Chayanne Releases First Song in Four Years, “Te Amo y Punto”

Chayanne is back with new music…

The 53-year-old Puerto Rican singer and actor has released “Te Amo y Punto,” his first song in four years.

ChayanneIt’s the first single off Chayanne’s upcoming album.

Staying true to his core essence, the song is a striking ballad about love. Injecting heavy emotion into his delivery, Chayanne reignites optimism with the song’s vocals, and hope that not all is lost.

“This song was the creation of a great group of professionals and based on the noblest feeling in life: love,” Chayanne says in a statement. “I always want to remind people that despite the speed at which we live today and that above any priority, love is the greatest of feelings and will always fill our souls.”

The new track, produced by Luis Salazar, was penned by Édgar Barrera, Elena Rose and Richi López.

Christian Nodal Releases New Single “Vivo en el 6”

Christian Nodal is live with new music… 

The 23-year-old Mexican singer-songwriter has released the new single “Vivo en el 6.

Christian NodalThe track sticks to Nadal’s own personal stamp, dubbed Mariacheño.

Written by Nodal alongside producer and composer Édgar Barrera and singer-songwriter Edén Muñoz, the song centers on a man who has given up on love and is ready to accept the single life.

“I bid farewell to love because it doesn’t work/From now on I’ll be friends with alcohol and loneliness,” Nodal powerfully sings.

ChocQuibTown Releases New Single “Bitcoin”

ChocQuibTown is having a bit(coin) of fun…

The Colombian group, composed of Goyo, Tostao and Slow, has released their new single “Bitcoin.”

ChocQuibTownCo-written by the group, Gerald Jiménez, Edgar Barrera, Jael Andrés Correa and Juan Diego Medina, the lyrics hold a very mature reflection after a breakup.

“I’m only rising, I look like a bitcoin and you’re calling me like a loser,” chants Goyo. “You never gave me importance, now respect the distance.”

Produced by Slow himself, “Bitcoin” is a catchy urban pop single with the group’s rhythmic melodies at the root.

Goyo recently embarked on her solo career but made it very clear that ChocQuibTown was not separating. This single is evidence of that promise.

Banda MS Earns 17th No. 1 on Billboard’s Regional Mexican Airplay Chart with “Ojos Cerrados”

It’s an eye-closing moment for Banda MS

The Mexican banda act has earned its 17th No. 1 on Billboard’s Regional Mexican Airplay chart as “Ojos Cerrados” jumps 2-1 in its seventh week on the March 5-dated ranking.

Banda-MSThe track is Banda MS’ first collaboration with Carin León, who climbs up the list (31-18) with another collaboration: “Con Un Botecito a Pecho” with Adriel Favela.

“Ojos Cerrados” leads with 6.66 million in audience impressions, up 15%, earned in the week ending Feb. 27, according to MRC Data.

The track was released on January 7 via Lizos Music and composed by Horacio Palencia, Nathan Galante and Edgar Barrera.

With 17 No. 1s on its account, Banda MS breaks from a tie with four other groups for the second-most leaders, standing just behind Calibre 50’s 21 champs, since the chart’s inception in 1994.

Here’s a recap of the acts with the most leaders on Regional Mexican Airplay:

21, Calibre 50
17, Banda MS
16, Banda El Recodo de Cruz de Lizárraga
16, Conjunto Primavera
16, Intocable
16, La Arrolladora Banda El Limón de René Camacho
15, Los Tigres del Norte
15, Christian Nodal
11, Gerardo Ortiz
11, La Arrolladora Banda San José de Mesillas

“Ojos Cerrados” concurrently makes progress on the all-genre Latin Airplay chart with a 9-6 lift.

Back on Regional Mexican Airplay, “Ojos” follows another No. 1: “La Sinvergüenza,” a two-week champ (starting chart dated Nov. 27, 2021). Notably, out of Banda MS’ 17 hits, only three arrived through collaborations: in addition to the two already mentioned, “Somos Los Que Somos” with Los 2 De La S, ruled for one week in September 2020.

Camilo Teaming Up with Grupo Firme for New Collaboration

Camilo has firmed up his next collaboration…

The 27-year-old Colombian singer, musician and songwriter was spotted hanging out with Grupo Firme at a recording studio earlier this week.

Camilo

Grupo Firme spilled some details to Billboard on the Premio Lo Nuestro red carpet.

“I don’t know if I can say much, but we made a really good collaboration,” vocalist Eduin Caz said, adding that Edgar Barrera composed the song. “The song came out great, but soon we’ll reveal more information and when it’s coming.”

Backstage at the media center, Camilo admitted to being a faithful Grupo Firme fan and always listening to their music at home.

“Them, and El Fantasma, is what I mostly listen to,” he said. “I had a lot of desire to work with them. The energy at the studio is mutual, and we always have a good time. I love what they represent.”

Banda MS Teams Up with Carin Leon for Banda Ballad “Ojos Cerrados”

Banda MS has set its sights on a new No. 1…

The Mexican banda group has joined voices with Carin Leon for the new single “Ojos Cerrados,” released by Lizos Music.

Banda MS, Carin Leon

The track is considered an ultimate heartbreak song that’s powered by Banda MS’ signature tuba-pumping beat and romantic lyrics.

A ballad at its core, the single marks the first time the chart-topping band and newcomer Leon have teamed up for a collaboration.

The slowed-down banda track, penned by Edgar BarreraHoracio Palencia and Nathan Galante Rosales, finds Oswaldo, Alan and Leon narrating the downfall of a relationship and the scar its left behind.

 

Camilo Releases New Punk-Pop Single “Pesadilla”

Camilo is punkin’ things up…

The 27-year-old Colombian Latin Grammy-winning singer-songwriter has gone punk-pop on his new single titled “Pesadilla,” which was released on Tuesday alongside a quirky music video.

CamiloThe track — which features an earworm hook (“Bye bye bye bye”) — follows Camilo’s “Indigo,” a collaboration with his wife Evaluna Montaner, which they dropped back in October.

The Café Tacvba-esque track, penned by Camilo and longtime collaborator Edgar Barrera, takes inspiration from Camilo’s love for Mexican-music influences, which have always played an integral role in his sonority.

In “Pesadilla,” Camilo sings about the nightmare of losing one’s partner to a rival. “But not even in my dreams you’ll take her away from me,” he declares in song.

About the music video, directed by Evaluna, who’s expecting the couple’s first baby, Camilo said: “Evaluna and I felt like it couldn’t be a literal portrayal, or aesthetically coherent with everyday occurrences. It needed to be a dreamlike video that highlights our colors as well as Mexico’s, both of which always inspire us.”

Camilo spoke to Billboard during the 2021 Latin Grammys in November, where he won four awards, about his inspiration and how it shapes his identity. “Inspiration is not something you can reach. I think it’s something divine and a gift you receive from above. That’s when one finds their identity,” he said.

Camilo’s Mis Manos, which won the Latin Grammy for best pop vocal album, is now up for best Latin pop album at the 2022 Grammy Awards.

Tainy Tops Billboard’s End-of-Year Hot Latin Songs Producers Chart

Tainy is a producer on top…

The 32-year-old Puerto Rican record producer and songwriter comes in at No. 1 on Billboard’s end-of-year Hot Latin Songs Producers chart.

TainyIn all, Tainy placed 25 tracks on the chart during the eligibility period of November 21, 2020, through Nov. 13, 2021 to rank at the summit.

The list includes hits like Bad Bunny and Jhay Cortez‘s “Dákiti,” Selena Gomez‘s “De Una Vez” and one of his most recent hits “Lo Siento BB:/” with Julieta Venegas and Bunny.

Other top 10 producers on the chart include Edgar Barrera. He boasts a wide-ranging list of tracks that go from a salsa anthem, “De Vuelta Pa’ La Vuelta,” to an urban smash hit such as “Imposible Amor.”

In addition to Tainy and Barrera, Ovy on the Drums, Mora and Sky Rompiendo have made this year’s 10 Latin producers list after ruling the charts this year.

Billboard’s year-end music recaps represent aggregated metrics for each artist, title, label and music contributor on the weekly charts dated Nov. 21, 2020, through Nov. 13, 2021. The rankings for MRC Data-based recaps reflect equivalent album units, airplay, sales or streaming during the weeks that the titles appeared on a respective chart during the tracking year. Any activity registered before or after a title’s chart run isn’t considered in these rankings. That methodology detail, and the November-November time period, account for some of the difference between these lists and the calendar-year recaps that are independently compiled by MRC Data.

Here’s a look at the Top 10.

  1. Tainy

Bad Bunny & Jhay Cortez’s “Dákiti” — The song debuted and peaked at No. 1 on the chart dated Nov. 14, 2020. Has spent a total of 27 weeks atop the chart, 20 in 2021, the most for any Latin track.

  1. Ovy on the Drums

Karol G, Anuel AA & Bad Bunny’s “Location” — Part of her chart-topping album KG0516, this Western-inspired, country-tinged empowering anthem peaked at No. 6 on Hot Latin Songs.

  1. MORA

Anuel AA’s “Dictadura” — one of Anuel’s newest songs, the reggaeton hit peaked at No. 12 on the tally in November. The track was the first single off the singer’s new album, Las Leyendas Nunca Mueren, which launched at No. 1 on the Top Latin Albums chart (dated Dec. 11).

  1. MAG

Bad Bunny’s “Maldita Pobreza” — The alternative track may not be one of Bunny’s highest charting titles, but it is part of his history-making album El Último Tour del Mundo. On Hot Latin Songs, “Maldita Pobreza” peaked at No. 12.

  1. Sky Rompiendo

J Balvin & Sech’s “Una Nota” — In September, Balvin and Sech’s collab peaked at No. 11 on Hot Latin Songs.

  1. Edgar Barrera

Gera MX and Christian Nodal’s “Botella Tras Botella” — In May,  Nodal and newcomer Gera MX’s “Botella Tras Botella” debuted at No. 60 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (dated May 8), becoming the first regional Mexican title to enter the list in its almost 63-year history. On the Hot Latin Songs chart, the track peaked at No. 3.

  1. Mr. Naisgai

Rauw Alejandro’s “Todo De Ti” — A No. 2 peak (Sept. 11-dated tally), it’s Rauw’s highest-charting title.

  1. Albert Hype

Selena Gomez & Rauw Alejandro’s “Baila Conmigo” — One of the first single’s off Gomez’s first-ever Spanish-language album titled Revelación, the track debuted and peaked at No. 4 on the tally.

  1. Keityn

Maluma’s “Sobrio” — The reggaeton song premiered in July to a star-studded music video that has raked in more than 155 million views on YouTube. “Sobrio” peaked at No. 11 on the Hot Latin Songs chart (dated July 24).

  1. Manuel Lara

Kali Uchis’ “Telepatía” — Peaked at No. 1 on the chart dated May 22, where it remained for eight weeks. Kali Uchis became the first female soloist to reach No. 1 with a song unaccompanied by another act since Paulino Rubio did it in Feb. 2012

Camilo: The Top Winner at Latin Grammys with Four Awards

Camilo is capping off a banner year with a bang…

The 27-year-old Colombian singer/songwriter and rising star, who has defied the commercial might of reggaetón and trap with his unique brand of romantic acoustic pop, was the big winner at the 2021 Latin Grammy Awards.

Camilo
Camilo claimed four trophies, including best pop vocal album, for Mis Manos.

“This album is a celebration of my country, one of the places with the most biodiversity in the world, and that’s where I’m from and what informs my music,” said Camilo, who’d previously won a Latin Grammy in 2020 for Best Pop Song for his single “Tutu,” featuring Pedro Capo.

Following Camilo in number of wins, with three each, was Mexican songwriter and producer Edgar Barrera, who won producer of the year, including for his work on Camilo’s Mis Manos, and co-wrote the winning single “Vida de Rico.”

Also taking home three trophies was Spaniard C. Tangana, whose wins included best alternative song for “Nominao” alongside Jorge Drexler and best pop/rock song for “Hong Kong” alongside Andrés Calamaro, both from his critically acclaimed album El Madrileño.

And the emotional high note, at every level, was the song of the year win, to Cuban liberty anthem “Patria y Vida,” performed by Gente de Zona, Descemer Bueno, Yotuel Romero and newly arrived Cuban rapper El Funky, who performed dressed in white and surrounded by candles in an emotional rendition that got the audience at the MGM Grand Garden Arena to their feet.

“This is dedicated to all mothers who fight for their children,” said an emotional Romero to chants of “Patria y Vida,” which also won best urban song. Backstage, the group acknowledged co-writer Beatriz Luengo (who is married to Romero) and rapper Maykel Osorbo, who is jailed in Cuba because of his participation in the song.

“Maykel is the first Cuban political prisoner who wins two Latin Grammys,” said an emotional Bueno.

Among the veteran, but beloved, guard, the top winner was Juan Luis Guerra, with three wins. They include best long form music video for his HBO Max special Entre Mar y Palmeras, produced by Guerra’s manager Amarilys German, his son Jean Guerra, and Nelson Albareda and Edgar Martínez of event promotion and marketing firm Loud and Live.

Likewise, Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year Ruben Blades won two awards, including album of the year, for his Salswing! out on his own label. And Caetano Veloso and son Tom Veloso won record of the year for “Talvez,” while the biggest surprise of the night, in an award category that — with 10 nominees — has become increasingly hard to predict, was Colombia’s Juliana Velásquez as best new artist, which she won over far better known contenders, including Paloma Mami, Bizarrap and María Becerra.

The 23-year-old actress and singer released her self-titled debut album earlier this year with collabs alongside compatriot Juan Pablo Vega, but with little impact abroad. And yet, it clearly struck a chord with its themes of self-help, mental health and self awareness.

“I think what worked in my favor was making music that spoke directly to young people,” said Velásquez in the press room. “I think us artists have an obligation to share messages that contribute to society and to help with those issues that get lost in the a society imbued with immediacy.”

Here’s a look at this year’s Latin Grammy winners:

Record of the Year: “Talvez,” Caetano Veloso and Tom Veloso
Album of the Year: Salswing!, Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta
Song of the Year: “Patria y Vida,” Descemer Bueno, El Funky, Gente De Zona, Yadam González, Beatriz Luengo, Maykel Osorbo and Yotuel, songwriters (Yotuel, Gente De Zona, Descemer Bueno, Maykel Osorbo, El Funky)
Best New Artist: Juliana Velásquez
Best Pop Vocal Album: Mis Manos, Camilo
Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Privé, Juan Luis Guerra
Best Pop Song: “Vida De Rico,” Édgar Barrera and Camilo, songwriters (Camilo)
Best Urban Fusion/Performance: “Tattoo (Remix),” Rauw Alejandro and Camilo
Best Reggaeton Performance: “Bichota,” Karol G
Best Urban Music Album: El Último Tour Del Mundo, Bad Bunny
Best Rap/Hip Hop Song: “Booker T,” Bad Bunny and Marco Daniel Borrero, songwriters (Bad Bunny)
Best Urban Song: “Patria Y Vida,” Descemer Bueno, El Funky, Gente De Zona, Yadam González, Beatriz Luengo, Maykel Osorbo and Yotuel, songwriters (Yotuel, Gente De Zona, Descemer Bueno, Maykel Osorbo and El Funky)
Best Rock Album: El Pozo Brillante, Vicentico
Best Rock Song: “Ahora 1,” Vicentico, songwriter (Vicentico)
Best Pop/Rock Album: Origen, Juanes
Best Pop/Rock Song: “Hong Kong,” Alizzz, Andrés Calamaro, Jorge Drexler, Víctor Martínez and C. Tangana, songwriters (C. Tangana and Andrés Calamaro)
Best Alternative Music Album: Calambre, Nathy Peluso
Best Alternative Song: “Nominao,” Alizzz, Jorge Drexler and C. Tangana, songwriters (C. Tangana and Jorge Drexler)
Best Salsa Album: Salsa Plus!, Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado and Orquesta
Best Cumbia/Vallento Album: Las Locuras Mías, Silvestre Dangond
Best Merengue/Bachata Album: Es Merengue ¿Algún Problema?, Sergio Vargas
Best Traditional Tropical Album: Cha Cha Chá: Homenaje A Lo Tradicional, Alain Pérez, Issac Delgado y Orquesta Aragón
Best Contemporary Tropical Album: Brazil305, Gloria Estefan
Best Tropical Song: “Dios Así Lo Quiso,” Camilo, David Julca, Jonathan Julca, Yasmil Marrufo and Ricardo Montaner, songwriters (Ricardo Montaner and Juan Luis Guerra)
Best Singer-Songwriter Album: Seis, Mon Laferte
Best Ranchero/Mariachi Album: A Mis 80’s, Vicente Fernández
Best Banda Album: Nos Divertimos Logrando Lo Imposible, Grupo Firme
Best Tejano Album: Pa’ la Pista y Pa’l Pisto, Vol. 2, El Plan
Best Norteño Album: Al Estilo Rancherón, Los Dos Carnales & Volando Alto, Palomo
Best Regional Song: “Aquí Abajo,” Edgar Barrera, René Humberto Lau Ibarra and Christian Nodal, songwriters (Christian Nodal)
Best Instrumental Album: Toquinho e Yamandu Costa – Bachianinha – (Live at Rio Montreux Jazz Festival), Toquinho and Yamandu Costa
Best Folk Album: Ancestras, Petrona Martinez
Best Tango Album: Tinto Tango Plays Piazzolla, Tinto Tango
Best Flamenco Album: Un Nuevo Universo, Pepe De Lucía
Best Latin Jazz/Jazz Album: Voyager, Iván Melon Lewis
Best Christian Album (Spanish Language): Ya Me Vi, Aroddy
Best Portuguese Language Christian Album: Seguir Teu Coração, Anderson Freire
Best Portuguese Language Contemporary Pop Album: Cor, Anavitória
Best Portuguese Language Rock or Alternative Album: “Álbum Rosa,” A Cor Do Som
Best Samba/Pagode Album: Sempre Se Pode Sonhar, Paulinho Da Viola
Best MPB (Musica Popular Brasileira) Album: Canções d’Além Mar, Zeca Baleiro
Best Sertaneja Music Album: Tempo de Romance, Chitãozinho e Xororó
Best Portuguese Language Roots Album: Arraiá Da Veveta, Ivete Sangalo
Best Portuguese Language Song: “Lisboa,” Ana Caetano & Paulo Novaes, songwriters (Anavitória e Lenine)
Best Latin Children’s Album: Tu Rockcito Filarmónico, Tu Rockcito y Orquesta Filarmónica De Medellín
Best Classical Album: Latin American Classics, Kristhyan Benitez; Jon Feidner, album producer
Best Classical Contemporary Composition: “Music From Cuba And Spain, Sierra: Sonata Para Guitarra,” Roberto Sierra, composer (Manuel Barrueco)
Best Arrangement: “Ojalá Que Llueva Café (Versión Privé),” Juan Luis Guerra, arranger (Juan Luis Guerra)
Best Recording Package: “Colegas,” Ana Gonzalez, art director (Gilberto Santa Rosa)
Best Engineered Album: El Madrileño, Orlando Aispuro Meneses, Daniel Alanís, Alizzz, Rafa Arcaute, Josdán Luis Cohimbra Acosta, Miguel De La Vega, Máximo Espinosa Rosell, Alex Ferrer, Luis Garcié, Billy Garedella, Patrick Liotard, Ed Maverick, Beto Mendonça, Jaime Navarro, Alberto Pérez, Nathan Phillips, Harto Rodríguez, Jason Staniulis and Federico Vindver, engineers; Delbert Bowers, Alex Ferrer, Jaycen Joshua, Nineteen85, Lewis Pickett, Alex Psaroudakis and Raül Refree, mixers; Chris Athens, mastering engineer (C. Tangana) — WINNER
Producer of the Year: Edgar Barrera
Best Short Form Music Video: “Un Amor Eterno,” Marc Anthony
Best Long Form Music Video: “Entre Mar Y Palmeras,” Juan Luis Guerra

Selena Gomez Teams Up with Camilo for New Spanish Single “999”

Selena Gomez is back with new Spanish music…

The 29-year-old Mexican American singer/actress has joined voices with Colombian singer-songwriter Camilo for the new Spanish single “999.”

Selena Gomez

The new single comes after Gomez released her first Spanish-language EP Revelación in March — with which she became the first woman to debut at No. 1 on BillboardTop Latin Albums chart since 2017.

Produced by Edgar Barrera and penned by Camilo, “999” — a rhythmic pop song that is a ballad at its core — marks the first collaboration between the former Disney Channel star and Camilo.

The track, which was released alongside a music video directed by Sophie Muller, finds the two artists, with Gomez donning colorful hair, trading verses about true love over a sparse drumbeat.

“I don’t want to go slow. I know you think of me … If you want to go at 1,000, I’m at 999,” they sing.

“Camilo is a fantastic songwriter and singer who proudly wears his heart on his sleeve which is something we connected on immediately,” Gomez said about Camilo. “I couldn’t have been more excited to collaborate with him.”

“Working with Selena Gomez is a huge honor. From the beginning, ‘999’ was written with the sound of her voice in mind and would not exist if it were not created dreaming of this collaboration,” Camilo added. “I’m so excited about the opportunity it represents for me and my career, a song as precious as this, with an artist whom I respect and have followed for so long. I couldn’t believe it because just two or three years ago they asked me in an interview with whom I dreamed of making a song and my answer was, ‘with Selena Gomez’ and now it’s a reality.”

“999” follows Gomez’s seven-track Revelación released March 12 via Interscope/IGA that marked the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman since 2017. The EP featured collaborations with rising Latin acts Myke Towers and Rauw Alejandro.

“I was the most nervous I have been in a long time because my heritage means so much to me and I have been talking about doing this for over 10 years,” Gomez previously told Billboard about Revelación. “I wanted it to be perfect. I am thrilled to see the response from my fans and also from people who might not have listened to my other music.”

Most recently, Camilo collaborated with Shawn Mendes on a remix for his ultra tropical love anthem “Kesi.” He’s currently on tour in Spain.