Jessi Uribe Earns First No. 1 on Billboard’s Regional Mexican Airplay Chart with Luis R Conriquez-Collab “Si Ya Hiciste El Mal”

It’s a special first for Jessi Uribe

The 35-year-old Colombian singer has secured his first No. 1 on Billboard’Regional Mexican Airplay chart dated November 19 as “Si Ya Hiciste El Mal,” his first collaborative effort with Luis R Conriquez, rises 2-1.

Jessi UribeUribe is one of the forerunners of Colombian ranchero, a branch of regional Colombian music that borrows from Mexican mariachi, ranchera and corrido formats.

He becomes the second Colombian singer-songwriter to score a No. 1 on Regional Mexican Airplay in 2022: As “Si Ya Hiciste el Mal” hits No. 1, it sends Camilo, a core Latin pop Colombian artist, to No. 2 as “Alaska,” with Grupo Firme dips after its one-week command (chart dated November 12).

“Honestly, I’m extremely happy and grateful,” Uribe tells Billboard. “It’s a dream fulfilled. I have been a regional Mexican music lover since childhood, I am singer of regional Colombian music and to be the first one to achieve this, is an honor. Thanks to Luis, my team, and the listeners who have given us so much love.”

“Si Ya Hiciste el Mal” climbs from the runner-up spot after a 3% increase in audience impressions, to 7.1 million, earned in the U.S. in the week ending November 13, according to Luminate.

The song gives Uribe his first leader on an airplay chart. He previously scored a No. 6 best with “El Alumno,” with Joss Favela, in May. Meanwhile, Conriquez clocks his second ruler: “JGL,” with La Adictiva, topped Regional Mexican Airplay for one week (September 10).

“Working with Jessie was a beautiful experience,” Conriquez tells Billboard. “We traveled to Colombia to record the song and our bonding was beyond great.”

Further, thanks to its radio reception, “Si Ya Hiciste el Mal” debuts at No. 50 on the multimetric Hot Latin Songs chart. It earns Uribe his first chart appearance. Conriquez claims his ninth entry.

The track also makes progress on the all-genre Latin Airplay chart jumping 10-8, the closest Conriquez has been to the top after another No. 8 high (“JGL” in the Sept. 10-dated ranking).

Ángela Aguilar Teams Up with Yuridia for New Single “Qué Agonía”

Ángela Aguilar is agonizing

The 19-year-old Mexican-American singer has joined voices with Yuridia to release the new single “Qué Agonía.”

Ángela AguilarThe song is the fifth single from Yuridia’s newly released Regional Mexican album, Pa’ Luego Es Tarde, produced by Eden Muñoz.

The track and the album were released on Thursday, October 20.

With beautiful orchestration, and sublime harmonies from the two powerhouses, “Qué Agonía” — written by Aguilar — is a romantic Mexican ballad about being in love long after a breakup.

“The truth is, I didn’t forget you… and although a lot has happened, and life changed for us, the feeling is alive”, they sing.

In the official video, they appear accompanied by an all-female mariachi band, among other musicians.

Pablo Alborán Teams Up with Carin Leon to Release New Single “Viaje a Ningún Lado”

Pablo Alborán is dipping his toe into Regional Mexican music…

The 33-year-old Spanish musician and singer-songwriter has joined voices with Carin Leon to released the magical collaboration, “Viaje a Ningún Lado.”

Accompanied by a beautiful fusion of acoustic guitars, mariachi and flamenco melodies — and the deep power of interpretation of both singer-songwriters — the lyrics wrap around a story of a love that may have already left, and it’s time to let go.

“I rather you leave now before I start feeling alone with you, before I learn more about you from the things you don’t say, before doubts raise another wall between us,” they sing in the chorus.

The new single will form part of Alborán’s next album La Cuarta Hoja.

J Balvin Becomes First Latino Artist to Headline NFL Kickoff Concert

J Balvin has earned a place in NFL history…

The 37-year-old Colombian singer performed at Alamitos Beach in Long Beach, California, on Thursday, September 8 as part of the NFL Kickoff Experience to celebrate the beginning of the 2022 NFL season, becoming the first Latino artist to headline an NFL kickoff concert.

J BalvinJ Balvin performed ahead of the first game of the year, which saw the Buffalo Bills battle with reigning Super Bowl champs, the Los Angeles Rams.

Attendees defied the L.A. heat wave and made their way to the beach for a free day event that featured all sorts of activities and activations, including a beach football field.

Before Balvin took the stage, a local mariachi band serenaded the sweaty crowd before the Alabama State Marching Hornets took over for a riveting number.

Opening for Balvin was West Coast-based DJ and producer Tokimonsta, who was able to get the concertgoers out of the shade and closer to the main stage where they danced to her eclectic set.

Then, an inflatable giant hand appeared onstage holding up an equally large smiling face balloon — Balvin’s signature smiley face— which could only mean that the chart-topping artist was ready to take make his grand entrance. While his set was scheduled to begin at 4:00 pm, Balvin took the stage 10 minutes earlier to perform a nearly one-hour show.

He appeared in a two-piece, army-like outfit styled with a matching balaclava that only exposed his eyes.

“Cómo está la vibra esta tarde, how’s the vibe today?” he asked the crowd.

Balvin kicked off with the fan-favorite “Mi Gente” and went on to perform back-to-back hits like “Reggaeton,” “Nivel de Perreo,” “Con Altura,” “Loco Contigo,” “Blanco,” “Ritmo,” “Amarillo,” “Ginza,” “I Like It” and “In Da Getto.” He also brought out a special guest, Trueno, an emerging rapper from Argentina, to perform their collaboration “Un Paso.”

“My name is Jose but they call me J Balvin,” he added. “Where are all the warriors that fight for their dreams? I see my Latino gang representing here.”

Throughout the years, artists like Shawn MendesMeek MillMeghan Trainor and Ed Sheeran have performed at the NFL Kickoff Concert.

Lupita Infante Releases Two Versions of New Single “Pa’ Dentro”

Lupita Infante is the toast of the town…

The 35-year-old Mexican American singer has released the new single “Pa’ Dentro” via Sony Music Latin.

Lupita InfanteAnd, the new track comes in two different versions: mariachi and banda.

“Pa’ Dentro” expresses a single message — “tequila is your best friend” — with the banda version a true party starter.

“Pa’ Adentro” was penned by Infante and renowned Regional Mexican singer-songwriter Erika Vidrio.

“‘Pa’ Dentro’ is a song that was missing in my repertoire, a song that would allow me to toast with the public, and a jovial song that you can listen to with friends,” Infante says about the track. “It is a tribute to Mexican culture and our passion for tequila, things that always go hand in hand.”

The track is a preview of Infante’s upcoming EP.

Gigi Saul Guerrero to Direct Biopic About the Late Jenni Rivera

Gigi Saul Guerrero is bringing a Mexican American icon’s life story to the big screen…

The 32-year-old Mexican Canadian filmmaker and actress will direct “Jenni,” a film about the life of the late Jenni Rivera.

Gigi Saul Guerrero The biopic, which is authorized by the late artist’s estate, will be produced by Los Angeles-based multimedia company Mucho Mas Media and De Line Pictures.

Developed by Guerrero and screenwriter Shane McKenzie, the movie follows Rivera’s rise as a Spanish singer who successfully crossed over to U.S. and global audiences, as well as her work as a women’s rights activist. She died in a plane crash in 2012 at age 43.

Rivera’s variety of banda, mariachi and norteño music made her one of the best-selling regional Mexican artists ever, with 15 gold and platinum records and top-drawing tours.

She produced multiple television series like “Chiquis & Raq-C” and “I Love Jenni,” and in 2012 she was named one of the top 25 most powerful women by People en Español. She also established charities like the Jenni Rivera Love Foundation, which supports single mothers and children who have been victims of domestic abuse.

Jenni will premiere on TelevisaUnivision’s premium streaming tier VIX+ and in select theaters throughout the U.S. and Mexico. A release date has not been announced yet.

Saul Guerrero was named by Variety in 2019 as a Latinx talent to watch. Since then, she signed a first-look deal with Blumhouse Productions after the debut of her first movie, Culture Shock.

On the acting front, she has voiced characters in “Supernatural Academy” and “Angry Birds: Summer Madness.”

Gurrero also created and directed the 2017 web horror series La Quinceañera and short film El Gigante, and she co-founded the Latin genre-focused company LuchaGore Productions.

McKenzie, a frequent collaborator of Saul Guerrero’s at LuchaGore Productions, wrote the screenplays for “El Gigante,” “La Quinceanera” and “Bingo Hell.”

Jenni Rivera Enterprises will executive produce.

“Gigi is so confident in her voice and storytelling and has an innate understanding of Jenni’s life.

Ricky Martin’s “Livin’ La Vida Loca” Among Recordings Being Preserved as Part of Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry

Ricky Martin’s breakthrough single will be livin’ for eternity…

The 50-year-old Puerto Rican superstar’s “Livin’ La Vida Loca” will be preserved as part of the Library of CongressNational Recording Registry.

Ricky MartinMartin’s hit single, released in 1999 as part of the former Menudo singer’s English-language debut album, is part of the 2022 list of additions to the registry. 

“Livin’ La Vida Loca” reached No. 1 in more than 20 countries, and it’s considered one of Martin’s biggest hits and best-selling singles of all time.

In the United States, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for five consecutive weeks, becoming Martin’s first number one single on the chart. Additionally, it broke several records on Billboard charts.

At the 1999 MTV Video Music Awards, it won a total of five awards and was nominated for several other categories, including Video of the Year, making Martin the first Latin artist in history to receive a nomination in this category.

Linda Ronstadt’s Spanish-language album Canciones de Mi Padre is also being preserved.

Released in 1987, it was the 75-year-old half-Mexican American Grammy-winning singer’s first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. The canciones were a big part of Ronstadt’s family tradition and musical roots.

At 2.5 million copies sold in the US, the album stands as one of the biggest selling non-English language albums in American record history. It has been RIAA certified double-platinum (for over 2 million US copies sold) and also won Ronstadt the Grammy for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album.

The Buena Vista Social Club’s self-titled album has also been earmarked for preservation.

The ensemble of Cuban musicians, established in 1996, recorded the album in March 1996 and released it in September 1997. It quickly became an international success, which prompted the ensemble to perform with a full line-up in Amsterdam and New York in 1998. German director Wim Wenders captured the performance on film for a documentary—also called Buena Vista Social Club—that included interviews with the musicians conducted in Havana. Wenders’ film was released in June 1999 to critical acclaim, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary feature and winning numerous accolades including Best Documentary at the European Film Awards.

The Library of Congress said its National Recording Preservation Plan provides a blueprint to implement a comprehensive national sound recording preservation program. The National Recording Preservation Board and members of the public have nominated recordings to the National Recording Registry every year since 2002. The depth and breadth of nominations received highlights the richness of the nations” audio legacy and underscores the importance of assuring the long-term preservation of that legacy for future generations.

Here’s the list of 2022 additions to the National Recordings Registry, in chronological order:

“Harlem Strut”, James P. Johnson (1921)
Franklin D. Roosevelt: Complete Presidential Speeches (1933-45)
“Walking the Floor Over You”, Ernest Tubb (1941, single)
“On a Note of Triumph” (May 8, 1945)
“Jesus Gave Me Water”, The Soul Stirrers (1950, single)
“Ellington at Newport”, Duke Ellington (1956, album)
“We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite”, Max Roach (1960, album)
“The Christmas Song”, Nat King Cole (1961, single)
“Tonight’s the Night”, The Shirelles (1961, album)
“Moon River”, Andy Williams (1962, single)
“In C”, Terry Riley (1968, album)
“It’s a Small World”, The Disneyland Boys Choir (1964, single)
“Reach Out, I’ll Be There”, The Four Tops (1966, single)
Hank Aaron’s 715th Career Home Run (April 8, 1974)
“Bohemian Rhapsody”, Queen (1975, single)
“Don’t Stop Believin’”, Journey (1981, single)
“Canciones de Mi Padre”, Linda Ronstadt (1987, album)
“Nick of Time”, Bonnie Raitt (1989, album)
“The Low End Theory”, A Tribe Called Quest (1991, album)
“Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)”, Wu-Tang Clan (1993, album)
“Buena Vista Social Club” (1997, album)
“Livin’ La Vida Loca”, Ricky Martin (1999, single)
“Songs in A Minor”, Alicia Keys (2001, album)
WNYC broadcasts for the day of 9/11 (Sept. 11, 2001)
“WTF with Marc Maron” (Guest: Robin Williams, 2010)

Tucson Music Hall to Be Renamed in Honor of Linda Ronstadt

Linda Ronstadt is receiving a special hometown honor…

The Tucson Music Hall will be renamed in honor of the 75-year-old half-Mexican American retired singer, a southern Arizona native who went on to become a Grammy-winning superstar, as announced by Mayor Regina Romero.

Linda RonstadtOne of the top performers of the 1970s and a popular singer well into the 21st century, Ronstadt collected nearly a dozen Grammys in several categories, including country, pop, Latin and children’s music.

She stopped singing in 2009 when Parkinson’s disease robbed her of her singing voice.

“Linda Ronstadt is a beloved daughter of Tucson. It is time to honor her legacy and her ability to tell the story of our culture through music,” Romero said in a statement.

Ronstadt arrived on the music scene in 1967 as the lead singer of the Stone Poneys, a country-folk trio that featured two of her friends from the University of Arizona in Tucson. She later found success as a solo artist in eclectic genres ranging from rock to Mexican ranchera.

She was influenced by the Mexican music she grew up listening to as a child in Tucson.

“To me, nothing is more satisfying than going home to Tucson and singing with my dad,” Ronstadt once told The Los Angeles Times.

The venue will be formally renamed on May 7 during the International Mariachi Conference Espectacular Concert. Romero’s office said Ronstadt is scheduled to be in Tucson to unveil new signage bearing her name.

“I am fortunate to be a member of a large musical family that has been associated with the City of Tucson since the 1800s,” Ronstadt said in a statement released by the city. “My entire career was informed and nurtured by the music we made as I was growing up here.”

Adriel Favela Releases Sixth Studio Album “Cosas Del Diablo”

It’s a devilish time for Adriel Favela.

The 29-year-old Mexican American Regional Mexican artist has released his sixth studio album Cosas Del Diablo.

Adriel Favela

It’s Favela’s first album under his recording and production deal with Fonovisa Records, owned by Universal Music Latino.

El Bo,” an infectious corrido-meets-norteño fusion with Sonora-based artist El Bala, was the first single off the album, his first LP release in four years.

On “Oveja Negra,” Favela pens honest and raw lyrics, attesting “I’m no Saint, I don’t like to play, and even though I’m not a bad person, I’m the Devil’s son.”

Corridos and melodious requintos have characterized Favela’s career throughout the years, but in Cosas del Diablo, he also includes catchy Banda tunes “Ray02” and “Bayo 17” with Luis R. Conriquez, and flaunts his vulnerability in heartfelt songs “Lagrimas de Miel” and “Lunes.”

“Corridos do not necessarily talk about negative things, on the contrary,” Favela previously said to Billboard. “My songs are corridos that talk about people’s battles and who have grown as a person.”

Prior to releasing his 15-track set, Favela dropped his Carin Leon-assisted single “Con Un Botecito A Pecho,” a country-tinged mariachi anthem for those who are finally getting over a breakup.

In the track, both artists sing about going out and drinking because they are happy and convinced that they will not get back with their ex.

Bad Bunny Wins Six Premio Lo Nuestro Awards, Including Artist of the Year

Bad Bunny is celebrating a big night…

The 27-year-old Puerto Rican Grammy-winning rapper proved to be the big winner at this year’s Premio Lo Nuestro.

Bad BunnyBad Bunny, who wasn’t present at the awards show, won six trophies, including artist of the year, album of the year for El Último Tour Del Mundo, and The Perfect Mix of the Year for “Volví,” his collaboration with Aventura.

The “Yo Perreo Sola” singer was followed by Calibre 50, Camilo, CNCO, Grupo Firme, Karol G, and J Balvin with three wins each.

Winners for Premio Lo Nuestro, which aired live on Univision, are selected by fans, who choose from a list of finalists provided by the network.

Special awards were given to Paulina Rubio (“Premio a la Trayectoria”), Maluma (“Ídolo Global”) and Farruko (“Premio Lo Nuestro a la Excelencia Urbana”).

Maluma made an appearance with a message of optimism for Colombia, delivered alongside buddies Blssd, and Kapla y Miky, who all wore t-shirts that said “Medallo en el mapa. +Música, – violencia

But the evening’s show-stopper was Farruko, who recently announced his embracement of Christianity and performed an emotional medley with fellow believers Pedro Capó and O’Neill, backed by a string orchestra and gospel choir and with motivational speaker Daniel Habif augmenting the message.

It was Habif who introduced Farruko’s four children onstage to give their dad his award. Tears flowed from everyone onstage as Farruko said: “The glory I give to God. Love your fellow man, love your enemy, forgive, be forgiven and have compassion others.”

Calibre 50 won Regional Mexican norteña and Mariachi song of the year, while Camilo won artist of the year, pop and pop/ballad and tropical song of the year. CNCO won pop song, album and group of the year while Grupo Firme took home Regional Mexican group of the year, Banda song of the year and Regional Mexican album of the year. J Balvin won crossover collaboration of the year, urban collaboration of the year and pop/urban song of the year.

And Karol G won song of the year, urban song of the year and urban female artist of the year.

Here’s a look at all the winners:

General

Lo Nuestro Award Artist of the Year: Bad Bunny
Album of the Year: “El Último Tour Del Mundo”, Bad Bunny
Song of the Year: “Bichota”, Karol G
Female Revelation Artist: Ángela Aguilar
Male Revelation Artist: El Alfa
Remix of the Year:Ayer Me Llamó Mi Ex (Remix)”, Khea, Natti Natasha and Prince Royce with Lenny Santos
Crossover Collaboration of the Year: “In Da Getto”, J Balvin and Skrillex
The Perfect Mix of the Year: “Volví”, Aventura and Bad Bunny
DJ of the Year: DJ Adoni

Pop

Solo Artist of the Year – Pop: Camilo
Song of the Year – Pop: “Tan Enamorados”, CNCO
Collaboration of the Year – Pop: “Pareja del Año”, Sebastián Yatra and Myke Towers
Song of the Year – Pop/Urban: “Qué Más Pues?, J Balvin and María Becerra
Song of the Year – Pop-Urban/Dance: “Pepas”, Farruko.
Song of the Year – Pop/Ballad: “Amén”, Ricardo Montaner, Mau y Ricky, Camilo and Evaluna Montaner
Group or Duo of the Year – Pop: CNCO
Album of the Year – Pop: “Déjà vu”, CNCO

Urban

Male Artist of the Year – Urban: Bad Bunny
Female Artist of the Year – Urban: Karol G
Song of the Year – Urban: “Bichota”, Karol G
Collaboration of the Year – Urban: “AM Remix”, Nio García, J Balvin and Bad Bunny
Album of the Year – Urban: “El Último Tour Del Mundo”, Bad Bunny

Regional Mexican

Artist of the Year – Regional Mexican: Christian Nodal
Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “A la antigüita”, Calibre 50
Collaboration of the Year – Regional Mexican: “Botella Tras Botella”, Gera MX and Christian Nodal
Group or Duo of the Year – Mexican Regional: Grupo Firme.
Norteño Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “Te Volvería A Elegir”, Calibre 50
Band Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “El Toxico”, Grupo Firme and Carin León
Mariachi/Ranchera Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “100 Años”, Carlos Rivera, Maluma and Caliber 50
Sierreña Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “Ya Me Enteré”, Chayín Rubio
Cumbia Song of the Year – Regional Mexican: “Cumbia a la gente”, Guaynaa and Los Ángeles Azules
Album of the Year – Regional Mexican: “Nos Divertimos Logrando Lo Imposible”, Grupo Firme

Tropical

Artist of the Year – Tropical: Romeo Santos
Song of the Year – Tropical: “Bebé”, Camilo and El Alfa
Collaboration of the Year – Tropical: “De Vuelta Pa’ La Vuelta”, Daddy Yankee and Marc Anthony.

Misc.

Lo Nuestro Award for Lifetime Achievement: Paulina Rubio
Global Idol Award: Maluma
Urban Excellence Award: Farruko

The winners were chosen by fan voting on the website.