Bruno Mars Ties Paul Simon for Most Record of the Year Wins as Silk Sonic Claims Four Grammy Awards.

The third time is the historical charm for Bruno Mars.

The 36-year-old part-Puerto Rican singer-songwriter and his Silk Sonic group mate Anderson .Paak claimed four Grammy Awards gramophones during Sunday’s awards show, including Record of the Year, for their chart-topping single “Leave the Door Open.”

Bruno Mars, Anderon .Paak, Silk SonicWith his latest win in one of the top Grammys categories, Mars becomes only the second artist in Grammy history to win record of the year three times, tying Paul Simon. He previously won as featured artist on Mark Ronson‘s “Uptown Funk!” and on his own single for “24K Magic.”

Mars’ other Silk Sonic wins of on Grammy night included Song of the Year, Best R&B Song and Best R&B Performance, in a tie with Jazime Sullivan, for “Leave the Door Open.”

In all, Mars has won 14 Grammys during his career, dating back to 2011.

Bad Bunny has claimed a Grammy for the second year in a row…

The 28-year-old Puerto Rican rapper, singer and record producer won in the Best Música Urbana Album category for El Último Tour Del Mundo. He won in 2021 for Best Latin Pop or Urban Album for YHLQMDLG.

Juanes claimed the Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album for Origen, the third win of the 49-year-old Colombian superstar’s career.

Esperanza Spalding, who beat out Justin Bieber for Best New Artist in 2011, won the Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Album for Songwrights Apothecary Lab.

It’s the fifth Grammy of her career for the 37-year-old part-Latina jazz bassist, singer, songwriter, and composer.

Vicente Fernandez claimed a posthumous Grammy for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) for the late Mexican singer’s A Mis 80’s.

Gonzalo Rubalcaba won the Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album alongside Ron Carter and Jack DeJohnette. It’s the third Grammy win of his career.

The 58-year-old Afro-Cuban jazz pianist and composer won the award for his Skyline project with Carter and DeJohnette.

Eliane Elias claimed the second Gramm of her career…

The 62-year-old Brazilian jazz pianist, singer, composer and arranger was awarded the Best Latin Jazz Album gramophone alongside Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés for Mirror Mirror.

It’s the seventh win of the 80-year-old Cuban pianist Valdes’ career.

Alex Cuba won the first Grammy of his career, winning the award for Best Latin Pop Album for Mendó.

Carlos Rafael Rivera won the Grammy for Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media for The Queen’s Gambit in a tie with Disney‘s Soul.

Los Lobos claimed the Grammy for Best Americana Album for “Native Sons;” Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta won Best Tropical Latin Album for Salswing!, Louis C.K. was awarded the Best Comedy Album award for Sincerely Louis CK; Vince Mendoza claimed the Grammy for Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals for “To The Edge of Longing (Edit Version);” and Gustavo Dudamel claimed the Best Choral Performance Grammy for Mahler: Symphony No. 8, ‘Symphony Of A Thousand.

Here’s the full list of 2022 Grammy winners:

General Field

Record of the Year
“Leave the Door Open” – Silk Sonic
Dernst “D’Mile” Emile II and Bruno Mars, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes and Charles Moniz, engineers/mixers; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer

Album of the Year
“We Are” – Jon Batiste (WINNER)

Song Of The Year
“Leave the Door Open”
Brandon Anderson, Christopher Brody Brown, Dernst Emile II & Bruno Mars, songwriters (Silk Sonic)

Best New Artist
Olivia Rodrigo

Field 1 – Pop

Best Pop Solo Performance
“Drivers License”
Olivia Rodrigo 

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance
“Kiss Me More”
Doja Cat Featuring SZA 

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album
“Love For Sale” (WINNER)
Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga 

Best Pop Vocal Album
“Sour”
Olivia Rodrigo

Field 2 – Dance/Electronic Music 

Best Dance/Electronic Recording
“Alive”
Rüfüs Du Sol 

Best Dance/Electronic Music Album
“Subconsciously”
Black Coffee

Field 3 – Contemporary Instrumental Music

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album
“Tree Falls”
Taylor Eigsti

Field 4 – Rock

Best Rock Performance
“Making a Fire”
Foo Fighters 

Best Metal Performance
“The Alien”
Dream Theater 

Best Rock Album
“Medicine at Midnight”
Foo Fighters

Best Rock Song
“Waiting on a War”
Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Rami Jaffee, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett and Pat Smear, songwriters (Foo Fighters)

Field 5 – Alternative

Best Alternative Music Album
“Daddy’s Home”
St. Vincent

Field 6 – R&B

Best R&B Performance
“Leave the Door Open” (TIE)
Silk Sonic

“Pick Up Your Feelings” (TIE)
Jazmine Sullivan

Best Traditional R&B Performance
“Fight for You”
H.E.R. 

Best Progressive R&B Album
“Table for Two”
Lucky Daye

Best R&B Song
“Leave the Door Open”
Brandon Anderson, Christopher Brody Brown, Dernst Emile II and Bruno Mars, songwriters (Silk Sonic) 

Best R&B Album
“Heaux Tales”
Jazmine Sullivan

Field 7 – Rap

Best Rap Performance
“Family Ties”
Baby Keem featuring Kendrick Lamar 

Best Melodic Rap Performance
“Hurricane”
Kanye West featuring the Weeknd and Lil Baby 

Best Rap Album
“Call Me If You Get Lost”
Tyler, the Creator 

Best Rap Song
“Jail”
Dwayne Abernathy, Jr., Shawn Carter, Raul Cubina, Michael Dean, Charles M. Njapa, Sean Solymar, Kanye West and Mark Williams, songwriters (Kanye West featuring Jay-Z)

Field 8 – Country

Best Country Solo Performance
“You Should Probably Leave”
Chris Stapleton 

Best Country Duo/Group Performance
“Younger Me”
Brothers Osborne 

Best Country Album
“Starting Over”
Chris Stapleton 

Best Country Song
“Cold”
Dave Cobb, J.T. Cure, Derek Mixon and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton) 

Field 9 – New Age

Best New Age Album
“Divine Tides”
Stewart Copeland and Ricky Kej

Field 10 – Jazz 

Best Jazz Vocal Album
“Songwrights Apothecary Lab”
Esperanza Spalding

Best Improvised Jazz Solo
“Humpty Dumpty (Set 2)”
Chick Corea 

Best Jazz Instrumental Album
“Skyline”
Ron Carter, Jack DeJohnette and Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album
“For Jimmy, Wes and Oliver”
Christian McBride Big Band 

Best Latin Jazz Album
“Mirror Mirror”
Eliane Elias with Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés 

Field 11 – Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music

Best Gospel Performance/Song
“Never Lost”
CeCe Winans
Chris Brown, Steven Furtick and Tiffany Hammer, songwriters 

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“Believe for It”
CeCe Winans
Dwan Hill, Kyle Lee, CeCe Winans and Mitch Wong, songwriters 

Best Gospel Album
“Believe for It”
CeCe Winans 

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album
“Old Church Basement”
Elevation Worship and Maverick City Music 

Best Roots Gospel Album
“My Savior”
Carrie Underwood

Field 12 – Latin

Best Latin Pop Album
“Mendó”
Alex Cuba

Best Música Urbana Album
“El Último Tour Del Mundo”
Bad Bunny 

Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album
“Origen”
Juanes 

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)
“A Mis 80’s”
Vicente Fernández 

Best Tropical Latin Album
“Salswing!”
Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta

Field 13 – American Roots Music 

Best American Roots Performance
“Cry”
Jon Batiste 

Best American Roots Song
“Cry”
Jon Batiste and Steve McEwan, songwriters (Jon Batiste) 

Best Americana Album
“Native Sons”
Los Lobos

Best Bluegrass Album
“My Bluegrass Heart”
Béla Fleck 

Best Traditional Blues Album
“I Be Trying”
Cedric Burnside

Best Contemporary Blues Album
“662”
Christone “Kingfish” Ingram 

Best Folk Album
“They’re Calling Me Home”
Rhiannon Giddens with Francesco Turrisi 

Best Regional Roots Music Album
“Kau Ka Pe’a”
Kalani Pe’a

Field 14 – Reggae

Best Reggae Album
“Beauty in the Silence”
SOJA

Field 15 – Global Music

Best Global Music Performance
“Mohabbat”
Arooj Aftab 

Best Global Music Album
“Mother Nature”
Angélique Kidjo

Field 16 – Children’s

Best Children’s Music Album
“A Colorful World”
Falu

Field 17 – Spoken Word

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling)
“Carry On: Reflections for a New Generation from John Lewis”
Don Cheadle

Field 18 – Comedy 

Best Comedy Album
“Sincerely Louis CK” (WINNER)
Louis C.K.

Field 19 – Musical Theater

Best Musical Theater Album
“The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical”
Emily Bear, producer; Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear, composer and lyricist
(Barlow and Bear)

Field 20 – Music for Visual Media

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media
“The United States vs. Billie Holiday”
Andra Day
Salaam Remi, compilation producer; Lynn Fainchtein, music supervisor 

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media
“The Queen’s Gambit” (TIE)
Carlos Rafael Rivera, composer

“Soul” (TIE)
Jon Batiste, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, composers 

Best Song Written For Visual Media
“All Eyes on Me” (from Bo Burnham: Inside)
Bo Burnham (Bo Burnham)

Field 21 – Composing/Arranging

Best Instrumental Composition
“Eberhard” (WINNER)
Lyle Mays, composer (Lyle Mays) 

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella
“Meta Knight’s Revenge (From “Kirby Super Star”)”
Charlie Rosen and Jake Silverman, arrangers (The 8-Bit Big Band featuring Button Masher)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals
“To The Edge of Longing (Edit Version)”
Vince Mendoza, arranger (Vince Mendoza, Czech National Symphony Orchestra and Julia Bullock)

Field 22 – Package, Notes, and Historical

Best Recording Package
“Pakelang”
Li Jheng Han and Yu, Wei, art directors (2nd Generation Falangao Singing Group and the Chairman Crossover Big Band) 

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package
“All Things Must Pass: 50th Anniversary Edition” (WINNER)
Darren Evans, Dhani Harrison and Olivia Harrison, art directors (George Harrison) 

Best Album Notes
“The Complete Louis Armstrong Columbia and RCA Victor Studio Sessions 1946-1966”
Ricky Riccardi, album notes writer (Louis Armstrong) 

Best Historical Album
“Joni Mitchell Archives, Vol. 1: The Early Years (1963-1967)” (WINNER)
Patrick Milligan and Joni Mitchell, compilation producers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Joni Mitchell)

Field 23 – Production 

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
“Love for Sale” (WINNER)
Dae Bennett, Josh Coleman and Billy Cumella, engineers; Greg Calbi and Steve Fallone, mastering engineers (Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga) 

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical
Jack Antonoff
• Chemtrails Over the Country Club (Lana Del Rey) (A)
• Daddy’s Home (St. Vincent) (A)
• Gold Rush (Taylor Swift) (T)
• Sling (Clairo) (A)
• Solar Power (Lorde) (A)
• Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night (Bleachers) (A) 

Best Remixed Recording
“Passenger” (Mike Shinoda remix) (WINNER)
Mike Shinoda, remixer (Deftones) 

Best Immersive Audio Album
“Alicia”
George Massenburg and Eric Schilling, immersive mix engineers; Michael Romanowski, immersive mastering engineer; Ann Mincieli, immersive producer (Alicia Keys) 

Best Engineered Album, Classical
“Chanticleer Sings Christmas”
Leslie Ann Jones, engineer (Chanticleer) 

Producer Of The Year, Classical
Judith Sherman
• Alone Together (Jennifer Koh) (A)
• Bach & Beyond Part 3 (Jennifer Koh) (A)
• Bruits (Imani Winds) (A)
• Eryilmaz: Dances Of The Yogurt Maker (Erberk Eryilmaz & Carpe Diem String Quartet) (A)
• Fantasy – Oppens Plays Kaminsky (Ursula Oppens) (A)
• Home (Blythe Gaissert) (A)
• Mendelssohn, Visconti & Golijov (Jasper String Quartet & Jupiter String Quartet) (A)
• A Schubert Journey (Llŷr Williams) (A)
• Vers Le Silence – William Bolcom & Frederic Chopin (Ran Dank) (A)

Field 24 – Classical

Best Orchestral Performance
“Price: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3”
Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor (Philadelphia Orchestra) 

Best Opera Recording
“Glass: Akhnaten” (WINNER)
Karen Kamensek, conductor; J’Nai Bridges, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Zachary James and Dísella Lárusdóttir; David Frost, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus) 

Best Choral Performance
“Mahler: Symphony No. 8, ‘Symphony Of A Thousand’”
Gustavo Dudamel, conductor; Grant Gershon, Robert Istad, Fernando Malvar-Ruiz and Luke McEndarfer, chorus masters (Leah Crocetto, Mihoko Fujimura, Ryan McKinny, Erin Morley, Tamara Mumford, Simon O’Neill, Morris Robinson and Tamara Wilson; Los Angeles Philharmonic; Los Angeles Children’s Chorus, Los Angeles Master Chorale, National Children’s Chorus and Pacific Chorale) 

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance
“Beethoven: Cello Sonatas – Hope Amid Tears”
Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax 

Best Classical Instrumental Solo
“Alone Together
Jennifer Koh

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album
“Mythologies”
Sangeeta Kaur and Hila Plitmann (Virginie D’Avezac De Castera, Lili Haydn, Wouter Kellerman, Nadeem Majdalany, Eru Matsumoto and Emilio D. Miler) 

Best Classical Compendium
“Women Warriors – The Voices Of Change”
Amy Andersson, conductor; Amy Andersson, Mark Mattson and Lolita Ritmanis, producers 

Best Contemporary Classical Composition
“Shaw: Narrow Sea”
Caroline Shaw, composer (Dawn Upshaw, Gilbert Kalish and Sō Percussion)

Field 25 – Music Video/Film

Best Music Video
“Freedom”
Jon Batiste
Alan Ferguson, video director; Alex P. Willson, video producer 

Best Music Film
“Summer of Soul” – (Various Artists)
Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, video director; David Dinerstein, Robert Fyvolent & Joseph Patel, video producers

Flaco Jiménez’s “Partners” Album Among This Year’s National Recording Registry Selections

Flaco Jiménez is being added to the registry

One of the 82-year-old Mexican American singer, songwriter and accordionist’s most popular albums Partners, released by Warner Bros. Records in 1992, is one of this year’s National Recording Registry selections.

Flaco Jiménez

Jiménez, a Tejano music legend, appears on the new list of classic recordings joining the registry that Janet Jackson‘s 1989 album Rhythm Nation 1814, Kool & the Gang‘s buoyant single “Celebration“; Nas‘ game-changing debut album Illmatic and timeless children’s titles Free To Be… You And Me and “The Rainbow Connection.”

“Partners” by Jiménez, a champion of traditional conjunto music and Tex-Mex culture who is also known for innovation and collaboration with a variety of artists. This bilingual album features collaborations with Linda Ronstadt, Ry Cooder, Emmylou Harris and Los Lobos, among others.

The addition of 25 recordings this year brings to 575 the total number of titles in the registry, which selects recordings worthy of preservation based on their cultural, historical and/or aesthetic importance in the nation’s recorded sound heritage.

Nearly 900 titles were submitted for recognition this year.

“The National Recording Registry will preserve our history through these vibrant recordings of music and voices that have reflected our humanity and shaped our culture from the past 143 years,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said in a statement.

Here’s the complete list, in chronological order:
1. Edison’s “St. Louis tinfoil” recording (1878)
2. “Nikolina” — Hjalmar Peterson (1917 single)
3. “Smyrneikos Balos” — Marika Papagika (1928) (single)
4. “When the Saints Go Marching In” — Louis Armstrong & his Orchestra (1938) (single)
5. Christmas Eve Broadcast – Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill (December 24, 1941)
6. “The Guiding Light” — November 22, 1945
7. Odetta Sings Ballads and Blues — Odetta (1957) (album)
8. “Lord, Keep Me Day by Day” — Albertina Walker and the Caravans (1959) (single)
9. Roger Maris hits his 61st homerun (October 1, 1961)
10. Aida — Leontyne Price, et.al. (1962) (album)
11. “Once a Day” — Connie Smith (1964) (single)
12. Born Under a Bad Sign — Albert King (1967) (album)
13. Free to Be…You & Me — Marlo Thomas and Friends (1972) (album)
14. The Harder They Come — Jimmy Cliff (1972) (album)
15. “Lady Marmalade” — LaBelle (1974) (single)
16. Late for the Sky — Jackson Browne (1974) (album)
17. Bright Size Life — Pat Metheny (1976) (album)
18. “The Rainbow Connection” — Kermit the Frog (1979) (single)
19. “Celebration” — Kool & the Gang (1980) (single)
20. Richard Strauss: Four Last Songs — Jessye Norman (1983) (album)
21. Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814 — Janet Jackson (1989) (album)
22. Partners — Flaco Jiménez (1992) (album)
23. “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”/”What A Wonderful World” — Israel
Kamakawiwo’ole (1993) (single)
24. Illmatic — Nas (1994) (album)
25. “This American Life: The Giant Pool of Money” (May 9, 2008)

Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba” Inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry

Ritchie Valenshas earned a special place in U.S. recording history…

The late Mexican American singer/songwriter’s groundbreaking 1958 sensation “La Bamba”is one of the newest recordings inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress

Ritchie Valens

Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library’s National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with annually selecting 25 titles that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” and are at least 10 years old.

Valens, who was born Richard Valenzuelain Los Angeles in 1941, spoke English as his first language. Though he never mastered Spanish, he learned Spanish songs from his Mexican-American family, including “La Bamba,” a song from the Mexican state of Veracruz that was a favorite dance piece at weddings. 

Valens’ amplified guitar and power chords were a long way from the acoustic string band sounds of Mexico, but he successfully transposed the feeling and rhythm of the song to the back beat of early rock and roll. It was released as the b-side of his second single “Donna” in late 1958, and had become a hit on its own when he died at the age of 17 on February 3, 1959, in a plane crash that also took the lives of Buddy Hollyand J.P. Richardson, “The Big Bopper.” In spite of his brief life and a recording career that only lasted eight months, Valens’ success brought a new sound to the mainstream and inspired generations of Chicano musicians.

Los Lobos released its version of the song in 1987. “As a young boy growing up in East Los Angeles, I was curious and ultimately impressed by a rock song sung in Spanish — that song was ‘La Bamba’ by Ritchie Valens,” said Louie Pérez, one of the founding members and guitarist for Los Lobos. “It continues to be a hallmark in American music and an influence on all Latino music that followed.”

Spanish cellist, composer, and conductor Pablo Casals’ 1939 reimagining of the Bach cello suites was selected in the classical category. Raphaël Merlin, cellist of the acclaimed Ébène Quartet External, said: “There is a prophetic aspect to Pablo Casals’s work—he revealed his recording of the six Bach Cello Suites, and they instantly became our bible, and continue to offer revelations to cellists even to this day. At the same time, he also made a practical case for these works as an ideal way for a musician to exercise his or her mind, cultivate healthy playing technique, study counterpoint, and more. However you look at them, his recording of the suites still sounds like the opening of a new era.”

The new recordings to the National Recording Registry bring the total number of titles on the registry to 525, a small part of the Library’s vast recorded-sound collection of nearly 3 million items.

Here’s a look at the 25 recordings that were selected for inclusion in the registry in 2018:

2018 National Recording Registry

  1. Yiddish Cylinders from the Standard Phonograph Company of New York and the Thomas Lambert Company (c. 1901-1905)
  2. “Memphis Blues” (single), Victor Military Band (1914)
  3. Melville Jacobs Collection of Native Americans of the American Northwest (1929-1939)
  4. “Minnie the Moocher” (single), Cab Calloway (1931)
  5. “Bach Six Cello Suites” (album), Pablo Casals (c. 1939)
  6. “They Look Like Men of War” (single), Deep River Boys (1941)
  7. “Gunsmoke” — Episode: “The Cabin” (Dec. 27, 1952)
  8. Ruth Draper: Complete recorded monologues, Ruth Draper (1954-1956)
  9. “La Bamba” (single), Ritchie Valens (1958)
  10. “Long Black Veil” (single), Lefty Frizzell (1959)
  11. “Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, Vol. 1: The Early Years” (album), Stan Freberg (1961)
  12. “GO” (album), Dexter Gordon (1962)
  13. “War Requiem” (album), Benjamin Britten (1963)
  14. “Mississippi Goddam” (single), Nina Simone (1964)
  15. “Soul Man” (single), Sam & Dave (1967)
  16. “Hair” (original Broadway cast recording) (1968)
  17. Speech on the Death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Kennedy (April 4, 1968)
  18. “Sweet Caroline” (single), Neil Diamond (1969)
  19. “Superfly” (album), Curtis Mayfield (1972)
  20. “Ola Belle Reed” (album), Ola Belle Reed (1973)
  21. “September” (single), Earth, Wind & Fire (1978)
  22. “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” (single), Sylvester (1978)
  23. “She’s So Unusual” (album), Cyndi Lauper (1983)
  24. “Schoolhouse Rock!: The Box Set” (1996)
  25. “The Blueprint” (album), Jay-Z (2001)

J Balvin’s “Ginza” Wins Big at the BMI Latin Music Awards

The accolades keep coming for J Balvin

The 31-year-old Colombian singer picked up a big prize at the annual BMI Latin Music Awards, which were held at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills.

J Balvin

J Balvin, who recently joined voices with former Fifth Harmony member Camila Cabello and Pitbull on a single for the latest Fast & Furious movie, earned Contemporary Latin Song of the Year 2016 honors for his hit single “Ginza.”

Horacio Palencia won Regional Mexican Song of the Year for his hit “Solo con verte” (Banda MS). He was also awarded with the Regional Mexican Songwriter of the Year for the sixth time.

The iconic East L.A. band Los Lobos, whose career spans more than four decades, was honored with the special BMI Icon Award and celebrated by taking the stage and performing a medley of their classic tunes.

For the second year in a row, the BMI Latin publisher of the year award went to Sony/ATV Music Publishing with 14 songs among the most popular of the year, including Gente de Zona‘s “La gozadera,” Ricky Martin‘s “La mordidita” and Yandel‘s “Encantadora.”

Here’s the complete list of honorees:

Below is the complete list of winners.

Icon Award

LOS LOBOS

Regional Mexican Song of the Year 2016

SOLO CON VERTE
Horacio Palencia
Briser Publishing

Contemporary Latin Song of the Year 2016

GINZA
J Balvin
Universal-Música Unica Publishing

Regional Mexican Songwriter of the Year 2016

HORACIO PALENCIA
Piénsalo
Por Si Estás Con El Pendiente
Solo Con Verte
Ya Te Perdí La Fe

Contemporary Latin Songwriter of the Year 2016

JOSÉ “GOCHO” TORRES
Ahora Que Te Vas
No Me Llamas
Si Lo Hacemos Bien

ARBISE “MOTIFF” GONZALEZ
La Gozadera
Me Voy Enamorando
Traidora

Latin Publisher of the Year 2016

SONY/ATV MUSIC PUBLISHING
Ahora Que Te Vas
Disparo Al Corazón
Encantadora
Fanática Sensual
La Gozadera
La Mordidita
Lejos De Aquí
Me Voy Enamorando
No Me Llamas
Nota De Amor
Perdido En Tus Ojos
Si Lo Hacemos Bien
Te Busco
Traidora

Award Winning Songs

A Lo Mejor
Espinoza Paz
Don Corazon Publishing
GSALL Music
Universal Music-Careers

Ahora Que Te Vas
José “Gocho” Torres
Platinum Muse Music Publishing LLC
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

Bonito Y Bello
Jesús Omar Tarazón
Grandes Exitos Arpa Musical
Songs of Melody

Borro Cassette
Juan “Maluma” Londono

Cajita De Cartón
Wilfran Castillo (SAYCO)
SER-CA Publishing, Inc.

Como Tú No Hay Dos
J. Martin “El Cuate” Garcia
Ruben “El Cuate” Garcia
Gar-Mex Music

Culpa Al Corazón
Geoffrey “Prince Royce” Rojas
peermusic III, Ltd.

Debajo Del Puente
Salvador Aponte
Rogelio Salazar
Gar-Mex Music

Después De Ti, ¿Quién?
Espinoza Paz
Anval Music
Don Corazon Publishing
Los Compositores Publishing
Universal Music-Careers

Disparo Al Corazón
Pedro Capó
Ricky Martin
Dharmik Music
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.
Timbasoul Publications
Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

El Amor De Su Vida
Julio Cesar Bahumea Ayala
JA International Publishing

El Papel Cambio
Cuitla Vega
Las Quintas Music Publishing, Inc.

Encantadora
Egbert Rosa “Haze”
Eduardo A. Vargas Berrios “Dynell”
Llandel Veguilla Malavé “Yandel”
Kobalt Music Publishing America, Inc.
La Leyenda Publishing
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC
Xuanlu Melody Music

Fanática Sensual
David Rafael Duran
Egbert Rosa “Haze”
Orlando Javier Valle Vega “Chencho”
Edwin F. Vásquez “Maldy”
Duran Music
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

Ginza
J Balvin
Universal-Música Unica Publishing

Juntos
Juanes
Parce Music LLC
Universal-Songs of PolyGram International, Inc.
Wonderland Music Company, Inc.

La Gozadera
Arbise “Motiff” Gonzalez
Pull The Plug Music
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

La Miel De Su Saliva
Alfonso Lizárraga
Editora Arpa Musical
LGA Music Publishing
Los Compositores Publishing
Máximo Aguirre Music Publishing, Inc.

La Mordidita
Beatriz Luengo
Ricky Martin
Dharmik Music
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

Las Cosas De La Vida
Carlos Vives
Kobalt Music Publishing America, Inc.
Write Bright Publishing

Lejos De Aquí
Víctor Viera Moore “Jumbo”
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.

Malditas Ganas
José Alfredo Ríos “El Komander”
peermusic III, Ltd.
Twiins House of Music

Me Voy Enamorando
Arbise “Motiff” Gonzalez
Miguel Ignacio Mendoza “Nacho”
Jesús Alberto Miranda “Chino”
Servando Moriche Primera Mussett
Pull The Plug Music
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC
Universal Music-Careers
Universal-Música Unica Publishing

Muchachita Linda
Juan Luis Guerra
Universal-Música Unica Publishing

Nada Más Por Eso
Jesús Omar Tarazón
BMG Platinum Songs
DEL Melodies

No Me Llamas
José “Gocho” Torres
Platinum Muse Music Publishing LLC
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

No Quería Engañarte
Wilfran Castillo (SAYCO)
SER-CA Publishing, Inc.

No Valoraste
Roberto Tapia
Roberto Tapia Music

Nota De Amor
Juan Luis Morera Luna “Wisin”
Marcos Alfonso Ramírez Carrasquillo
Víctor R. Torres Betancourt
Carlos Vives
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC
Yele Publishing

Panchito El F1
Mario Quintero
Canciones Primo Music

Perdido En Tus Ojos
Natti Natasha
Don Omar
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.

Piénsalo
Geovani Cabrera
Horacio Palencia
Briser Publishing

Pongámonos De Acuerdo
Alfredo Olivas
JA International Publishing
Universal Music-Careers

Por Si Estás Con El Pendiente
Horacio Palencia
Songs of Matanga Publishing

Que Aún Te Amo
Mario Alberto Zapata Montalvo
Editora Marcha Musical

¿Qué Tal Si Eres Tú?
Alejandro Bassi
Tigres Del Norte Ediciones Musicales

Qué Tiene Él
Keith Nieto
Aztekas Publishing

Si Lo Hacemos Bien
Norgie Noriega
José “Gocho” Torres
Noriega Music Publishing
Platinum Muse Music Publishing LLC
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC
Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

Solita
D’Lesly Lora
Geoffrey “Prince Royce” Rojas
Yonathan Then
Dice World Publishing
Mickey Then Publishing
peermusic III, Ltd.
Tenyor Music
Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

Solo Con Verte
Horacio Palencia
Briser Publishing

Suena La Banda
Mario Quintero
Canciones Primo Music

Sunset
Tarik Johnston “Rvssian”
Shaggy
Nikolas “Sniggy” Silvera
NW Collections
Ten27 Diamond Music
Universal-Música Unica Publishing

Te Busco
José Fernando Suárez “Cosculluela”
Eduardo Gonzalez
Luis Jorge Romero
Elijah Alexander Sarraga
Aquos Music Publishing
EMI-Blackwood Music, Inc.
Evo Black Music
Knockout Trax
Kobalt Music Publishing America, Inc.
peermusic III, Ltd.
Young Hollywood Music Group

Te Cambio El Domicilio
Jesús Omar Tarazón
Andaluz Music, Inc.

Traidora
Arbise “Motiff” Gonzalez
Pull The Plug Music
Sony/ATV Latin Music Publishing LLC

Un Desengaño
Cesar Andres Alaffa
Juan José Paez Paez (SACM)
SER-CA Publishing, Inc.

Vete Acostumbrando
Rodolfo Carlo Pérez Bribiesca
Sodin Productions LLC

Y Por Lo Pronto
Alfredo Olivas
Universal Music-Careers

¿Y Qué Ha Sido De Ti?
Espinoza Paz
Don Corazon Publishing
Los Compositores Publishing
Sublime Lyrics
Universal Music-Careers

Ya Te Perdí La Fe
Horacio Palencia
Ferca Global Publishing
Universal Music-Careers

 

Los Lobos to Receive BMI Icon Award

The members of Los Lobos are reuniting for a special honor…

The multiple Grammy-winning rock band from East Los Angeles, best known for their hit version of “La Bamba,” will receive the BMI Icon Award during the organization’s 24th annual Latin Awards.

Los Lobos

The event, to be hosted by BMI president & CEO Mike O’Neill and Delia Orjuela, BMI VP of Latin Writer/Publisher Relations, will be held March 21 at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills.

Formed in 1973 by David Hidalgo, Cesar Rosas, Louie Perez and Conrad Lozano — fellow students at Garfield High School in East L.A. — Los Lobos (the group also includes Steve Berlin and Enrique Gonzalez), have been doing Latin music long before Latin music was cool, blending rock ‘n roll with Chicano roots.

The group, bilingual and bicultural before the concept became a buzzword, rose to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1987 with their cover of Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba,” the same year they won a Grammy in the-then newly instated category of Best Mexican American Performance for the song “Anselma.”

Los Lobos’ exploration of the musical landscape has continued unabated, spanning Latin, folk, rock and even R&B. They’ve collected three Grammy awards along the way, plus Billboard’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001.

The BMI Icon Award, whose past recipients include Gloria Estefan, Paul Simon, Dolly Parton and Carlos Santana, is presented to songwriters who have had unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.

“Los Lobos have been musical ambassadors to the Mexican-American community,” said BMI’s Orjuela in a statement. “Their music reflects the diversity and musical heritage of America, weaving together blues, rock, norteño, and cumbia.”

During the March 21 ceremony, BMI will also honor the Latin songwriter, song and publisher of the year plus the writers and publishers of BMI’s most-performed songs of the past year.

This will also mark the first time ever that BMI expands its criteria for determining winners; in addition to terrestrial radio performances, data will also include streaming and satellite radio.

Valens the Subject of a New Licensing & Merchandising deal with C3 Entertainment

Ritchie Valens is making a posthumous comeback…

The late Mexican American “La Bamba” singer’s popularity may increase in the coming months with products like La Bamba Cola, on-line video games and limited-edition guitars.

Ritchie Valens

Valens — who died with Buddy Holly in a 1959 plane crash — will be promoted through an official licensing and merchandising deal with Southern California-based C3 Entertainment.

It marks the first time that the image of the teenage Latino rock pioneer will be promoted through an official licensing initiative sanctioned by Valens’ family.

“More than a retro endeavor, the multicultural aspect of Valens’ licensing program is pivotal,” Ani Khachoian, C3 Entertainment’s Executive Vice President of Licensing, Merchandising and Distribution, told Billboard via email. “We want to make sure every fan has the opportunity to rediscover this rock ’n’ roll icon, and that we introduce Valens to new audiences. He was a talented, positive young man, who worked hard. It’s a wonderful legacy for young people.”

C3 also represents the legacy of The Big Bopper, who died in the snowy crash with Valens and Holly while on their Winter Dance Party tour.

Valens, best known for his hit “La Bamba,” signed to Del-Fi Records in 1958 and recorded two albums, releasing singles that included “Donna,” which reached no. 2 on the Billboard pop chart.

The 1978 movie La Bamba, starring Lou Diamond Phillips with music performed by Los Lobos, brought Valens’ story to new audiences; the soundtrack album sold 2 million copies in the United States.

C3’s Khachoian says that a La Bamba Cola beverage is set to be manufactured and distributed by the Rocket Fizz Soda Pop & Candy Shops chain. Online games, clothing and collectibles are also in the works.

“We’re passionate about securing limited-edition guitars – Valens played several different models of guitars,” Khachoian adds. “We are also positioning him for advertising and live events.”

Jennifer Lopez & Shakira Among the Featured Artists in HBO’s Latin Music-Themed Doc “The Latin Explosion: A New America”

Ready to get a history lesson in Latin music movement in the United States? Then don’t miss a special documentary from HBO.

HBO’s documentary film The Latin Explosion: A New America will debut Monday, November 16 on HBO and HBO Latino and simulcast in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Jennifer Lopez & Shakira

Created and executive produced by music mogul Tommy Mottola, The Latin Explosion: A New America celebrates the artists and visionaries who have exploded onto the U.S. music scene and gone on to become global superstars, from Desi Arnaz to Romeo Santos.

The film shows how those acts have influenced every aspect of American society, from culture to politics to the economy.

The film ranges from the cha-cha and mambo crazes of the ‘50s, with Arnaz and Rita Moreno, and the edgier ‘60s, reflected by Carlos Santana and Jose Feliciano, to the exciting new sound of salsa in the ‘70s and the emergence of superstars Gloria Estefan and Emilio Estefan in the ‘80s.

The film also spotlights the Latino boom of the late ‘90s, led by Ricky Martin, Shakira, Mark Anthony and Jennifer Lopez, and today’s hottest stars, Pitbull and Santos.

Some of the featured artists discuss how their crossover hits have played a role in defining the American experience, setting the stage for today’s Latin Explosion.

Other artists featured include Eva Longoria, George Lopez, Los Lobos, Cheech Marin, Thalía and Sofía Vergara. John Leguizamo is the narrator.

“We have assembled the largest array of Latino superstars ever in a film telling a powerful story of their history and immigration, politics, and rise from a small minority population to the most critical demographic in the United States,” comments Mottola.

The Latin Explosion: A New America is directed and produced by Matthew O’Neill and Jon Alpert.

Jimenez Inducted Into the Austin City Limits Hall of Fame

Flaco Jimenez’s name will appear in the Austin City Limits history books…

The 76-year-old Mexican American Conjunto, Norteño and Tejano music accordionist and a member of the Tejano fusion group Texas Tornadoswho received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award earlier this year, has been inducted into the Austin City Limits Hall of Fame.

Flaco Jimenez

During the 2nd annual Austin City Limits Hall of Fame concert on Thursday, Jimenez was inducted with a class that included Loretta Lynn, Guy Clark, Asleep at the Wheel and the late Townes Van Zandt.

Jimenez’s short but sweet acceptance speech prefaced an upbeat six-song set earlier in the night with conjunto band Max Baca & Los TexManiacs featuring David Hidalgo of Los Lobos on guitar and vocals. Midway through, Dwight Yoakam came aboard to sing lead, with Jimenez’s colorful accordion accents propelling the extended cast on “Streets of Bakersfield” and Warren Zevon’s “Carmelita.”

The green room was jam-packed just moments earlier with friends, family and fellow musicians who just wanted to be close to Jimenez, who received the loudest reception of the night. He beamed recounting how Yoakam had mentioned his military service as an Army artilleryman during the Korean War.

“I was proud to serve my country,” Jimenez said.

Jimenez, a five-time Grammy winner, has enjoyed a successful career that has spanned more than six decades. In that time, he’s collaborated with artists like Bob Dylan, Ry Cooder, Doug Sahm and Carlos Santana.

Morrison to Headline Austin’s Pachanga Latino Music Festival

Carla Morrison is about to pachanga in Texas…

The 26-year-old Mexican pop-rock singer-songwriter, who won a Latin Grammy last November for best alternative song, will perform at this year’s Pachanga Latino Music Festival next month.

Carla Morrison

It’ll be Morrison’s first appearance at the festival, which will be held on May 10 and 11 at Fiesta Gardens in Austin, Texas.

In addition to Morrison, other big name performers for the sixth installment of the festival include Intocable, Los Lobos and 3Ball MTY.

Intocable and 3Ball MTY will headline on Friday night, while Morrison, Celso Piña and Enjambre are among the main acts on Saturday night.

The bill also features Grupo Fantasma, Vallejo, Este Vato, Gina Chavez, Como Las Movies, Bang Data, Susan Torres y Conjunto Clemencia, Selena y Los Burritos, Miranda Gil and Anthropos Musicians Collective.

“We are so excited about the line-up this year,” says Rich Garza, founder of festival, in a statement. “The addition of Carla Morrison and Enjambre to this year really brings us up another notch. We love that we can showcase all this music from Mexico, Austin and beyond.”

Tickets are on sale in one-day, two-day and VIP packages. Specially-priced general admission tickets start at $39 and are available with the full line-up at the Pachanga website.

A portion of all proceeds will benefit the FuturoFund Austin charity.