E! Kicking Off “True Hollywood Story” Reboot with Cardi B Episode

Cardi B is kicking off E!’s iconic docuseries…

The entertainment network’s television docuseries True Hollywood Story will officially return on Monday, March 15, starting with an in-depth look at the 28-year-old half-Dominican American Grammy-winning rapper.

Cardi B

The first episode will track how the “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)” rapper built herself from the ground up, including interviews with television producer Mona Scott-Young (VH1‘s Love & Hip Hop), “Bodak Yellow” music video director Picture Perfect and fellow New York rapper Maino.

The rest of the second season’s episodes will focus on the tragic deaths of Selena and Christina Grimmie at the hands of those obsessed with them (“Death of Innocence” will air March 29); the sisterhood bond that withstands the celebrity spotlight between Beyoncé and Solange KnowlesBritney and Jamie Lynn Spears, and Miley and Noah Cyrus (“Star Sisters” will air on April 10); trail-blazing billionaires like Jay-Z (“Billionaires: Fierce, Fearless & Filthy Rich” will premiere this summer); and Hollywood’s most talked-about and mysterious cases including Whitney Houston‘s death (“Hollywood Mysteries” will premiere in the fall).

Selena’s husband Chris Perez and Grimmie’s brother Marcus will share intimate stories during the “Death of Innocence” special.

Season two of E! True Hollywood Story will debut on Monday, March 15 at 10:00 pm ET.

Lin-Manuel Miranda to Take Part in Virtual Birthday Fundraiser for Harry Belafonte

Lin-Manuel Miranda is helping celebrate a living legend…

The 41-year-old Puerto Rican actor, singer, songwriter, rapper, composer, director, producer, author and playwright will honor Harry Belafonte, who will turn 94 years old on March 1, during a virtual birthday concert.

Lin-Manuel Miranda

Miranda is among a cadre of friends and famous fans that will gather this Sunday for a virtual event that will feature performances, video tributes and testimonials by civil rights and racial justice leaders, politicians, artists, athletes and more. It will serve as a fundraiser for Belafonte’s Gathering for Justice organization and is sponsored in part by the Hope and Robert F. Smith family.

Belafonte founded the organization in 2005 after seeing a news story of a 5-year-old Black girl who was cuffed and arrested in her Florida classroom for “being unruly.” Since then, the organization’s mission is to build a movement to end child incarceration while working to eliminate racial inequities.

Titled The Gathering for Harry, the event will feature Common, Danny Glover, Alfre Woodard, Chuck D, Bernie and Jane Sanders, Stacey Abrams, Aloe Blacc, Tamika D. Mallory, Rev. Al Sharpton, Jackie Cruz, Aja Monet, Mysonne the General, Diane Nash, Carmen Perez-Jordan, DJ Carisma, Bryan Stevenson, Bernadette Peters, Christopher Jackson, Tony Shalhoub and more.

As of February 23, event organizers announced that Jay-Z was confirmed to appear to accept a Gatekeeper of Truth Award. Also new to the list are Tiffany Haddish, Usher, Miranda, Charlamagne Tha God, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Susan Sarandon, Pete Buttigieg and others.

The virtual party will be held Sunday, February 28, at 7:00 pm ET.

More information about how to take part in the event can be found here.

Zack de la Rocha & His Rage Against the Machine Band Mates Earn Third Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nomination

Zack de la Rocha is getting another chance to head to the Hall

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced its 2021 nominees, with the 51-year-old Mexican American musician, singer, songwriter, rapper and activist and his Rage Against the Machine band mates earning a spot on the ballot.

Zack de la Rocha x Rage Against the Machine

In the the most gender-inclusive ballot in the Rock Hall’s history, de la Rocha and his band mates are joined by Mary J. Blige, Kate Bush, Devo, Foo Fighters, The Go-Go’s, Iron Maiden, Jay-Z, Chaka Khan, Carole King, Fela Kuti, LL Cool J, New York Dolls, Todd Rundgren, Tina Turner and Dionne Warwick on the 2021 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ballot.

Formed in 1991, the group consists of vocalist  de la Rocha, bassist and backing vocalist Tim Commerford, guitarist Tom Morello, and drummer Brad Wilk.

The bands songs express revolutionary political views.

The band was nominated for induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in its first year of eligibility in 2017, as well as in 2018, although both bids failed. Could their third nomination be the charm?

Fan votes, which you can cast at RockHall.com, contribute to the induction process, but don’t guarantee entry.

In 2020, the Rock Hall inducted Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, the Notorious B.I.G., Whitney Houston, T. Rex and the Doobie Brothers into its ranks during a virtual ceremony due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jhene Aiko Releases 15-Minute Medley of Her Hits on Instagram

Jhene Aiko is welcoming you into her home in a special way…

The 32-year-old part-Spanish & part-Dominican American R&B singer & songwriter, a three-time Grammy nominee this year for her critically acclaimed album Chilombo, has shared a 15-minute medley on Instagram, kicking off the new year with a vibe-filled performance complete with violet lighting, cups of tea, a fire in the fireplace and even Tibetan singing bowls — you can practically smell the incense.

Jhené Aiko

Aiko also hosted an immersive sound bath live performance featuring a variety of color and aroma therapy, sound healing, conscience breathing, and guided meditation.

Over the years she’s collaborated with Big Sean, Childish Gambino, Rae Sremmurd, Kehlani, John Legend, Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Chris Brown, and Mila J.

Although she got her start as a teenager working with the pop group B2K, her proper career began in 2011 with the release of her first mixtape, Sailing Soul(s).

 

Later that year she signed with Kanye West/Jay-Z producer No I.D.’s ARTium label (via Def Jam), following with the Sail Out EP in 2013. Her major-label debut, Souled Out, garnered three Grammy noms, and she followed in 2017 with Trip.

The songs are from Chilombo and Souled Out.

Medley Track List:
“Triggered (freestyle)”
“Trigger Protection Mantra”
“W.A.Y.S.”
“Born Tired”
“Summer 2020”
“10K Hours”
“Magic Hour”

Christina Aguilera Signs with Roc Nation Management

Christina Aguilera is solid as a Roc…

The 39-year-old half-Ecuadorian American Grammy-winning singer has signed with Roc Nation management.

Christina Aguilera

Rumors of the switch sparked when fans noticed the singer’s name and bio on the Roc Nation management roster. Aguilera joins Alicia KeysDJ KhaledMariah CareyMegan Thee StallionMeek MillRihanna and more at the Jay-Z-founded agency.

Aguilera was previously managed by industry executive Irving Azoff, with whom she signed in 2000 after filing a breach of fiduciary duty lawsuit against her previous manager Steve Kurtz.

The pop singer’s most recent album, Liberation, debuted (and peaked) at No. 7 on the Billboard 200 albums chart in 2018. It was her seventh top 10 on the chart.

Accelerate,” which features Ty Dolla $ign and 2 Chainz, became her 10th No. 1 on the Dance Club Songs chart.

Swizz Beatz & Nas Release Cinematic Video for “Echo”

Swizz Beatz is echoing with art…

The 40-year-old half-Puerto Rican hip-hop rapper, DJ and record producer and  Nas have released the cinematic visual to their latest collaboration, “Echo,” after premiering the clip to a private audience earlier in the week.

Swizz Beatz & Nas

Swizz Beatz and Nas reconnected for the first time since 2012 with “Echo,” which served as one of the standout cuts on his Poison album.

To ensure that the “Echo” video would be a state-of-the-art affair and being the fine-art connoisseur that he is, Swizz Beatz brought Escobar all the way to the MORI Building Digital Art Museum in Japan to shoot the captivating visual.

The duo move through multiple fascinating exhibits within the museum, as Nas kicks off his bristling verse in a heavenly room filled with glittering lights gleaming down on him.

More collaborations between Nas and Swizz Beatz could be on the horizon outside of the shelved mythical track alongside Jay-Z and Jadakiss.

“I think Nas is in a good space,” Swizz Beatz told Billboard in October. “I’ve heard him now talk about music more than I ever did. It’s kind of hard to get him in the studio but he’s like, ‘Yo, send me this’ or ‘Yo, are you in?'”

Jessie Reyez Releases “Body Count” Remix, Featuring Normani and Kehlani

Jessie Reyez is upping her Body Count

The 27-year-old Colombian singerhas unveiled a star-studded remix of “Body Count” featuring Normani and Kehlani.

Jessie Reyez

The strummy sing-along to self-love finds Reyez among the company of women in no need of the companionship of a mediocre man. Normani flexes a silky double-time flow as she demands “some f-cking respect” and Kehlani — who continues her months-long winning streak of featured verses — sings about finding her self-love in the company of another woman.

Produced by legendary R&B hitmaker Babyface and the Rascals, the remix will feature on her sophomore EP Being Human In Public, which has already spawned “Apple Juice” and “Sola.”

Earlier this month, Reyez gave a debut performance at the MTV VMAs and made a cameo on the Calvin HarrisSam Smith jam “Promises.”

Reyez will be a fixture at music festivals nationwide during the summer, including this weekend’s Afropunk Festival in Brooklyn and Jay-Z‘s Made in America Festival over Labor Day weekend.

Being Human in Public is due out sometime this fall on FMLY/Island.

Bruno Mars Wins Six Grammys, Including Album, Record & Song of the Year

It’s a (24K) magical time for Bruno Mars

The 32-year-old part-Puerto Rican singer-songwriter was the big winner at Sunday night’s Grammy Awards, picking up six gramophones.

Bruno Mars

It was a clean sweep for Mars, who’d previously won five Grammys since 2011, including wins in the three major categories.

Mars took home his first Album of the Year award for his own work, his hit album 24K Magic, thereby denying rappers Kendrick Lamar and Jay-Z the honor of becoming the first hip-hop artist in 14 years to win the coveted album of the year.

Additionally, he took home the award for song of the year for his hit single “That’s What I Like,” and record of the year for “24K Magic.”

“Don’t cut me off Grammys, please,” said Mars from the stage while accepting the last award of the night. Recounting his early days as a young performer entertaining tourists in his native Hawaii, Mars name-checked writer-producers Babyface, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and Teddy Riley as key influences.

Shakira picked up the third Grammy of her career…

The 40-year-old Colombian superstar took home the award for Best Latin Pop Album for his critically acclaimed album El Dorado.

Residente picked up the first Grammy of his career as a solo artist.

The 39-year-old Puerto Rican rapper, who’d previously won two Grammys and a slew of Latin Grammys as a member of Calle 13, took home the award for Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album for his self-titled album.

Lin-Manuel Miranda picked up his third Grammy.

The 38-year-old composer, lyricist, playwright, and actor won the award for Best Song Written for Visual Media for his single from Disney’s Moana soundtrack, “How Far I’ll Go.”

Other Latino winners include Aida Cuevas for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) and Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta for Best Tropical Latin Album.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Album of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Record of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Song of the Year: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best New Artist: Alessia Cara

Best Pop Solo Performance: “Shape of You” — Ed Sheeran

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: “Feel It Still” — Portugal. The Man

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” — Various Artists; Dae Bennett, producer

Best Pop Vocal Album: “÷” — Ed Sheeran

Best Dance Recording: “Tonite” — LCD Soundsystem

Best Dance/Electronic Album: “3-D The Catalogue” — Kraftwerk

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Prototype” — Jeff Lorber Fusion

Best Rock Performance: “You Want It Darker” — Leonard Cohen

Best Metal Performance: “Sultan’s Curse” — Mastodon

Best Rock Song: “Run” — Foo Fighters, songwriters

Best Rock Album: “A Deeper Understanding” — The War on Drugs

Best Alternative Music Album: “Sleep Well Beast” — The National

Best R&B Performance: “That’s What I Like” — Bruno Mars

Best Traditional R&B Performance: “Redbone” — Childish Gambino

Best R&B Song: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best Urban Contemporary Album: “Starboy” — The Weeknd

Best R&B Album: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Best Rap Performance: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Rap/Sung Performance: “LOYALTY.” — Kendrick Lamar featuring Rihanna

Best Rap Song: “HUMBLE.” — K. Duckworth, Asheton Hogan and M. Williams II, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

Best Rap Album: “DAMN.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Country Solo Performance: “Either Way” — Chris Stapleton

Best Country Duo/Group Performance: “Better Man” — Little Big Town

Best Country Song: “Broken Halos” — Mike Henderson and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

Best Country Album: “From a Room: Volume 1” — Chris Stapleton

Best New Age Album: “Dancing on Water” — Peter Kater

Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Miles Beyond” — John McLaughlin, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album: “Dreams and Daggers” — Cécile McLorin Salvant

Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Rebirth” — Billy Childs

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Bringin’ It” — Christian McBride Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album: “Jazz Tango” — Pablo Ziegler Trio

Best Gospel Performance/Song: “Never Have to Be Alone” — CeCe Winans; Dwan Hill & Alvin Love III, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song: “What a Beautiful Name” — Hillsong Worship; Ben Fielding & Brooke Ligertwood, songwriters

Best Gospel Album: “Let Them Fall in Love” — CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: “Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams

Best Roots Gospel Album: “Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope” — Reba McEntire

Best Latin Pop Album: “El Dorado” — Shakira

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album: “Residente” — Residente

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano): “Arriero Somos Versiones Acústicas” — Aida Cuevas

Best Tropical Latin Album: “Salsa Big Band” — Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance: “Killer Diller Blues” — Alabama Shakes

Best American Roots Song: “If We Were Vampires” — Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit)

Best Americana Album: “The Nashville Sound” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Best Bluegrass Album: tie, “Laws of Gravity” — The Infamous Stringdusters and “All the Rage — In Concert Volume One” — Rhonda Vincent and the Rage

Best Traditional Blues Album: “Blue & Lonesome” — The Rolling Stones

Best Contemporary Blues Album: “TajMo” — Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’

Best Folk Album: “Mental Illness” — Aimee Mann

Best Regional Roots Music Album: “Kalenda” — Lost Bayou Ramblers

Best Reggae Album: “Stony Hill” — Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

Best World Music Album: “Shaka Zulu Revisited: 30th Anniversary Celebration” — Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Best Children’s Album: “Feel What U Feel” — Lisa Loeb

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling): “The Princess Diarist” — Carrie Fisher

Best Comedy Album: “The Age of Spin/Deep in the Heart of Texas” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album: “Dear Evan Hansen” — Ben Platt, principal soloist; Alex Lacamoire, Stacey Mindich, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, producers; Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, composers/lyricists (original Broadway cast recording)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Various Artists

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Justin Hurwitz, composer

Best Song Written for Visual Media: “How Far I’ll Go” — Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Auli’i Cravalho)

Best Instrumental Composition: “Three Revolutions” — Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: “Escapades for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra From ‘Catch Me If You Can’” — John Williams, arranger (John Williams)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals: “Putin” — Randy Newman, arranger (Randy Newman)

Best Recording Package: tie, “Pure Comedy (Deluxe Edition)” — Sasha Barr, Ed Steed and Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) and “El Orisha de la Rosa” — Claudio Roncoli and Cactus Taller, art directors (Magín Díaz)

Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package: “The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition” — Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly and David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Album Notes: “Live at the Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings” — Lynell George, writer (Otis Redding)

Best Historical Album: “Leonard Bernstein — The Composer” — Robert Russ, compilation producer; Martin Kistner and Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Leonard Bernstein)

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “24K Magic” — Serban Ghenea, John Hanes and Charles Moniz, engineers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer (Bruno Mars)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Greg Kurstin

Best Remixed Recording: “You Move (Latroit Remix)” — Dennis White, remixer (Depeche Mode)

Best Surround Sound Album: “Early Americans” — Jim Anderson, surround mix engineer; Darcy Proper, surround mastering engineer; Jim Anderson and Jane Ira Bloom, surround producers (Jane Ira Bloom)

Best Engineered Album, Classical: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Mark Donahue, engineer (Manfred Honeck and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Producer of the Year, Classical: David Frost

Best Orchestral Performance: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording: “Berg: Wozzeck” — Hans Graf, conductor; Anne Schwanewilms and Roman Trekel; Hans Graf and Brad Sayles, producers (Houston Symphony; Chorus of Students and Alumni, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University and Houston Grand Opera Children’s Chorus)

Best Choral Performance: “Bryars: The Fifth Century” — Donald Nally, conductor (PRISM Quartet and The Crossing)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance: “Death & the Maiden” — Patricia Kopatchinskaja and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Best Classical Instrumental Solo: “Transcendental” — Daniil Trifonov

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album: “Crazy Girl Crazy” — Barbara Hannigan (Ludwig Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium: “Higdon: All Things Majestic, Viola Concerto & Oboe Concerto” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition: “Viola Concerto” — Jennifer Higdon, composer (Roberto Díaz, Giancarlo Guerrero and Nashville Symphony)

Best Music Video: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Music Film: “The Defiant Ones” — Various Artists

Camila Cabello Pulls a Rare Double as She Earns First No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 with “Havana”

It’s a rare double for Camila Cabello

The 20-year-old Cuban and Mexican singer and former Fifth Harmony Member has reached the summit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (dated January 27) for the first time, as “Havana,” featuring Young Thug, rises from No. 2 to No. 1.

Camila Cabello

The song was released on SYCO/Epic Records and is the 1,070th No. 1 in the Hot 100‘s history, which dates to the chart’s August 4, 1958, inception.

Cabello’s Hot 100 coronation accompanies her No. 1 entrance on the Billboard 200 albums chart with her debut solo set, Camila.

Additionally, “Havana” becomes Cabello’s first No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart, jumping from No. 5 with a 34 percent gain to 44.9 million U.S. streams in the week ending January 18, according to Nielsen Music.

The track charges 4-2 on Digital Song Sales (which it led for two weeks), up 57 percent to 80,000 downloads sold in the week ending Jan. 18, aided by a 69-cent iTunes Store sale price. It claims the Hot 100’s top gains in both streaming and sales.

On Radio Songs (which it topped for four frames), “Havana” holds at No. 2, with 131 million in all-format airplay audience (down 5 percent) in the week ending Jan. 21.

Cabello had previously peaked as high as No. 4 on the Hot 100 both as a soloist and a member of vocal group Fifth Harmony, which she departed in December 2016. Her own “Bad Things,” with Machine Gun Kelly, hit No. 4 on February 11, 2017, while 5H‘s “Work From Home,” featuring Ty Dolla $ign, reached the same rank on June 11, 2016.

“Havana” spent seven (nonconsecutive) weeks at No. 2 before topping the Hot 100. That’s the most time for a song at the runner-up spot before hitting No. 1 since Justin Bieber‘s “Sorry” logged a record-tying eight weeks at No. 2 in 2015-16 prior to leading for three weeks beginning January 23, 2016.

“Havana” hits No. 1 in its 23rd week on the Hot 100, equaling the longest rise to the summit for a song by a female artist in the Hot 100’s history. It matches Sia‘s “Cheap Thrills,” featuring Sean Paul, in 2016, and Patti Austin‘s “Baby, Come to Me,” with James Ingram, in 1982-83.

Only six songs overall have taken more scenic routes to No. 1 than those three, led by Los Del Rio‘s “Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix)“: 33 weeks in 1995-96.

Beyonce was the last artist to earn both firsts as a soloist simultaneously, with “Crazy in Love,” featuring JAY-Z, and Dangerously in Love, on July 12, 2003. The song began an eight-week Hot 100 reign the same week that her first solo album apart from Destiny’s Child (and including “Crazy”) launched at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.

Still, Beyoncé had previously topped both charts as a member of Destiny’s Child.

Counting purely first weeks at No. 1 on the tallies overall, Cabello is the first artist to earn both firsts in the same week since Britney Spears, whose “…Baby One More Time” ascended to No. 1 on the Hot 100 dated Jan. 30, 1999, the week that her debut album of the same name opened atop the Billboard 200.

Meanwhile, Cabello is the first artist to top both the Hot 100 and Billboard 200 concurrently at all since Kendrick Lamar, who did so “Humble.” and DAMN., respectively, on May 6, 2017.

The last woman to double up at No. 1 on the charts before Cabello this week? Rihanna, with “Work,” featuring Drake, and ANTI, nearly two years ago (April 2, 2016).

Cardi B & Bruno Mars to Perform “Finesse (Remix)” at This Year’s Grammy Awards Show

Cardi B is ready to make her Grammys debut…

The 25-year-old part-Dominican rapper will partner with Bruno Mars to bring their “Finesse (Remix)” to the Grammy stage when the 60th Annual awards come back to New York City on Sunday January 28.

Cardi B & Bruno Mars

Along with Mars and Cardi B, the Recording Academy revealed that 2018 Grammy nominees Luis Fonsi & Daddy YankeeKesha, and SZA will also join the roster.

In addition, Alessia Cara, Khalid and Logic will join voices for a performance, taking the stage with a group of suicide attempt and loss survivors in a special performance of “1-800-273-8255.”

Previously announced performers include Childish Gambino, Lady Gaga, Little Big Town, Patti LuPone, P!nk, and Ben Platt.

Mars, who is the third most nominated artist of the night after JAY Z and Kendrick Lamar, has earned six nominations including album of the year and best R&B album for 24K Magic as well as record of the year for “24K Magic” and song of the year for “That’s What I Like.”

Cardi B, who will make her Grammy debut this year, received two nods for “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)” (best rap performance and best rap song).

Current three-time Grammy nominees Fonsi & Daddy Yankee are up for record of the year, song of the year, and best pop duo/group performance (“Despacito” featuring Justin Bieber) after winning big at the Latin Grammys back in November 2017.

The show will be hosted by award-winning television personality and performer James Corden and will be broadcasted live on CBS at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT.