Sony Developing “El Muerto” Marvel Character Film with Bad Bunny Attached to Star

Bad Bunny is dying for an exciting new role…

Sony Pictures, looking to continue to expand and diversify its universe of Marvel characters, is developing an El Muerto movie with the 28-year-old Puerto Rican Grammy-winning singer attached to star.

Bad BunnyThe announcement was made at Cinemacon during Sony’s panel where Bad Bunny made a surprise appearance.

The character of El Muerto, aka Juan Carlos, was a super powered wrestler who originally fought Spider-Man in a charity wrestling match in which he nearly unmasked the webslinger before being stung by Spider-Man with a paralyzing poison. After his oppressor El Dorado came to claim his life, he was saved by Spider-Man, after which the two team up to defeat Dorado.

El Muerto would mark the first Latin superhero to get his own film in the universe of Marvel characters, coming right after Sony recently dated Madame Webwhich marked the first female character from the Spider-Man universe to get her own film.

Though El Muerto isn’t as popular as Venom or Kraven the Hunter, Sony’s rush to get this film into development has much to do with Bad Bunny’s persistence in finding that right superhero property for himself.

The superstar is set to make his major studio debut in the highly-anticipated action film Bullet Train on July 29, a project that led to Aaron Taylor-Johnson landing the lead role in Kraven the Hunter. 

The same situation looks to have happened with Bad Bunny with executives extremely high on the final Bad Bunny footage from the film.

Following recent meetings to figure out a starring vehicle for him, the multi-hyphenate took matters into his own hands and began mining the Spider-Man library for Latin characters that would suit him, eventually coming across El Muerto. The studio loved the idea and hopes to move quickly on the project given Bad Bunny’s busy touring and acting schedule.

Besides Bullet Train, he was also recently seen in Narcos: Mexico and has Cassandro coming out alongside Gael García Bernal. He also recently wrapped his arena tour El Ultimo Tour Del Mundo

El Muerto will come out on Jan. 12, 2024.

Benito Antonio Marinez Ocasio (aka Bad Bunny) said working on Bullet Train was “an amazing experience. David (Leitch) is awesome. I loved working with him on my first film and now with this opportunity to bring El Muerto to life. It’s amazing, it’s incredible. I love wrestling. I grew up watching wrestling and I’m a wrestler. I’m a former champion so this is why I love this character. I think it’s the perfect role to me and it will be epic.”

Selena Gomez’s “Revelación” Debuts at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums Chart

Selena Gomez is No. 1 with a bullet…

The 28-year-old Mexican American singer/actress has debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart with her first Spanish-language album Revelación on the March 27-dated survey.

Selena Gomez

Her album arrives with 23,000 equivalent album units earned in the U.S. in the week ending March 18, according to MRC Data — marking the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman since 2017.

“I never go into anything expecting a No. 1 so I do not take it for granted,” Gomez tells Billboard. “It’s always a bit nerve racking before releasing any music because as artists we put so much of ourselves out there. For this EP specifically, I was the most nervous I have been in a long time because my heritage means so much to me and I have been talking about doing this for over 10 years. I wanted it to be perfect. I am thrilled to see the response from my fans and also from people who might not have listened to my other music.”

The Top Latin Albums chart ranks the most popular Latin albums of the week in the U.S. based on multimetric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units comprise album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). Each unit equals one album sale, or 10 individual tracks sold from an album, or 3,750 ad-supported or 1,250 paid/subscription on-demand official audio and video streams generated by songs from an album.

The seven-track Revelación was released March 12 via Interscope/IGA. Of its starting sum of 23,000 equivalent album units, album sales comprise 14,000 and the bulk of the remainder are SEA units (equaling 12.21 million on-demand streams of the set’s songs). Gomez’s debut Latin project boasts the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman in nearly four years, since Shakira’s El Dorado started with 29,000 units in its first week (chart dated June 17, 2017).

“Without a doubt the most challenging aspect was having to do all of the sessions over Zoom,” Gomez adds. “We started recording the EP right before COVID-19 shut everything down. In the beginning there were times I ended up canceling sessions because I found it so uninspiring not to be in the same room with everyone. I eventually was able to get past it and am extremely happy with how the music came together. [Producer] Tainy was very patient with me while I worked through my frustrations.”

Revelación is the first album by a female act at No. 1 on Top Latin Albums since Shakira’s El Dorado spent its fifth and final nonconsecutive week atop the list dated Aug. 5, 2017.

Gomez also notches the highest debut by a female solo act since Jenni Rivera’s Paloma Negra Desde Monterrey likewise debuted atop the list in November 2016. In between Rivera and Gomez, a collaborative set by two women launched at No. 1: Gloria Trevi and Alejandra Guzman’s Versus in July 2017.

As Gomez’s “Baila Conmigo,” with Rauw Alejandro, concurrently takes over the top spot on the new Latin Airplay chart, she becomes the first female act in over a decade to rule both charts simultaneously. The last woman to achieve the feat was Shakira when Sale el Sol and “Loca,” featuring El Cata, ruled both Top Latin Albums and Latin Airplay, respectively in November 2010.

Elsewhere, Gomez places a total of four tracks on Hot Latin Songs, all from Revelación — one of which debuts in the top 20: “Baila Conmigo” with Rauw Alejandro lifts 8-5, “Selfish Love,” with DJ Snake, is at No. 18, “Dámelo To’,” featuring Myke Towers, starts at No. 20, and “De Una Vez,” re-enters at No. 50.

“Releasing ‘De Una Vez’ as the first song was the perfect way to introduce the new music,” Gomez says. “It’s a song I really related to and I think it’s beautiful with a message of hope and healing. I think all of the collaborators bring different elements to the table. With Snake it was great because we have a history together so on a mere comfort level that was nice to have. On ‘Dámelo Tó’ Myke brings this smooth rap and it makes you crave for it to be summer because it has the kind of vibe. When we were recording ‘Baila Conmigo’ I  knew we needed a male voice on it and Rauw has the ideal sexy, soulful voice that really complements the song perfectly.”

Revelación concurrently bows at No. 1 on Latin Pop Albums and at No. 22 on the all-genre Billboard 200 chart.

Selena Returns to Top 10 on Billboard’s Latin Pop Albums Chart with “Selena: The Series” Soundtrack

Selena is back on the charts…

The late Mexican American singer, known as la Reina de la Musica Tejana, returns to Billboard’s Latin Pop Albums chart dated December 19 with her latest soundtrack Selena: The Series, Music From The Netflix’s Original Series

Selena Quintanilla

It’s Selena’s first entry and Top 10 since 2016 following the former No. 1 greatest hits compilation Lo Mejor De… (April 2016).

As Selena: The Series Soundtrack debuts at No. 8, Selena captures her sixth top 10, dating back to the 44-week ruler Dreaming of You (it debuted at No. 1 in August 1995).

Selena: The Series Soundtrack opens with 1,000 equivalent album units earned in the week ending Dec. 10, according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data, most of which stem from streaming activity. The first nine episodes of Selena: The Series premiered on Netflix on December 4.

The Latin Pop Albums chart ranks the most popular Latin pop albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units comprise album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). 

Selena:The Series soundtrack, which was released December 4 via Netflix/Capitol Latin/UMLE, net 1,000 SEA which equates to 1.2 million on-demand U.S. streams for the album’s songs in its opening week.

With The Series arriving in the current chart week, Selena also generates popularity with other efforts. Her last live set, Live, The Last Concert: Houston, Texas 1995, an April 2001 one-week chart ruler, re-enters at No. 7 after previously hitting No. 10 last holiday season.

Concurrently, Selena’s all-time favorite Ones (2002), moves closer to Shakira’s El Dorado’s 63-week No. 1 record holder, holding strong atop the list in its 61st week.

Elsewhere, The Series’s 20-track set sees six of its songs debut or re-enter the Latin Digital Song Sales chart. Let’s take a look:

Rank, Title

No. 4, “Como La Flor”
No. 8, “Baila Esta Cumbia”
No. 10, “Que Creías” (debut)
No. 19, “Besitos” (debut)
No. 21, “La Carcacha”
No. 24, “Dame Un Beso” (debut)

Natti Natasha Scores Largest Sales Week on the Latin Charts by a Solo Woman in More Than a Year

Natti Natasha’s debut album opens big…

The 32-yar-old Dominican singer and songwriter’sdebut album ilumiNATTI has launched at No. 3 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart dated March 2, scoring the largest week for a Latin album by a solo woman in more than a year and a half.

Natti Natasha

The 17-song set was released February 15 via Pina Records/Sony Music Latinand opens with 7,000 equivalent album units earned in the week ending February 21, according to Nielsen Music

Of that sum, a little over 3,000 were in album sales, while most of the remaining units were generated by streaming activity (equaling 3.9 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs during the week).

ilumiNATTIis Natti’s first studio effort and first entry on the tally.

The last album by a woman to post a larger week, in terms of units, was Shakira’s El Dorado, which tallied a little more than 7,000 units at No. 1 on the July 15, 2017-dated list (the set’s fifth week on the chart). One week later, a pair of women teamed up for a larger frame, when Gloria Treviand Alejandra Guzman’s Versus bowed at No. 1 with 8,000 units.

ilumiNATTI’s sales start of 3,000, lands the album a No. 1 bow on the Latin Album Saleschart.

Beyond its Top Latin Albums top 10 start, ilumiNATTIalso bows at No. 3 on the Latin Rhythm Albumschart.

Two songs from the album are generating chart action: “Me Gusta” ascends 30-26 with the Digital Greatest Gainerhonors on the Hot Latin Songschart, which blends airplay, digital sales and streaming data, while “La Mejor Versión de Mi” debuts at No. 41 on the current tracking week.

Luis Fonsi’s “Vida” Debuts at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums Chart

Luis Fonsiis celebrating his vida’s success…

The 40-year-old Puerto Rican singer is back at the top of Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart after nearly eight years. 

Luis Fonsi

He debuts at No. 1 on the list dated February 16 with his 10th studio album Vida, earning him his third No. 1 and first since Tierra Firmespent three consecutive weeks at No. 1 in July 2011.

Vida, which was released February 1 via Universal Music Latino/UMLE, opens with 22,000 equivalent album units earned in the week ending February 7, according to Nielsen Music, with 16,000 of those comprising album sales. 

Vida earns the biggest week for a Latin pop album since Shakira‘s El Doradolaunched at No. 2 with 29,000 units on the June 24, 2017-dated tally. 

Vida also logs the biggest sales week for any Latin album since Romeo Santos’ Goldenbowed with 26,000 in its premiere frame (August 12, 2017).

Vidais the culmination of many achieved dreams and goals,” Luis Fonsi tells Billboard.“The celebration of being alive and breaking boundaries through music. I thank each and every one who collaborated in this project, and above all, I thank my audience deeply for being part of my life.”

Vida’s first week was boosted by sales at Fonsi’s shows in Dallas (February 4) and San Diego (February 5), where CDs were available to purchase at merch stands at the venue. Luis Fonsi also generated sales alongside a performance at The Mall of San Juanin Puerto Rico (February 2) and an appearance at the Mayagüez Mall(February 3) in Mayagüez, also in Puerto Rico.

Concurrently, Vidadebuts at No. 18 on the Billboard 200chart; his second-highest-charting album ever, behind only 2008’s Palabras de Silencio (which debuted and peaked at No. 15 on September 13, 2008). Vidaalso notches the highest debut by a Latin album since Ozuna’s Aura(No. 7, September 8, 2018).

Shakira’s “Waka Waka (This Time For Africa)” Video Surpasses Two Billion Views on YouTube

Shakira has another two billion reasons to celebrate…

The 41-year-old Colombian superstar’s “Waka Waka (This Time For Africa)” music video has surpassed two billion views on YouTube.

Shakira

Shakira, who is currently crossing the U.S. on her El Dorado Tour, shared the news with her fans on Instagram. “Incredible,” she wrote.

The “Waka Waka” clip is Shak’s second video to reach the milestone, following “Chantaje” with Maluma, which hit the two-billion mark earlier this year.

On the Billboard charts, Shakira’s “Waka Waka (This Time For Africa)” featuring Freshlyground peaked at No. 38 on the July 3, 2010-dated BillboardHot 100 chart. It spent a total of 18 weeks on the chart.

“Waka Waka” was the official 2010 FIFA World Cup song.

Bruno Mars Wins Six Grammys, Including Album, Record & Song of the Year

It’s a (24K) magical time for Bruno Mars

The 32-year-old part-Puerto Rican singer-songwriter was the big winner at Sunday night’s Grammy Awards, picking up six gramophones.

Bruno Mars

It was a clean sweep for Mars, who’d previously won five Grammys since 2011, including wins in the three major categories.

Mars took home his first Album of the Year award for his own work, his hit album 24K Magic, thereby denying rappers Kendrick Lamar and Jay-Z the honor of becoming the first hip-hop artist in 14 years to win the coveted album of the year.

Additionally, he took home the award for song of the year for his hit single “That’s What I Like,” and record of the year for “24K Magic.”

“Don’t cut me off Grammys, please,” said Mars from the stage while accepting the last award of the night. Recounting his early days as a young performer entertaining tourists in his native Hawaii, Mars name-checked writer-producers Babyface, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and Teddy Riley as key influences.

Shakira picked up the third Grammy of her career…

The 40-year-old Colombian superstar took home the award for Best Latin Pop Album for his critically acclaimed album El Dorado.

Residente picked up the first Grammy of his career as a solo artist.

The 39-year-old Puerto Rican rapper, who’d previously won two Grammys and a slew of Latin Grammys as a member of Calle 13, took home the award for Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album for his self-titled album.

Lin-Manuel Miranda picked up his third Grammy.

The 38-year-old composer, lyricist, playwright, and actor won the award for Best Song Written for Visual Media for his single from Disney’s Moana soundtrack, “How Far I’ll Go.”

Other Latino winners include Aida Cuevas for Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) and Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta for Best Tropical Latin Album.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Album of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Record of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Song of the Year: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best New Artist: Alessia Cara

Best Pop Solo Performance: “Shape of You” — Ed Sheeran

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: “Feel It Still” — Portugal. The Man

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” — Various Artists; Dae Bennett, producer

Best Pop Vocal Album: “÷” — Ed Sheeran

Best Dance Recording: “Tonite” — LCD Soundsystem

Best Dance/Electronic Album: “3-D The Catalogue” — Kraftwerk

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Prototype” — Jeff Lorber Fusion

Best Rock Performance: “You Want It Darker” — Leonard Cohen

Best Metal Performance: “Sultan’s Curse” — Mastodon

Best Rock Song: “Run” — Foo Fighters, songwriters

Best Rock Album: “A Deeper Understanding” — The War on Drugs

Best Alternative Music Album: “Sleep Well Beast” — The National

Best R&B Performance: “That’s What I Like” — Bruno Mars

Best Traditional R&B Performance: “Redbone” — Childish Gambino

Best R&B Song: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best Urban Contemporary Album: “Starboy” — The Weeknd

Best R&B Album: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Best Rap Performance: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Rap/Sung Performance: “LOYALTY.” — Kendrick Lamar featuring Rihanna

Best Rap Song: “HUMBLE.” — K. Duckworth, Asheton Hogan and M. Williams II, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

Best Rap Album: “DAMN.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Country Solo Performance: “Either Way” — Chris Stapleton

Best Country Duo/Group Performance: “Better Man” — Little Big Town

Best Country Song: “Broken Halos” — Mike Henderson and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

Best Country Album: “From a Room: Volume 1” — Chris Stapleton

Best New Age Album: “Dancing on Water” — Peter Kater

Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Miles Beyond” — John McLaughlin, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album: “Dreams and Daggers” — Cécile McLorin Salvant

Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Rebirth” — Billy Childs

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Bringin’ It” — Christian McBride Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album: “Jazz Tango” — Pablo Ziegler Trio

Best Gospel Performance/Song: “Never Have to Be Alone” — CeCe Winans; Dwan Hill & Alvin Love III, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song: “What a Beautiful Name” — Hillsong Worship; Ben Fielding & Brooke Ligertwood, songwriters

Best Gospel Album: “Let Them Fall in Love” — CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: “Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams

Best Roots Gospel Album: “Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope” — Reba McEntire

Best Latin Pop Album: “El Dorado” — Shakira

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album: “Residente” — Residente

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano): “Arriero Somos Versiones Acústicas” — Aida Cuevas

Best Tropical Latin Album: “Salsa Big Band” — Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance: “Killer Diller Blues” — Alabama Shakes

Best American Roots Song: “If We Were Vampires” — Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit)

Best Americana Album: “The Nashville Sound” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Best Bluegrass Album: tie, “Laws of Gravity” — The Infamous Stringdusters and “All the Rage — In Concert Volume One” — Rhonda Vincent and the Rage

Best Traditional Blues Album: “Blue & Lonesome” — The Rolling Stones

Best Contemporary Blues Album: “TajMo” — Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’

Best Folk Album: “Mental Illness” — Aimee Mann

Best Regional Roots Music Album: “Kalenda” — Lost Bayou Ramblers

Best Reggae Album: “Stony Hill” — Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

Best World Music Album: “Shaka Zulu Revisited: 30th Anniversary Celebration” — Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Best Children’s Album: “Feel What U Feel” — Lisa Loeb

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling): “The Princess Diarist” — Carrie Fisher

Best Comedy Album: “The Age of Spin/Deep in the Heart of Texas” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album: “Dear Evan Hansen” — Ben Platt, principal soloist; Alex Lacamoire, Stacey Mindich, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, producers; Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, composers/lyricists (original Broadway cast recording)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Various Artists

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Justin Hurwitz, composer

Best Song Written for Visual Media: “How Far I’ll Go” — Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Auli’i Cravalho)

Best Instrumental Composition: “Three Revolutions” — Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: “Escapades for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra From ‘Catch Me If You Can’” — John Williams, arranger (John Williams)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals: “Putin” — Randy Newman, arranger (Randy Newman)

Best Recording Package: tie, “Pure Comedy (Deluxe Edition)” — Sasha Barr, Ed Steed and Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) and “El Orisha de la Rosa” — Claudio Roncoli and Cactus Taller, art directors (Magín Díaz)

Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package: “The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition” — Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly and David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Album Notes: “Live at the Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings” — Lynell George, writer (Otis Redding)

Best Historical Album: “Leonard Bernstein — The Composer” — Robert Russ, compilation producer; Martin Kistner and Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Leonard Bernstein)

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “24K Magic” — Serban Ghenea, John Hanes and Charles Moniz, engineers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer (Bruno Mars)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Greg Kurstin

Best Remixed Recording: “You Move (Latroit Remix)” — Dennis White, remixer (Depeche Mode)

Best Surround Sound Album: “Early Americans” — Jim Anderson, surround mix engineer; Darcy Proper, surround mastering engineer; Jim Anderson and Jane Ira Bloom, surround producers (Jane Ira Bloom)

Best Engineered Album, Classical: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Mark Donahue, engineer (Manfred Honeck and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Producer of the Year, Classical: David Frost

Best Orchestral Performance: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording: “Berg: Wozzeck” — Hans Graf, conductor; Anne Schwanewilms and Roman Trekel; Hans Graf and Brad Sayles, producers (Houston Symphony; Chorus of Students and Alumni, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University and Houston Grand Opera Children’s Chorus)

Best Choral Performance: “Bryars: The Fifth Century” — Donald Nally, conductor (PRISM Quartet and The Crossing)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance: “Death & the Maiden” — Patricia Kopatchinskaja and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Best Classical Instrumental Solo: “Transcendental” — Daniil Trifonov

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album: “Crazy Girl Crazy” — Barbara Hannigan (Ludwig Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium: “Higdon: All Things Majestic, Viola Concerto & Oboe Concerto” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition: “Viola Concerto” — Jennifer Higdon, composer (Roberto Díaz, Giancarlo Guerrero and Nashville Symphony)

Best Music Video: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Music Film: “The Defiant Ones” — Various Artists

Shakira Announces New El Dorado World Tour Dates

Shakira is hitting the road again…

After announcing the cancellation of her European tour due to strained vocals, the 40-year-old Colombian superstar has reappeared on social media to announce the new dates for El Dorado World Tour.

“I wanted to write one more letter to express my gratitude to all of you for the immeasurable love and support that you have sent me these past few weeks,” Shakira wrote. “Thankfully, I am so relieved and happy to share with you that I will be getting back on the road in June 2018 with my El Dorado World Tour in Europe, and the US, with Latin America dates to be announced soon.”

Shakira’s tour has been completely rescheduled, and now will start on June 5 in Cologne, Germany.

The “Perro Fiel” singer also announced the new dates for the tour’s U.S. leg, which was supposed to start in January. The new dates have been set to begin on August 5 in Chicago, IL and will visit 18 other cities, including Miami, Los Angeles, New York, Dallas and Las Vegas.

For the full schedule click here.

To wrap up the much-anticipated news, Shakira added: “I promise to give you all of me and more from the minute I get on that stage and I am counting the days till showtime!”

To read Shakira’s letter, click here.