urbana
“Goldo Funky”; Akapellah
“El último tour del mundo”; Bad Bunny
“Monarca”; Eladio Carrion
“Enoc”; Ozuna
“Lyke Mike”; Myke Towers

Mejor canción de rap/hip hop:
“Booker T”; Bad Bunny y Marco Daniel Borrero
“Condenados”; Akapellah y Pedro Querales
“La vendedora del placer”; Lito MC Cassidy
“Sana sana”; Rafa Arcaute, Nathy Peluso
“Snow Tha Product’: BZRP Music Sessions, Vol. 39”,; Bizarrap, Snow Tha Product

Mejor canción urbana
“A fuego”; Farina
“Agua”; Tainy & J Balvin)
“Dákiti”; Bad Bunny y Jhay Cortez
“La curiosidad”; Myke Towers
“Patria y vida”; Yotuel, Gente de Zona, Descemer Bueno, Maykel Osorbo, El Funky

ROCK

Mejor álbum de rock
“Curso de levitación intensivo”; Bunbury
“Control”; Caramelos de Cianuro
“Los Mesoneros Live desde Pangea”; Los Mesoneros
“Luz”; No Te Va Gustar
“El pozo brillante”; Vicentico.

Mejor canción de rock
“Ahora 1”; Vicentico
“Distintos”, Andrés Giménez y Andreas Kisser, compositores (De La Tierra)
“El sur”, Santi Balmes y Julián Saldarriaga, compositores (Love of Lesbian con Bunbury)
“Hice todo mal”; Anabella Cartolano, compositora (Las Ligas Menores)
“Venganza”; Emiliano Brancciari y Nicki Nicole, compositores (No Te Va Gustar y Nicki Nicole).

Mejor álbum de pop/rock
“Mira lo que me hiciste hacer”; Diamante Eléctrico
“Mis grandes éxitos”; Adan Jodorowsky & The French Kiss
“Origen”; Juanes
“V. E. H. N.”; Love of Lesbian
“El reflejo”; Rayos Láser.

Mejor canción de pop/rock
“A veces”, Diamante Eléctrico, compositores (Diamante Eléctrico)
“Cosmos (antisistema solar)”; Santi Balmes y Julián Saldarriaga, compositores (Love of Lesbian)
“El duelo”; Sergio Eduardo Acosta y León Larregui, compositores (Zoé)
“Ganas”; Zoe Gotusso, Nicolás Landa y Diego Mema, compositores (Zoe Gotusso)
“Hong Kong”; C. Tangana y Andrés Calamaro

ALTERNATIVA
Mejor álbum de música alternativa
“Kick I”; Arca
“Tropiplop”; Aterciopelados
“Cabra”; Cabra
“Un segundo MTV Unplugged”; Café Tacvba
“Calambre”; Nathy Peluso.

Mejor canción alternativa
“Agarrate”; Nathy Peluso
“Antidiva”,Aterciopelados
“Confía”; Gepe y Vincentico
“Nominao”; C. Tangana y Jorge Drexler
“Te olvidaste”, C. Tangana y Omar Apollo

TROPICAL

Mejor álbum de salsa
“Salsa Plus!”; Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta
“En cuarentena”; El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico
“El día es hoy”; Willy García
“Colegas”; Gilberto Santa Rosa
“En Barranquilla me quedo, el disco homenaje a Joe Arroyo”; varios artistas.

Mejor álbum de cumbia/vallenato
“Las locuras mías”; Silvestre Dangond
“Pa’ que se esmigajen los parlantes”; Diego Daza y Carlos Rueda
“De Buenos Aires para el mundo”; Los Ángeles Azules
“Esencia”, Felipe Peláez
“Noche de serenata”, Osmar Pérez y Geño Gamez.

Mejor álbum de merengue y/o bachata:
“Bachata Queen”; Alexandra
“Love Dance Merengue”; Manny Cruz
“El papá de la bachata su legado (Añoñado I, II, III, IV)”; Luis Segura
“Es merengue, ¿algún problema?”; Sergio Vargas
“Insensatez; Fernando Villalona

Mejor álbum tropical tradicional
“Gente con alma”; José Aguirre Cali Big Band
“Chabuco en La Habana”; Chabuco
“Cha cha chá: Homenaje a lo tradicional”; Alain Pérez, Issac Delgado y Orquesta Aragón
“Solos”; Jon Secada y Gonzalo Rubalcaba
“Alma cubana”; Leoni Torres

Mejor álbum contemporáneo/fusión tropical:
“Legendarios”; Billos
“Río abajo”; Diana Burco
“Brazil 305”; Gloria Estefan
“Acertijos”; Pedrito Martínez
“La música del carnaval – XX aniversario”
Juventino Ojito y su Son Mocaná.

Mejor canción tropical
“Bolero a la vida”; Omara Portuondo con Gaby Moreno
“Dios así lo quiso”; Ricardo Montaner y Juan Luis Guerra
“Más feliz que ayer”; Chabuco
“Pambiche de novia”; Juan Luis Guerra
“Un sueño increíble (homenaje a Jairo Varela)”; Dayhan Díaz y Charlie Cardona

CANTAUTOR

Mejor álbum cantautor
“Alemorología”; AleMor
“Mendó”; Alex Cuba
“Seis’; Mon Laferte
“Mañana te escribo otra canción”; Covi Quintana
“El árbol y el bosque”; Rozalén

REGIONAL MEXICANA

Mejor álbum de música ranchera/mariachi
“Cuando te enamores”; El Bebeto
“A mis 80’s”; Vicente Fernández
“#Charramillennial – Lady”; Nora González
“Ayayay! (Súper Deluxe)”; Christian Nodal
“Soy México”; Pike Romero

Mejor álbum de música banda
“Concierto mundial digital live”; Banda El Recodo de Cruz Lizárraga
“Vivir la vida”; Banda Los Recoditos
“Sin miedo al éxito’; Banda Los Sebastianes
“Llegando al rancho”; Joss Favela
“Nos divertimos logrando lo imposible”; Grupo Firme.

Mejor álbum de música tejana
“Pa’ la pista y pa’l pisto, Vol. 2”; El Plan
“Back on Track”; Ram Herrera
“Histórico”; La Fiebre
“Incomparable”; Sólido
“Un beso es suficiente”; Vilax.

Mejor álbum de música norteña
“Vamos bien”; Calibre 50
“De vieja escuela”; Gera Demara
“Diez”; La Energía Norteña
“Al estilo rancherón”; Los Dos Carnales
“Recordando a una leyenda”; Los Plebes del Rancho de Ariel Camacho y Christian Nodal
“Volando alto”
Palomo.

Mejor canción regional mexicana
“Aquí abajo”; Christian Nodal
“Cicatrices”; Nora González con Lupita Infante
“40 y 21”; Erika Vidrio, compositor (Beto Zapata);
“Que se sepa nuestro amor”; Mon Laferte y Alejandro Fernández
“Tuyo y mío”; Camilo y Los Dos Carnales

INSTRUMENTAL

Mejor álbum instrumental
“Entretiempo y tiempo”; Omar Acosta y Sergio Menem
“Cristovão Bastos e Rogério Caetano”; Cristovão Bastos e Rogério Caetano
“Canto da praya – Ao vivo”; Hamilton de Holanda e Mestrinho
“Le Petit Garage (Live)”; Ara Malikian
“Toquinho e Yamandu Costa – Bachianinha (Live at Rio Montreux Jazz Festival)”; Toquinho e Yamandu Costa.

TRADICIONAL

Mejor álbum folklórico
“Amor pasado”; Leonel García
“Jemas”; Tato Marenco
“Ancestras”; Petrona Martinez
“Renacer”; Nahuel Pennisi
“Vocal”; Alejandro Zavala.

Mejor álbum de tango
“Tango of the Americas”; Pan American Symphony Orchestra
“348”; Federico Pereiro
“100 años”; Quinteto Revolucionario
“Tanghetto Plays Piazzolla”; Tanghetto
“Tinto Tango Plays Piazzolla” Tinto Tango.

Mejor álbum de música flamenca
“Alma de pura raza”; Paco Candela
“Un nuevo universo”; Pepe de Lucía
“Amor”; Israel Fernández y Diego del Morao
“Herencia”, Rafael Riqueni
“El rey”; María Toledo

JAZZ

Mejor álbum de jazz latino/jazz:
“Bruma: Celebrating Milton Nascimento”; Antonio Adolfo
“Ontology”; Roxana Amed
“Family”; Edmar Castaneda
“Voyager”; Iván Melon Lewis
“El arte del bolero”; Miguel Zenón y Luis Perdomo.

CRISTIANA

Mejor álbum cristiano (en español)
“Hora dorada”; Anagrace
“Ya me vi”; Aroddy
“Redención”; Aline Barros
“Vida encontré”; Majo y Dan
“Milagro de amar”; William Perdomo.

Mejor álbum cristiano (en portugués):
“Catarse: Lado B”; Daniela Araújo
“Sarah Farias (Ao Vivo)”; Sarah Farias
“Seguir Teu Coração”; Anderson Freire
“Sentido”; Leonardo Gonçalves
“Elis Soares 10 Anos”; Elis Soares.

LENGUA PORTUGUESA

Mejor álbum de pop contemporáneo en lengua portuguesa
“Cor”; Anavitória
“A Bolha”; Vitor Kley
“Duda Beat & Nando Reis”; Nando Reis & Duda Beat
“Será Que Você Vai Acreditar”; Fernanda Takai
“Chegamos Sozinhos em Casa Vol 1”; Tuyo.

Mejor álbum de rock o música alternativa en lengua portuguesa:
“Álbum Rosa”; A Cor Do Som
“Emidoinã”; André Abujamra
“OXEAXEEXU”; BaianaSystem
“Assim Tocam os MEUS TAMBORES”; Marcelo D2
“Fôlego”; Scalem
“O Bar Me Chama”; Velhas Virgens.

Mejor álbum de samba/pagode
“Rio: Só Vendo a Vista”; Martinho Da Vila
“Sempre Se Pode Sonhar”; Paulinho Da Viola
“Nei Lopes, Projeto Coisa Fina e Guga Stroeter No Pagode Black Tie”; Nei Lopes, Projeto Coisa Fina e Guga Stroeter
“Samba de Verão”; Diogo Nogueira
“Onze (Músicas Inéditas de Adoniran Barbosa)”; varios artistas.

Mejor álbum de música popular brasileña
“Canções D’ Além Mar”; Zeca Baleiro
H.O.J.E”; Delia Fischer
“Tempo de Viver”; Thiago Holanda
“Bom Mesmo É Estar Debaixo D’água”; Luedji Luna
“Do Meu Coração Un”; Zé Manoel.

Mejor álbum de música sertaneja
“Tempo de Romance”; Chitãozinho e Xororó
“Daniel Em Casa”; Daniel
“Patroas”; Marília Mendonça, Maiara & Maraísa
“Conquistas”; Os Barões da Pisadinha
“Para Ouvir No Fone”; Michel Teló.

Mejor álbum de música de raíces en lengua portuguesa
“Sambadeiras”; Luiz Caldas
“Do Coração”; Sara Correia
“Orin a Língua Dos Anjos”; Orquestra Afrosinfônica
“Eu e Vocês”; Elba Ramalho
“Arraiá da Veveta”; Ivete Sangalo.

Mejor canción en lengua portuguesa
“A Cidade”; Chico Chico e João Mantuano
“Amores e Flores”; Melim
“Espera a Primavera”; Nando Reis
“Lágrimas de Alegria”; Maneva & Natiruts
“Lisboa”; Anavitória e Lenine
“Mulheres Não Têm Que Chorar”; Ivete Sangalo y Emicida

NIÑOS

Mejor álbum de música latina para niños
“Otra vuelta al sol”; Cantoalegre
“Danilo & Chapis, Vol. 1”; Danilo & Chapis
“Canciones de cuna”; Mi Casa Es Tu Casa
“Nanas consentidoras”; Victoria Sur
“Tu Rockcito Filarmónico”; Tu Rockcito y Orquesta Filarmónica de Medellín

CLÁSICA

Mejor Álbum de música clásica
“Revolution: Beethoven – Symphonies 1 á 5”; Jordi Savall & Le Concert des Nations; Jordi Savall, director; Manuel Mohino, productor
“Claudio Santoro: A Obra Integral para Violoncelo e Piano”; Ney Fialkow & Hugo Pilger; Maria de Fátima Nunes Pilger & Hugo Pilger, productores
“Latin American Classics”; Kristhyan Benitez; Jon Feidner, productor
“Music from Cuba and Spain, Sierra: Sonata para guitarra”, Manuel Barrueco; Asgerdur Sigurdardottir, productor
“Tres historias concertantes”; Héctor Infanzón; Konstantin Dobroykov, director; Héctor Infanzón, productor.

Mejor obra/composición clásica contemporánea
“Concierto para violín y orquesta – Remembranzas”; Héctor Infanzón y William Harvey
“Cuatro”; Orlando Jacinto García con Amernet String Quartet
“Desde la tierra que habito”; Eddie Mora, compositor (Ensamble Contemporáneo Universitario (ECU) & Banda de Conciertos de Cartago (BCC))
“Falling Out of Time”; Osvaldo Golijov
“Music from Cuba and Spain, Sierra: Sonata para guitarra”; Manuel Barrueco.

ARREGLO

Mejor arreglo
“Blue in Green (Sky and Sea)”; Kendall Moore, arreglista (Roxana Amed)
“Tierra mestiza”; César Orozco, arreglista (America Viva Band)
“Adiós Nonino”; Jorge Calandrelli, arreglista (Jorge Calandrelli)
“Um Beijo”; Vince Mendoza, arreglista (Melody Gardot)
“Ojalá que llueva café (versión privé)”; Juan Luis Guerra, arreglista (Juan Luis Guerra).

DISEÑO DE EMPAQUE

Mejor diseño de empaque
“Colegas”; Ana Gonzalez, directora de arte (Gilberto Santa Rosa)
“Lo que me dé la gana”; Boa Mistura, directores de arte (Dani Martín)
“Madrid Nuclear”; Emilio Lorente, director de arte (Leiva)
“Puta”, Emilio Lorente, director de arte (Zahara)
“Tragas o escupes”; Marc Donés, director de arte (Jarabe de Palo).

PRODUCCIÓN
Mejor ingeniería de grabación para un álbum

“BPM”
Nelson Carvalho, ingeniero; Leo Aldrey y Rafael Giner, mezcladores; Tiago de Sousa, engeniero de masterización (Salvador Sobral)

“Bruma: Celebrating Milton Nascimento”
Roger Freret, ingeniero; Claudio Spiewak, mezclador; André Dias, ingeniero de masterización (Antonio Adolfo)

“El madrileño”
Orlando Aispuro Meneses, Daniel Alanís, Alizzz, Rafa Arcaute, Josdán Luis Cohimbra Acosta, Miguel De La Vega, Máximo Espinosa Rosell, Alex Ferrer, Luis Garcié, Billy Garedella, Patrick Liotard, Ed Maverick, Beto Mendonça, Jaime Navarro, Alberto Pérez, Nathan Phillips, Harto Rodríguez y Federico Vindver, ingenieros; Delbert Bowers, Alex Ferrer, Jaycen Joshua, Nineteen85, Lewis Pickett, Alex Psaroudakis y Raül Refree, mezcladores; Chris Athens, ingeniero de masterización (C. Tangana)

“Iceberg”
Mauro Araújo, ingeniero; Andre Kassin, mezclador; Carlos Freitas, ingeniero de masterización (Priscila Tossan)

“Un canto por México, Vol. II”
Pepe Aguilar, Rodrigo Cuevas, José Luis Fernández, Camilo Froideval, Edson R. Heredia, Manu Jalil, Rubén López Arista, Nacho Molino, David Montuy, Lucas Nunes, Alan Ortiz Grande y Alan Saucedo, ingenieros; Rubén López Arista, mezclador; Michael Fuller, ingeniero de masterización (Natalia Lafourcade).

Productor del año
Alizzz
Edgar Barrera
Bizarrap
Marcos Sánchez
Dan Warner.

VIDEO

Mejor video musical versión corta
“Un amor eterno”; Marc Anthony
“Reza Forte”; BaianaSystem con BNegão
“Mi huella”; Fuel Fandango con Maria Jose Llergo
“Visceral”; Fran, Carlos Do Complexo & Bibi Caetano
“De una vez”; Selena Gomez.

Mejor video musical versión larga
“Un segundo MTV Unplugged”; Café Tacvba
“Mulher”; Carolina Deslandes
“Entre mar y palmeras”; Juan Luis Guerra
“Origen (documental)”; Juanes
“Quien me tañe escucha mis voces (documental)”; Gastón Lafourcade

Beatriz Luengo’s “Havana Street Party Presents” Concert Special Streaming on HBO Max

Beatriz Luengo has bared it all…

The 38-year-old Spanish singer, songwriter and actress appeared in an intimate concert special filmed in Havana, Cuba, that premiered on HBO Latino on Friday, February 12.

Beatriz Luengo

The second installment of the HBO concert series “Havana Street Party Presents” — filmed before the global pandemic — not only includes live performances of Luengo’s Cuerpo y Alma album, but also taps into personal stories and empowering anecdotes as told by Luengo.

“Prior to the tour that was expected to start in 2020, I started making this documentary as a way to show my fans what my show would be like and as a presentation for those who don’t know me,” Luengo tells Billboard.

Of her 2018 album, she explains “cuerpo” are the songs she composes on top of beats, for artists like Daddy Yankee, Ozuna, Wisin, Yandel. “Alma” are the songs she pens for organic instruments, for artists like Reik, Thalia, Ha*Ash, Alejandra Guzman, and Ricky Martin.

“This concert is an opportunity to show how a woman has managed to become a songwriter in such a difficult industry,” she says.

Filmed at the doors of an ancient castle in Habana for a select group of local fans, Luengo’s special guests include Manuel Medrano, Farina, Blas Cantó, and Orishas. She’s accompanied by a gospel choir, string quintet, and live DJ throughout the show.

For Luengo, it was important to bring her concept to life, fusing melancholy with modernity, the past with the future.

“We created a very special ambiance,” she says. “I feel that it is a way of projecting and giving hope, showing the Cuban youth all the advanced technology, such as mapping. The entire production has a very strong message for me. Cuba deserves the best.”

Meanwhile, Luengo is making the rounds with the Yotuel and Omar Montes-assisted “Rebelde,” which has become a viral sensation on TikTok with its vogue-meets-flamenco dance. “It exploded!” she expresses. “The TikTok videos are giving me life, all the outfits, and concepts. I love to see how your music can generate a person’s creativity or simply have fun.”

“Havana Street Party presents Beatriz Luengo” is currently streaming on HBO Max.

Cardi B Makes Rap History While Winning First-Ever Grammy Award

It’s official! Cardi Bis a Grammy winner…

The 26-year-old half-Dominican American rap sensation, a five-time nominee at this year’s Grammy Awards show, didn’t leave empty-handed.

Cardi B

Cardi B took home the award for Best Rap Album for chart-topping debut album Invasion of Privacy, becoming the first woman to win the prize.

50-year-old Argentine Singer/songwriter Claudia Brant, who has built a career as one of the top songwriters in Latin music, won as a performer in the Best Latin Pop Albumcategory for Sincera, a collection of personal, heartfelt songs set to acoustic, Brazilian-tinged arrangements, courtesy of producers/engineers Cheche Alaraand Moogie Canazio. 

The Best Latin Rock/Alternative/Urban Albumwent to Mexican band Zoé’s Aztlan in a hard to predict category where the alternative sounds of Monsiuer Perinéand the urban sounds of Orishas also stood a good chance of winning. 

There were no big commercial releases in the Best Tropical Albumcategory, which went to critically acclaimed Spanish Harlem Orchestrafor Anniversary

The only fully expected win was Luis Miguel’s, for his Latin Grammywinning ¡México Por Siempre!

Earlier in the evening, Lucy Kalantari, who won Best Children’s Albumfor All The Sounds by Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats, gave a shout out to her mom in Dominican Republic.

“This album was recorded by a Latina woman. It was produced by a woman,” she said.

Here are the artists, albums and songs that received awards.

Record of the Year
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Album of the Year
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Song of the Year
“This Is America” — Donald Glover and Ludwig Goransson, songwriters (Childish Gambino)

Best New Artist
Dua Lipa

Best Pop Solo Performance
“Joanne (Where Do You Think You’re Goin’?)” — Lady Gaga

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Best Pop Vocal Album
“Sweetener” — Ariana Grande

Best Rock Performance
“When Bad Does Good” — Chris Cornell

Best Rock Song
“Masseduction” — Jack Antonoff and Annie Clark, songwriters (St. Vincent)

Best Rock Album
“From the Fires” — Greta Van Fleet

Best Alternative Music Album
“Colors” — Beck

Best R&B Performance
“Best Part” — H.E.R. featuring Daniel Caesar

Best Urban Contemporary Album
“Everything Is Love” — The Carters

Best R&B Album
“H.E.R.” — H.E.R.

Best Rap Performance
“King’s Dead” — Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future and James Blake and “Bubblin” — Anderson .Paak

Best Rap Song
“God’s Plan” — Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Brock Korsan, Ron LaTour, Matthew Samuels and Noah Shebib, songwriters (Drake)

Best Rap Album
“Invasion of Privacy” — Cardi B

Best Country Solo Performance
“Butterflies” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Country Album
“Golden Hour” — Kacey Musgraves

Best Jazz Instrumental Album
“Emanon” — The Wayne Shorter Quartet

Best Latin Pop Album
“Sincera” — Claudia Brant

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album
“Aztlán” — Zoé

Best Americana Album
“By the Way, I Forgive You” — Brandi Carlile

Best Song Written for Visual Media
“Shallow” — Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando and Andrew Wyatt, songwriters (Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Pharrell Williams

Best Music Video
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Best Comedy Album
“Equanimity & the Bird Revelation” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album
“The Band’s Visit” — Etai Benson, Adam Kantor, Katrina Lenk and Ari’el Stachel, principal soloists; Dean Sharenow and David Yazbek, producers; David Yazbek, composer and lyricist

Best Instrumental Composition
“Blut Und Boden (Blood and Soil)” — Terence Blanchard

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella
“Stars and Stripes Forever” — John Daversa

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals
“Spiderman Theme” — Mark Kibble, Randy Waldman and Justin Wilson, arrangers

Best Recording Package
“Masseduction” — Willo Perron, art director

Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package
“Squeeze Box: The Complete Works of ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic” — Meghan Foley, Annie Stoll and Al Yankovic, art directors

Best Album Notes
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — David Evans, album notes writer

Best Historical Album
“Voices of Mississippi: Artists and Musicians Documented by William Ferris” — William Ferris, April Ledbetter and Steven Lance Ledbetter, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
“Colors” — Julian Burg, Serban Ghenea, David “Elevator” Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin, Florian Lagatta, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco, Jesse Shatkin, Darrell Thorp and Cassidy Turbin, engineers; Chris Bellman, Tom Coyne, Emily Lazar and Randy Merrill, mastering engineers

Best Remixed Recording
“Walking Away (Mura Masa remix)” — Alex Crossan, remixer

Best Immersive Audio Album
“Eye in the Sky – 35th Anniversary Edition” — Alan Parsons, surround mix engineer; Dave Donnelly, P.J. Olsson and Alan Parsons, surround mastering engineers; Alan Parsons, surround producer

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album
“Steve Gadd Band” — Steve Gadd

Band Best Gospel Performance/Song
“Never Alone” — Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin and Victoria Kelly, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“You Say” — Lauren Daigle; Lauren Daigle, Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, songwriters

Best Gospel Album
“Hiding Place” — Tori Kelly

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
“Look Up Child” — Lauren Daigle

Best Roots Gospel Album
“Unexpected” — Jason Crabb

Best World Music Album
“Freedom” — Soweto Gospel Choir

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media
“The Greatest Showman” — Hugh Jackman (and Various Artists); Alex Lacamoire, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul and Greg Wells, compilation producers

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
“Black Panther” — Ludwig Göransson, composer

Best New Age Album
 “Opium Moon” — Opium Moon

Best American Roots Performance
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile

Best American Roots Song
“The Joke” — Brandi Carlile, Dave Cobb, Phil Hanseroth and Tim Hanseroth, songwriters

Best Bluegrass Album
“The Travelin’ Mccourys” — The Travelin’ Mccourys

Best Traditional Blues Album
“The Blues Is Alive and Well” — Buddy Guy

Best Contemporary Blues Album
“Please Don’t Be Dead” — Fantastic Negrito

Best Folk Album
“All Ashore” — Punch Brothers

Best Children’s Album
“All the Sounds” — Lucy Kalantari & the Jazz Cats

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling)
“Faith – A Journey for All” — Jimmy Carter

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)
“¡México Por Siempre!” — Luis Miguel

Best Tropical Latin Album
“Anniversary” — Spanish Harlem Orchestra

Best Regional Roots Music Album
“No ‘Ane’i” — Kalani Pe’a

Best Music Film
“Quincy” — Quincy Jones; Alan Hicks and Rashida Jones, video directors; Paula Dupré Pesmen, video producer

Best Country Duo/Group Performance
“Tequila” — Dan + Shay

Best Country Song
“Space Cowboy” — Luke Laird, Shane Mcanally and Kacey Musgraves, songwriters

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album
“My Way” — Willie Nelson

Best Engineered Album, Classical
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Shawn Murphy and Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer

Producer of the Year, Classical
Blanton Alspaugh

Best Orchestral Performance
“Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11” — Andris Nelsons, conductor

Best Opera Recording
“Bates: The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs” — Michael Christie, conductor; Sasha Cooke, Jessica E. Jones, Edward Parks, Garrett Sorenson and Wei Wu; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer

Best Choral Performance
“Mcloskey: Zealot Canticles” — Donald Nally, conductor

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance
“Anderson, Laurie: Landfall” — Laurie Anderson and Kronos Quartet

Best Classical Instrumental Solo
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — James Ehnes; Ludovic Morlot, conductor

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album
“Songs of Orpheus – Monteverdi, Caccini, D’india & Landi” — Karim Sulayman; Jeannette Sorrell, conductor; Apollo’s Fire, ensembles

Best Classical Compendium
“Fuchs: Piano Concerto ‘spiritualist’; Poems of Life; Glacier; Rush” — Joann Falletta, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition
“Kernis: Violin Concerto” — Aaron Jay Kernis, composer

Best Dance Recording
“Electricity” — Silk City and Dua Lipa featuring Diplo and Mark Ronson

Best Dance/Electronic Album
“Woman Worldwide” — Justice

Best Reggae Album
“44/876” — Sting and Shaggy

Best Improvised Jazz Solo
“Don’t Fence Me In” — John Daversa, soloist. Track from: “American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom”

Best Jazz Vocal Album
“The Window” — Cécile Mclorin Salvant

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album
“American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom” — John Daversa Big Band featuring DACA Artists

Best Latin Jazz Album
“Back to the Sunset” — Dafnis Prieto Big Band

Best Traditional R&B Performance
“Bet Ain’t Worth the Hand” — Leon Bridges and “How Deep Is Your Love” — PJ Morton featuring Yebba

Best R&B Song
“Boo’d Up” — Larrance Dopson, Joelle James, Ella Mai and Dijon Mcfarlane, songwriters

Best Metal Performance
“Electric Messiah” — High on Fire

Best Rap/Sung Performance
“This Is America” — Childish Gambino

Orishas Reunites to Record New Music

Orishas is making a comeback…

The Cuban hip-hop group that pioneered a distinctly Cuban style with international appeal and opened a window to the world on the urban music scene in Havana, has announced they are reuniting to make an album to be released in 2016.

Orishas

“We are making the first single from our new album,” Yotuel Romero, the Orishas frontman who has since gone on to compose hits for Ricky Martin and other Latin artists, posted on Facebook on Christmas Eve. “…The Gods are back my people!!!!!”

Yotuel, known by his first name, Hiram Riverí Medina, called Ruzzo Medina, and Roldán González Rivero formed the Latin Grammy-winning and Grammy-nominated group in 1999 in Paris, where they were all living at the time.

They released the revelatory album A Lo Cubano in 2000, and followed it up with three other albums and a retrospective compilation album before splitting up in 2010.

The trio updated their once stagnant Orishas Facebook page over the holiday with a new photo of the trio recording in Havana.