Mariah Carey Among 2024 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Nominees

Mariah Carey has made a rockin’ list…

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation has revealed the nominees for the 2024 induction, with the 54-year-old half-Venezuelan American Grammy-winning singer making the list.

Mariah CareyReferred to as the “Songbird Supreme” by Guinness World Records, she’s regarded as one of the greatest singers in the history of music. She’s noted for her songwriting, five-octave vocal range, melismatic singing style and signature use of the whistle register.

Carey is one of the best-selling music artists, with over 220 million records sold worldwide. She’s an inductee of the Songwriters Hall of Fame, the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress and the Long Island Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame.

She holds the record for the most Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles by a solo artist (19), a female songwriter (18), and a female producer (15), spending a record 93 weeks atop the chart.

To be eligible for nomination, an individual artist or band must have released its first commercial recording at least 25 years prior to the year of nomination.

Ten out of 15 of the 2024 nominees are on the ballot for the first time, including Carey, Cher, Foreigner, Peter Frampton, Kool & the Gang, Lenny Kravitz, Oasis, Sinéad O’Connor, Ozzy Osbourne and Sade.

The rest are Mary J. Blige, Dave Matthews Band, Eric B. & Rakim, Jane’s Addiction (including guitarist Dave Navarro) and A Tribe Called Quest.

“This remarkable list of nominees reflects the diverse artists and music that the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame honors and celebrates,” said John Sykes, chairman of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation. “Continuing in the true spirit of Rock & Roll, these artists have created their own sounds that have impacted generations and influenced countless others that have followed in their footsteps.”

The 2024 ceremony will once again stream live on Disney+ with a special airing on ABC at a later date and available on Hulu the next day. The 2023 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony streamed live on Disney+ for the first time ever; the special on ABC reached over 13 million viewers across linear and streaming, and ABC’s New Year’s Day telecast was the No. 1 entertainment choice among Adults 18-49.

Nominee ballots will be sent to an international voting body of more than 1,000 artists, historians and members of the music industry. An artist’s musical impact and influence on other artists, length and depth of career and body of work as well as innovation and superiority in style and technique are taken into consideration.

Inductees will be announced in late April. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 2024 Induction Ceremony will take place in Cleveland this fall.

Congressman Joaquin Castro Launches National Call for Latino Films to Nominate for National Film Library

U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro is working to get more Latino films preserved…

The 48-year-old Mexican American politician, who has represented Texas’s 20th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2013, has teamed up with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to launch a nationwide call for Latino films to nominate for the National Film Registry.

Joaquin CastroThe U.S.’s preeminent archive of films with cultural, historic or aesthetic significance is essential in preserving cinema. Every year, the Librarian of Congress adds 25 new movies to the registry after reviewing titles nominated by the public and conferring with National Film Preservation Board members and Library film curators.

As of 2023, there are 24 Latino films on the National Film Registry, less than three percent of the 850 movies in the registry.

“Since the earliest days of cinema, Latino actors, writers, directors, and creatives have made extraordinary contributions to American filmmaking,” said Congressman Castro. “As the Library of Congress works to preserve the films that shaped American culture, public nominations will put a spotlight on the Latino-driven films that have sold out theaters and defined generations. As we launch this year’s push for inclusion, I look forward to hearing from folks across America about the Latino films that have made an enduring impact on their lives.”

Most recently, the NFR added: “Cyrano de Bergerac” (1950), starring Puerto Rican actor José Ferrer, the first Latino ever to win an acting Oscar, and “The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez” (1982) with Edward James Olmos. Other notable inclusions are “West Side Story” (1961), “La Bamba” (1987), “Selena” (1997) and “Real Women Have Curves” (2002).

To be eligible, films must be at least 10 years old. To qualify for nominations to the Library of Congress, submissions must be received by August 3.

Some titles the Library of Congress might consider include Guillermo del Toro’s adult-fantasy drama Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), Peter Sollet’s independent New York film Raising Victor Vargas (2002) and Alfonso Cuarón’s coming-of-age masterpiece Y tu mamá también (2002).

Suggestions may be submitted at Congressman Castro’s website.

Daddy Yankee to Executive Produce & Appear in Netflix’s Reggaeton-Themed Series “Neon”

It’s an electric time for Daddy Yankee

The 46-year-old Puerto Rican reggaeton superstar is set to executive produce the upcoming Netflix series Neon.

Daddy YankeeDaddy Yankee, a pioneer of the reggaeton genre popularized in his native Puerto Rico, will also make a cameo appearance.

Across 8 episodes, Neon follows three friends who move from a small town in Florida to Miami, hoping to make it big in the world of reggaeton. The show chronicles their larger-than-life dreams and the harsh comic realities of attempting to make it in the music industry.

Tyler Dean Flores plays Santi, a budding reggaeton artist who, with the help of his friends, Ness (Emma Ferrerira) and Felix (Jordan Mendoza) and A&R rep, Mia (Courtney Taylor) hopes to become the biggest reggaeton star in the world—or at least make rent.

Shea Serrano created Neon and Max Searle is the showrunner. In addition to Serrano and Daddy Yankee, executive producers include Searle alongside Scooter Braun, James Shin and Scott Manson for SB Projects and Anne Clements. Kyle Vinuya and Demi Adejuyigbe co-executive produce. Jordan Mendoza serves as consulting producer.

Daddy Yankee, the multi-hyphenate born Ramón Luis Ayala Rodríguez, recently announced his retirement as a performer following a successful three-decades-long career with his final shows set from November 30 to December 3 in Puerto Rico. The 5-time Latin Grammy Award winner’s biggest hit Gasolina, recently became the first reggaeton song to be inducted into the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress.

Daddy Yankee previously executive produced and starred in the film Talento de Barrio (2008) from director José Iván Santiago.

Although he has yet to announce his plans for the future, he remains dedicated to his non-profit Daddy’s House via his Corazon Guerrero Foundation.

Ricky Martin’s “Livin’ La Vida Loca” Among Recordings Being Preserved as Part of Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry

Ricky Martin’s breakthrough single will be livin’ for eternity…

The 50-year-old Puerto Rican superstar’s “Livin’ La Vida Loca” will be preserved as part of the Library of CongressNational Recording Registry.

Ricky MartinMartin’s hit single, released in 1999 as part of the former Menudo singer’s English-language debut album, is part of the 2022 list of additions to the registry. 

“Livin’ La Vida Loca” reached No. 1 in more than 20 countries, and it’s considered one of Martin’s biggest hits and best-selling singles of all time.

In the United States, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for five consecutive weeks, becoming Martin’s first number one single on the chart. Additionally, it broke several records on Billboard charts.

At the 1999 MTV Video Music Awards, it won a total of five awards and was nominated for several other categories, including Video of the Year, making Martin the first Latin artist in history to receive a nomination in this category.

Linda Ronstadt’s Spanish-language album Canciones de Mi Padre is also being preserved.

Released in 1987, it was the 75-year-old half-Mexican American Grammy-winning singer’s first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. The canciones were a big part of Ronstadt’s family tradition and musical roots.

At 2.5 million copies sold in the US, the album stands as one of the biggest selling non-English language albums in American record history. It has been RIAA certified double-platinum (for over 2 million US copies sold) and also won Ronstadt the Grammy for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album.

The Buena Vista Social Club’s self-titled album has also been earmarked for preservation.

The ensemble of Cuban musicians, established in 1996, recorded the album in March 1996 and released it in September 1997. It quickly became an international success, which prompted the ensemble to perform with a full line-up in Amsterdam and New York in 1998. German director Wim Wenders captured the performance on film for a documentary—also called Buena Vista Social Club—that included interviews with the musicians conducted in Havana. Wenders’ film was released in June 1999 to critical acclaim, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary feature and winning numerous accolades including Best Documentary at the European Film Awards.

The Library of Congress said its National Recording Preservation Plan provides a blueprint to implement a comprehensive national sound recording preservation program. The National Recording Preservation Board and members of the public have nominated recordings to the National Recording Registry every year since 2002. The depth and breadth of nominations received highlights the richness of the nations” audio legacy and underscores the importance of assuring the long-term preservation of that legacy for future generations.

Here’s the list of 2022 additions to the National Recordings Registry, in chronological order:

“Harlem Strut”, James P. Johnson (1921)
Franklin D. Roosevelt: Complete Presidential Speeches (1933-45)
“Walking the Floor Over You”, Ernest Tubb (1941, single)
“On a Note of Triumph” (May 8, 1945)
“Jesus Gave Me Water”, The Soul Stirrers (1950, single)
“Ellington at Newport”, Duke Ellington (1956, album)
“We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite”, Max Roach (1960, album)
“The Christmas Song”, Nat King Cole (1961, single)
“Tonight’s the Night”, The Shirelles (1961, album)
“Moon River”, Andy Williams (1962, single)
“In C”, Terry Riley (1968, album)
“It’s a Small World”, The Disneyland Boys Choir (1964, single)
“Reach Out, I’ll Be There”, The Four Tops (1966, single)
Hank Aaron’s 715th Career Home Run (April 8, 1974)
“Bohemian Rhapsody”, Queen (1975, single)
“Don’t Stop Believin’”, Journey (1981, single)
“Canciones de Mi Padre”, Linda Ronstadt (1987, album)
“Nick of Time”, Bonnie Raitt (1989, album)
“The Low End Theory”, A Tribe Called Quest (1991, album)
“Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)”, Wu-Tang Clan (1993, album)
“Buena Vista Social Club” (1997, album)
“Livin’ La Vida Loca”, Ricky Martin (1999, single)
“Songs in A Minor”, Alicia Keys (2001, album)
WNYC broadcasts for the day of 9/11 (Sept. 11, 2001)
“WTF with Marc Maron” (Guest: Robin Williams, 2010)

Library of Congress Adds “Buena Vista Social Club” Documentary to National Film Registry

The story of the Buena Vista Social Club’s effort to revive the music of pre-revolutionary Cuba is being celebrated.

The Library of Congress has unveiled its annual list of 25 movies to make the cut for the National Film Registry, with the documentary named after the ensemble of Cuban musicians, Buena Vista Social Club, making the cut.

Buena Vista Social Club

The Buena Vista Social Club project was organized by World Circuit executive Nick Gold, produced by American guitarist Ry Cooder and directed by Juan de Marcos González. They named the group after the homonymous members’ club in the Buenavista quarter of Havana, a popular music venue in the 1940s. To showcase the popular styles of the time, such as sonbolero and danzón, they recruited a dozen veteran musicians, many of whom had been retired for many years.

Wim Wenders captured the performance on film for a documentary that included interviews with the musicians conducted in Havana. The film was released in June 1999 to critical acclaim, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary feature and winning numerous accolades including Best Documentary at the European Film Awards.

Lourdes Portillo’s The Devil Never Sleeps is part of a record number of films directed by women that make the list this year.

The 76-year-old Mexican film director’s mystery/documentary centers on Oscar, who is found dead from a gunshot wound. His wife believes he committed suicide. But his nephew, Portillo, suspects that it was murder and investigates the death with no help from the authorities.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said, “With the inclusion of diverse filmmakers, we are not trying to set records but rather to set the record straight by spotlighting the astonishing contributions women and people of color have made to American cinema, despite facing often-overwhelming hurdles.”

This year’s list brings the number of films selected for preservation in the registry to 800.

Turner Classic Movies will host a television special from 8:00 pm ET on December. 15 to screen a selection of motion pictures named to the registry. Among the films to air are The Battle of the Century, Lilies of the Field, Illusions, The Joy Luck Club, Cabin in the Sky and The Man with the Golden Arm.

Here’s the full rundown of this year’s additions:

The Battle Of The Century (1927)
The Blues Brothers (1980)
Bread (1918)
Buena Vista Social Club (1999)
Cabin In The Sky (1943)
A Clockwork Orange (1971)
The Dark Knight (2008)
The Devil Never Sleeps (1994)
Freedom Riders (2010)
Grease (1978)
The Ground (1993-2001)
The Hurt Locker (2008)
Illusions (1982)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
Kid Auto Races At Venice (1914)
Lilies Of The Field (1963)
Losing Ground (1982)
The Man With the Golden Arm (1955)
Mauna Kea: Temple Under Siege (2006)
Outrage (1950)
Shrek (2001)
Suspense (1913)
Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971)
Wattstax (1973)
With Car And Camera Around The World (1929)

Amazon Studios Orders Priscilla Delgado’s “A League of Their Own” Series

Priscilla Delgado is ready to play ball…

Amazon Studios has picked up to series to A League of Their Own, a reimagining of Penny Marshall’s 1992 film, starring the 18-year-old Puerto Rican actress.

Priscilla Delgado

Hailing from co-creators Abbi Jacobson — who also stars —Will Graham and Sony Pictures Television, the hourlong series is described as a fresh approach to Marshall’s classic about the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

The series will follow new characters who embody the spirit of a generation of women who dreamed to play professional baseball. 

“The show takes a deeper look at race and sexuality, following the journey of a whole new ensemble of characters as they carve their own paths towards the field, both in the league and outside of it,” according to the streamer.

“28 years ago, Penny Marshall told us a story about women playing professional baseball that up until then had been largely overlooked. We grew up obsessed with the film, like everyone else. Three years ago, we approached Sony with the idea of telling a new, still overlooked set of those stories. With the help of an enormously talented team of collaborators, an amazing cast, and the devoted support of Amazon to this project, we feel beyond lucky and excited to get to bring these characters to life.” said Graham and Jacobson. “It took grit, fire, authenticity, wild imagination and a crackling sense of humor for these players to achieve their dreams. We’re hoping to bring audiences a story with all of those qualities.”

In addition to Delgado and Jacobson, A League Of Their Own also stars Chanté AdamsD’Arcy CardenGbemisola IkumeloKelly McCormack, and 34-year-old Argentine-Honduran actress from Mexico Roberta Colindrez, with recurring guest stars Molly EphraimKate Berlant and Melanie Field.

“There’s no crying in baseball, or at Prime Video,” said Vernon Sanders, Co-Head of Television at Amazon Studios. “Will and Abbi have taken a classic movie, reimagining it for a new generation with new characters and their own fresh, modern vision on a timeless story of big dreams, friendship, love, and, of course, baseball. We’re so excited to partner with Sony to bring this emotional, exciting new series to our Prime Video customers around the world.”

A League of Their Own
 hails from Amazon Studios and Sony Pictures Television in association with Field Trip Productions

The feature, directed by Marshall and scripted by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel from a story by Kelly Candaele and Kim Wilson, grossed $132 million worldwide. In 2012, the Library of Congress selected the film for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry.

“Abbi and Will have done a masterful job of reimagining this timeless classic. We are very thankful to our partners at Amazon for bringing this incredibly relevant and important story to audiences around the globe,” said Jeff Frost, President of Sony Pictures Television.

Delgado’s previous credits include Justo antes de Cristo and Desaparecidos, as well as Pedro Almodovar’s drama Julieta.

Colindrez’s previous credits include appearances on Starz’s Vida, Hulu’s Mrs. America, and Amazon’s I Love Dick.

Library of Congress Adds Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” to National Film Registry

One of Patricia Cardoso’s most iconic films is being celebrated in a special way… 

The Library of Congress has unveiled its annual selection of 25 films added to the National Film Registry, with the Colombian filmmaker’s Humanitas Prize-winning film Real Women Have Curves—a landmark of Latinx cinema—among the chosen.

Patricia Cardoso

Real Women Have Curves is one of an unprecedented seven titles directed by women, the most in a single year since the inaugural registry in 1989. 

Real Women Have Curves

The comedy-drama—released in 2002—starred America FerreraLupe Ontiveros and George Lopez. It’s the story of a first generation Mexican-American girl (Ferrera) and her passage to womanhood. Although she wants to go away to college, she must battle against the views of her parents, who think she should stay at home and provide for the family. As a compromise, she works with her mother (Ontiveros) in a sewing factory over the summer and learns some important lessons about life, helping her make a decision about her future.

It’s based on the play of the same name by Josefina López, who co-authored the screenplay for the film with George LaVoo. The film gained fame after winning the Audience Award for best dramatic film, and the Special Jury Prizefor acting at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival. According to the Sundance Institute, the film gives a voice to young women who are struggling to love themselves and find respect in the United States.

But it’s not the only LatinX film selected this year…

Zoot Suit, directed by Luis Valdez, made the list. 

Starring Daniel Valdez and Edward James Olmos, Zoot Suitis the1981 film adaptation of the Broadway play of the same name. It weaves a story involving the real-life events of the Sleepy Lagoon murder trial — when a group of young Mexican-Americans were charged with murder — resulting in the racially fueled Zoot Suit Riotsthroughout Los Angeles.

The film was nominated for the 1982 Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy.

Meanwhile, some of the selected films feature Hispanic artists…

Purple Rainstars Mexican American actress/singer Apollonia Kotero; and Platoonstars part-Spanish American actor Charlie Sheen,  

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced the annual selections, which were chosen based on cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage and guarantees the film will be preserved under the National Film Preservation Act. The films must be at least 10 years old.

“The National Film Registry has become an important record of American history, culture and creativity,” said Hayden. “Unlike many other honors, the registry is not restricted to a time, place or genre. It encompasses 130 years of the full American cinematic experience — a virtual Olympiad of motion pictures. With the support of Congress, the studios and other archives, we are ensuring that the nation’s cinematic history will be around for generations to come.” 

The 2019 selection brings the number of films in the registry to 775 and spans a century of filmmaking, from 1903 to 2003. 

Jacqueline Stewart, chair of the National Film Preservation Board’s task force on diversity, equity and inclusion, commented, “With this year’s National Film Registry selections, Dr, Hayden recognizes the importance of amplifying cinematic voices and stories that have been marginalized for far too long. I look forward to continuing research and dialogue with the Librarian, board members, film communities and the American public to ensure that the registry reflects the full spectrum of our society.”

Here’s the full list of this year’s selections:

Amadeus (1984)
Becky Sharp (1935)      
Before Stonewall (1984)
BodyAnd Soul (1925)
Boys Don’t Cry (1999)
Clerks (1994)
Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980)
Emigrants Landing At Ellis Island (1903)
Employees Entrance (1933)    
Fog Of War (2003)         
Gaslight (1944)  
George Washington Carver At Tuskegee Institute (1937)
Girlfriends (1978)
I Am Somebody (1970)
The Last Waltz (1978)
My Name Is Oona (1969)
A New Leaf (1971)        
Old Yeller (1957)
The Phenix City Story (1955)
Platoon (1986)   
Purple Rain (1984)        
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
She’s Gotta Have It (1986)      
Sleeping Beauty (1959)
Zoot Suit (1981)

Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba” Inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry

Ritchie Valenshas earned a special place in U.S. recording history…

The late Mexican American singer/songwriter’s groundbreaking 1958 sensation “La Bamba”is one of the newest recordings inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress

Ritchie Valens

Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library’s National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with annually selecting 25 titles that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” and are at least 10 years old.

Valens, who was born Richard Valenzuelain Los Angeles in 1941, spoke English as his first language. Though he never mastered Spanish, he learned Spanish songs from his Mexican-American family, including “La Bamba,” a song from the Mexican state of Veracruz that was a favorite dance piece at weddings. 

Valens’ amplified guitar and power chords were a long way from the acoustic string band sounds of Mexico, but he successfully transposed the feeling and rhythm of the song to the back beat of early rock and roll. It was released as the b-side of his second single “Donna” in late 1958, and had become a hit on its own when he died at the age of 17 on February 3, 1959, in a plane crash that also took the lives of Buddy Hollyand J.P. Richardson, “The Big Bopper.” In spite of his brief life and a recording career that only lasted eight months, Valens’ success brought a new sound to the mainstream and inspired generations of Chicano musicians.

Los Lobos released its version of the song in 1987. “As a young boy growing up in East Los Angeles, I was curious and ultimately impressed by a rock song sung in Spanish — that song was ‘La Bamba’ by Ritchie Valens,” said Louie Pérez, one of the founding members and guitarist for Los Lobos. “It continues to be a hallmark in American music and an influence on all Latino music that followed.”

Spanish cellist, composer, and conductor Pablo Casals’ 1939 reimagining of the Bach cello suites was selected in the classical category. Raphaël Merlin, cellist of the acclaimed Ébène Quartet External, said: “There is a prophetic aspect to Pablo Casals’s work—he revealed his recording of the six Bach Cello Suites, and they instantly became our bible, and continue to offer revelations to cellists even to this day. At the same time, he also made a practical case for these works as an ideal way for a musician to exercise his or her mind, cultivate healthy playing technique, study counterpoint, and more. However you look at them, his recording of the suites still sounds like the opening of a new era.”

The new recordings to the National Recording Registry bring the total number of titles on the registry to 525, a small part of the Library’s vast recorded-sound collection of nearly 3 million items.

Here’s a look at the 25 recordings that were selected for inclusion in the registry in 2018:

2018 National Recording Registry

  1. Yiddish Cylinders from the Standard Phonograph Company of New York and the Thomas Lambert Company (c. 1901-1905)
  2. “Memphis Blues” (single), Victor Military Band (1914)
  3. Melville Jacobs Collection of Native Americans of the American Northwest (1929-1939)
  4. “Minnie the Moocher” (single), Cab Calloway (1931)
  5. “Bach Six Cello Suites” (album), Pablo Casals (c. 1939)
  6. “They Look Like Men of War” (single), Deep River Boys (1941)
  7. “Gunsmoke” — Episode: “The Cabin” (Dec. 27, 1952)
  8. Ruth Draper: Complete recorded monologues, Ruth Draper (1954-1956)
  9. “La Bamba” (single), Ritchie Valens (1958)
  10. “Long Black Veil” (single), Lefty Frizzell (1959)
  11. “Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Vol. 1: The Early Years” (album), Stan Freberg (1961)
  12. “GO” (album), Dexter Gordon (1962)
  13. “War Requiem” (album), Benjamin Britten (1963)
  14. “Mississippi Goddam” (single), Nina Simone (1964)
  15. “Soul Man” (single), Sam & Dave (1967)
  16. “Hair” (original Broadway cast recording) (1968)
  17. Speech on the Death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Kennedy (April 4, 1968)
  18. “Sweet Caroline” (single), Neil Diamond (1969)
  19. “Superfly” (album), Curtis Mayfield (1972)
  20. “Ola Belle Reed” (album), Ola Belle Reed (1973)
  21. “September” (single), Earth, Wind & Fire (1978)
  22. “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” (single), Sylvester (1978)
  23. “She’s So Unusual” (album), Cyndi Lauper (1983)
  24. “Schoolhouse Rock!: The Box Set” (1996)
  25. “The Blueprint” (album), Jay-Z (2001)

Gloria & Emilio Estefan: First Hispanic Musicians to Receive the Library of Congress’ Gershwin Prize

Gloria and Emilio Estefan have earned an extra special prize…

The 61-year-old Cuban singer and her 65-year-old Cuban producer husband will receive this year’s Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.

Gloria & Emilio Estefan

The Estefans usher in two firsts for the prize: This year marks the first time it has been awarded to a married couple and the first time it’s awarded to musicians/songwriters of Hispanic descent.

“Emilio and Gloria Estefan… are the creative force behind the popularity of music steeped in the Latino culture,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “This dynamic couple’s professional and personal journey truly mirrors the American dream and we are so pleased to honor their musical legacy.”

Married since 1978, the Estefans catapulted to global fame in 1985 with Miami Sound Machine, creating a unique sound that blended Latin and pop rhythms that pulsed through hits including “Conga,” “Turn the Beat Around,” “Get on Your Feet” and “Rhythm Is Gonna Get You.”

The Estefans were each named BMI’s songwriter of the year and between them have garnered 26 Grammys. Their life story and music were showcased in the Tony Award-nominated Broadway musical On Your Feet!, which they executive produced. In addition to their musical talents, they are also successful entrepreneurs, philanthropists and humanitarians.

Gloria is having a banner year of acknowledgment by the vaunted cultural institutions of the nation’s capital. This past December, Gloria was inducted into the Kennedy Center Honors. She also was part of the ensemble who last year feted 2017’s Gershwin Prize tribute to Tony Bennett.

The Estefans will receive the prize at an all-star tribute concert in March in Washington, D.C., that will later be aired on PBS.

Moreno Among the Recipients of This Year’s Kennedy Center Honors

Rita Moreno continues to rack up the honors…

The 83-year-old Puerto Rican actress, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award at last year’s SAG Awards, has been announced as one of recipients of this year’s Kennedy Center Honors.

Rita Moreno

Each year, the Kennedy Center recognizes a select group for their lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts with the primary criterion in the selection process being excellence. Honorees are chosen by the center’s board of trustees.

Moreno, a Grammy, Oscar, Golden Globe and Tony Award winner, will be honored along side Star Wars patriarch George Lucas, actress Cicely Tyson, songwriter Carole King, conductor Seiji Ozawa and the Eagles.

Moreno, who recently guest-starred on the CW’s Jane the Virgin, has previously received the Library of Congress Living Legends Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a National Medal of Arts and the Latin Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

The event, a fundraiser for the Washington, D.C. arts center, will take place on December 6. CBS will broadcast the star-studded event on December 29.