Manuel Abud Named New CEO of The Latin Recording Academy

Manuel Abud is movin’ on up…

The Board of Trustees of The Latin Recording Academy has appointed the Mexican executive as CEO of the organization effective August 1 as part of its 10-year strategic plan.

Manuel Abud

Outgoing President/CEO Gabriel Abaroa, Jr. will become President Emeritus, a senior advisory role that will include working on assigned strategic projects while assisting the new chief executive officer in the transition.

“I am delighted to have led a succession plan that was designed with professionalism, respect, love and consistency,” said the organization’s Chairman of the Board Eduardo Hütt. “Several candidates were considered to replace Gabriel’s unique leadership style, and we agreed that Manuel Abud meets the established criteria, excelling in ways that guarantee our organization the leadership required to accomplish its goals over the next decade. The plan was carefully executed, and Manuel was groomed over an extended period.”

“We achieved tremendous progress and growth over the past two decades. I’m eager to transition to a new role that won’t be as time consuming and certain that Manuel will take us boldly into our next chapter,” said Abaroa.

“I am honored to have the opportunity to lead The Latin Recording Academy,” said Abud. “Before coming here in 2019, I had long admired the organization’s excellence, and I look forward to building on its rich heritage of supporting and honoring Latin music and ushering in a new era of growth and impact.”

“This is a wonderfully executed succession plan,” said Harvey Mason Jr., Chair & Interim President/CEO of the Recording Academy. “Having Manuel in the role of COO for two years, where he oversaw the day-to-day operation of the organization was invaluable in equipping him to lead it now. Manuel is a seasoned executive with an excellent background in content development, distribution and international markets. As he takes the reins, he will benefit from Gabriel’s tenure, continued presence and unrivaled passion for this organization.”

While COO of the Latin Academy, Abud successfully led a major reorganization, maximizing efficiencies and accelerating digital content development. In addition, he developed strong and clear positioning for the organization, leveraging its heritage and plans.

Abud will lead a seasoned executive team that includes Luis Dousdebes, Chief Awards, Membership and Preservation Officer and a 20-year veteran at The Latin Academy; Javier Aguirre, Chief Financial Officer; Davina Aryeh, Chief Business Development Officer; Laura Dergal, Vice President of Marketing and Content Development; Iveliesse Malavé, Vice President of Communications; and Aida Scorza, Senior Vice President of Awards, who has served both the Recording Academy and The Latin Recording Academy for more than 30 years.

Tanya Ramos-Puig, who was appointed President of the Latin Grammy Cultural Foundation in April, will continue reporting to both the Board of the Foundation and the CEO of The Latin Academy.

Joan Baez Among This Year’s Recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors

Joan Baez is set to receive a special honor in Our Nation’s Capital.

The 80-year-old half-Mexican American contemporary folk singer has been selected to receive the 43rd Kennedy Center Honors alongside Garth Brooks, violinist Midori, choreographer Debbie Allen and the ageless Dick Van Dyke.

Joan Baez

“It has been my life’s joy to make art,” said Baez in a statement. It’s also been my life’s joy to make, as the late Congressman John Lewis called it, ‘good trouble.’ What luck to have been born with the ability to do both; each one giving strength and credibility to the other.”

Traditionally held in December, the 2020 edition of the Kennedy Center Honors was postponed to May 2021 due to the ongoing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Live events and filming are planned for the week of May 17-22. The Honors Gala will be recorded for broadcast on CBS as a two-hour primetime special that will air on June 6 at 9:00 pm ET/PT.

But the pandemic will have an impact on how the event is staged, with live-filmed tributes and virtual moments to take the place of the traditional event in a packed Kennedy Center Opera House.

“The center’s entire campus will come alive with small, in-person events and re-envisioned virtual tributes. Featuring multiple events for physically-distant audiences in locations across the Kennedy Center’s campus…Programs for each event will encompass both performances and speaking tributes for the honorees,” according to a statement. “Virtual events will also be held throughout the week beginning May 17, and the viability of additional in-person events will be considered as COVID-19 safety protocols evolve over the upcoming months…An honoree medallion ceremony for the honorees and a limited audience will be hosted by the Kennedy Center during [the week of] May 17–22.”

Joan Baez

President-elect Joe Biden is expected to attend the Honors Gala, as presidents traditionally have done (barring a national crisis). Donald Trump was the first president to decline the invitation every year of his term.

This is the first time in five years that a majority of the honorees have been women. Carole King, Rita Moreno and Cicely Tyson were three of the five honorees in 2015.

“The Kennedy Center Honors serves as a moment to celebrate the remarkable artists who have spent their lives elevating the cultural history of our nation and world,” said David M. Rubenstein, Kennedy Center Chairman.

Here’s a look at each of this year’s honorees:

Joan Baez: The folk legend had three top 10 albums on the Billboard 200 in the 1960s, including Farewell, Angelina. Her classic version of Robbie Robertson’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1971. Baez was just 21 when she made the cover of Time in November 1962. Baez has one of the longest spans of Grammy nominations in history, from 1962 to 2018. She has yet to win a Grammy in competition (despite nine nods), but she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Recording Academy in 2007.

Garth Brooks: The country star, 58, is one of the best-selling recording artists in history. The RIAA lists him second only to The Beatles, with 157 million albums sold in the U.S. (compared to 183 million for the Fab Four). He has had nine No. 1 albums on the Billboard 200, including Ropin’ the Wind, which topped the chart for 18 weeks, still the record for a country album. Brooks has amassed 14 CMA Awards, including a record seven awards for entertainer of the year. He was artist of the decade for the 1990s at the ACM Awards. He has won two Grammys. He received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song last year. He made the cover of Time in 1992 in a story headlined “Country’s Big Boom.”

Midori: The Japanese-born American violinist, 49, was just 19 when she received her first (and to date only) Grammy nomination for best classical performance, instrumental soloist (without orchestra) for the album Paganini: 24 Caprices For Solo Violin Op. 1. She made her debut with the New York Philharmonic at age 11 as a surprise guest soloist at the New Year’s Eve Gala in 1982. 

Dick Van Dyke: The actor, 95, won three Emmys for The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-66), which is widely regarded as the granddaddy of smart, sophisticated sitcoms. He also won an Emmy in 1977 for Van Dyke & Company, which took outstanding variety or music series. He was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1995. He won a Tony in 1961 for Bye, Bye Birdie (in which he introduced the jaunty “Put on a Happy Face”) and a Grammy for 1964’s Mary Poppins (in which he took the lead in singing the Oscar-winning “Chim Chim Cher-ee”).

Debbie Allen: The actress, dancer, choreographer, singer-songwriter, director and producer, 70, has won three Emmys for choreography: two for Fame and one for Motown 30: What’s Goin’ On. She also received two Tony nods for acting in revivals of West Side Story (1980) and Sweet Charity (1986). She is a former member of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

Recording Academy Adds Two Linda Ronstadt Albums to Grammy Hall of Fame, Including “Canciones de Mi Padre”

Linda Ronstadt is pulling a double…

The Recording Academy has announced 29 songs and albums that it’ll add to the Grammy Hall of Fame, with the 74-year-old half-Mexican American singer landing two albums on the list.

Linda Ronstadt

Ronstadt’s Spanish-language album Canciones de Mi Padre, released in 1987, has earned a place in the Grammy Hall.

Ronstadt’s first album of Mexican traditional Mariachi music immediately became a global smash. It sold 2.5 million copies in the U.S. and has been RIAA certified double-platinum. It won Ronstadt the Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album at the 31st Grammy Awards.

Canciones de Mi Padre

Ronstadt was also recognized for Triothe country album she made with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris. It was also released in 1987.

The album has sold over 4 million copies worldwide and has also received several accolades, including the Grammy for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

Trio, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris

The Grammy Hall now includes 1,142 recordings.

“We are proud to announce this year’s diverse roster of Grammy Hall of Fame inductees and to recognize recordings that have shaped our industry and inspires music makers of tomorrow,” Harvey Mason Jr., chair and interim president/CEO of the Recording Academy, said in a statement. “Each recording has had a significant impact on our culture, and it is an honor to add them to our distinguished catalog.”

Here’s the full list of 2021 Grammy Hall of Fame inductees:

“Au Clair de la Lune,” Edouard-Leon Scott De Martinville, single (c. 1853-61)
“Blues Breakers,” John Mayall with Eric Clapton, album  (1966)
Canciones de Mi Padre,” Linda Ronstadt, album (1987)
“Clean Up Woman,” Betty Wright, single (1971)
“Copenhagen,” Fletcher Henderson And His Orchestra, single (1924)
“Don’t Stop Believin’,” Journey, single (1981)
“Freight Train,” Elizabeth Cotton, single (1958)
“Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.,” Bruce Springsteen, album (1973)
“Horses,” Patti Smith, album (1975)
“Hot Buttered Soul,” Isaac Hayes, album (1969)
“In the Right Place,” Dr. John, album (1973)
“Licensed to Ill,” Beastie Boys, album (1986)
“Mad Dogs & Englishmen,” Joe Cocker, album (1970)
“Mercy, Mercy, Mercy! Live at ‘The Club’,” The Cannonball Adderley Quintet, album (1966)
“Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major,” Leonard Bernstein with the Philharmonia Orchestra Of London, album (1948)
“Schoenberg: The Four String Quartets,” Kolisch String Quartet, album (1937)
“So,” Peter Gabriel, album (1986)
“Solitude,” Billie Holiday, single (1952)
“Ten,” Pearl Jam, album (1991)
“Texas Flood,” Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble, album (1983)
“The Cars,” The Cars, album (1978)
“The Gambler,” Kenny Rogers, single (1978)
“The Low End Theory,” A Tribe Called Quest, album (1991)
“Time Is On My Side,” Irma Thomas, single (1964)
Trio,” Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, album (1987)
“We Are The World,” USA For Africa, single (1985)
“When the Levee Breaks,” Kansas Joe And Memphis Minnie, single (1929)
“Wreck of the Old 97,” Vernon Dalhart, single (1924)
“Y.M.C.A.,” Village People, single (1978)

Selena to Receive the Recording Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award

There’s no denying Selena’s life, cut too short, has left a lasting impression on the world. And, now the music industry’s learned academy is celebrating her impact.

The late Mexican-American singer, known as la Reina de la Musica Tejana, is among the six artists selected by the Recording Academy to receive 2021 Lifetime Achievement Awards.

Selena Quintanilla

Selena, who was shot and killed on March 31, 1995, 16 days before her 24th birthday, by her friend and the former manager of her Selena Etc. boutiques, received two Grammy nominations in 1993-94. She won the 1993 award for best Mexican American album for Live, marking the first time a female Tejano artist had won in the category.

Selena ranks among the most influential Latin artists of all time and is credited for catapulting a music genre into the mainstream market. She has sold around 30 million records worldwide, making her one of the best-selling female artists in Latin music.

This year’s other lifetime achievement award recipients include Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five, Salt-N-Pepa, Talking Heads, Marilyn Horne and Lionel Hampton.

The honorees will be recognized on the 63rd annual Grammy Awards on January 31, and at greater length subsequently. For the last five years, the Special Merit Awards honorees were saluted on a PBS special, Grammy Salute to Music Legends.

“As we welcome the new class of Special Merit Award honorees, it gives us a chance to reward and recognize the influence they’ve had in the music community regardless of genre,” Harvey Mason Jr., chair and interim president/CEO of the Recording Academy, said in a statement.

Here’s a detailed look at this year’s honorees:

Lifetime Achievement Awards:

Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five: The group was formed in the South Bronx in 1978. The group, which was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007, consisted of Grandmaster Flash, Melle Mel, The Kidd Creole, Keef Cowboy, Mr. Ness/Scorpio and Rahiem. The group was praised for its use of turntablism, break-beat deejaying, choreographed stage routines, and lyricism. The group’s 1982 classic “The Message” was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2012.

Lionel Hampton: The jazz musician started his career as a drummer in Chicago in the 1920s before he played the vibraphone with Louis Armstrong. In the 1930s, he broke barriers with the Benny Goodman Quartet, one of America’s first integrated jazz bands. In the 1940s, he formed his own Lionel Hampton Orchestra, which became one of the longest running orchestras in jazz history. Hampton received five Grammy nominations between 1984 and 1991, but he never won. He received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1992. Hampton and his Orchestra’s 1942 classic “Flying Home” was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1996.  Hampton died in 2002 at age 94.

Marilyn Horne: The opera star, 86, received four Grammys, including the 1964 award for most promising new classical recording artist. (She has now officially fulfilled that promise!) Horne received 15 Grammy nominations between 1964 and 1993. She received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1995.

Salt-N-Pepa: The trio, consisting of Salt (Cheryl James), Pepa (Sandra Denton) and DJ Spinderella (Deidra Roper), was one of the first all-female rap ensembles. Formed in Queens, New York, in 1985, the group crafted hits such as “Push It,” “Shoop” and “Whatta Man.” The group received five Grammy nominations between 1988 and 1996. It won the 1994 award for best rap performance by a duo or group for “None Of Your Business.”

Selena: The Tejano queen received two Grammy nominations in 1993-94. She won the 1993 award for best Mexican American album for Live, marking the first time a female Tejano artist had won in the category. Selena was just 23 when she was shot to death in 1995.

Talking Heads: The group, formed in 1975 in New York City, helped to pioneer new wave by blending elements of punk, rock, art pop, funk, and world music with an avant-garde aesthetic. The group received two Grammy nominations (in 1983 and 88), but never won. Group member David Byrne went on to win a Grammy and an Oscar on his own for co-scoring The Last Emperor. Byrne also made the cover of TIME in October 1986 in a story titled “Rock’s Renaissance Man.” The other group members were Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz and Jerry Harrison. In 2002, 11 years after the group disbanded, they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Claudia Brant Returning to Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Claudia Brant’s music will have a broader audience…

The 51-year-old Argentine singer-songwriter has signed a global publishing administration agreement with Sony/ATV Music Publishing.

Claudia Brant

Brant, whose credits include Luis Fonsi’s “No me doy por vencido” and Ricky Martin’s “Lo mejor de mi vida eres tu,” is one of a few prominent female songwriters in Latin music.

She returns to Sony/ATV after a stint at Universal Music Publishing Group.

“With over two thousand songs recorded, multiple awards, and 30 years of my life dedicated to songwriting, it’s clear to me now that Sony/ATV is where I belong,” said Brant in a statement.  “It is my honor to be a part of this publishing powerhouse where songwriters are not only heard and understood but respected and taken care of. I am looking forward to getting back to work with my friend Jorge Mejia, whose hard work and dedication has greatly impacted my career. Moreover, I am thrilled to find new opportunities for my music under the guidance of the amazing Jon Platt and his team, both in the United States as well as internationally. I’m so glad to finally be back home.”

Brant has songwriting credits with many of Latin music’s biggest stars and beyond, including Camila CabelloFifth HarmonyReikIl Volo and CNCO

She was also inducted into the Latin Songwriter’s Hall of Famein 2016 and is a National Trustee board member for The Recording Academy. She won a Grammy award for Best Latin Pop Album in 2019.

Her deal with Sony/ATV encompasses her prior catalog with the publisher.

Most recently, she created “Canción de Autor Oficial,” a non-profit whose aim is to promote songwriters’ craft and rights. The organization teamed up with MusiCares for a live event concert series to raise money for the COVID-19 relief fund.

Jorge Mejia, Sony/ATV president and CEO for Latin America and US Latin said in a statement: “I have known and worked with Claudia for years, and I couldn’t admire her more for the uncommon dedication, commitment, and respect she brings to her craft. She is the consummate songwriter (not to mention mother, artist, songwriter advocate, the list goes on). Sony/ATV is lucky to be able to welcome her back home.”

Francisca Valenzuela to Take Part in the Grammy Museum’s Mentorship Monday Program

Francisca Valenzuela will be your guide…

The 33-year-old Chilean American singer, poet and multi-instrumentalist will take part in the Grammy Museum’s new Mentorship Monday program in partnership with Grammy U and former First Lady Michelle Obama‘s Reach Higher initiative.

Francisca Valenzuela

Every Monday beginning next week through August 31, top-tier music industry professionals like Valenzuela will mentor college students and recent graduates via digital conferencing. 

In addition to Valenzuela, mentors include artists Sam FischerTikyra “TK” JacksonLedisi, three-time Grammy winners Little Big TownMelanie Pfirrman and Sasha Sloan, as well as Recording Academy members. 

The sessions will give students an opportunity to connect with established music industry professionals and creatives, and will serve as a valuable tool for information, advice and exploration within a wide variety of music careers and topics as they pursue their own careers.

“The Grammy Museum’s new Mentorship Monday program exemplifies the Museum’s mission to uphold music’s value in our lives through education and collaboration between professionals and aspiring creatives,” said Michael Sticka, president of the Grammy Museum. “I’d like to thank Reach Higher and Grammy U for helping make this program a reality.”

“Reach Higher is excited to partner with the Grammy Museum to bring mentorship to students this summer.” said Eric Waldo, Executive Director of Reach Higher. “Music helps us hear each other more fully and to share ourselves with one another authentically. Now more than ever is a wonderful time for professionals and artists to harness the unifying and uplifting power of music to support students as they explore and pursue educational and career opportunities in all facets of the recording industry,”

While the sessions are currently invitation-only, a selection will be released in the future as part of Reach Higher’s Beating the Odds Summit, and a selection of public-facing mentorship sessions will be available via Instagram Live.

 Valenzuela released her latest album, La Fortaleza, in January.The album consists of 14 tracks, including the singles “Tómame,” “Héroe” and “Flotando.”

Ozuna Among 2,321 People Invited to Join the Recording Academy

Ozunahas received a special invitation…

The 28-year-old Puerto Rican reggaetonand Latin trap singer is among the 2,321 people who’ve been invited to join the Recording Academy.

Ozuna

This year’s “freshman class,” as the academy calls it, is 48% female (compared to 49% in last year’s freshman class invites), 21% African American/African descent (compared to 26%), 8% Hispanic (compared to 7%), 3% Asian American/Pacific Islander/Asian (same as last year) and 51% people who are age 39 or younger (same as last year).

Some of those invited didn’t disclose their demographic details. On gender, 3% did not disclose. On ethnicity, 13% didn’t disclose. On age, a whopping 25% didn’t disclose.

Women account for 26% of the academy’s overall membership, not just the freshman class (same as last year). People from traditionally-underrepresented communities account for 25%, up a point from last year’s 24%. People who are age 39 or younger account for 25%, down from 29% last year.

According to the academy, 79% of this year’s freshman class is being invited as potential voting members, the other 21% as (non-voting) professional members.

Laura Segura, the executive director of MusiCares, said last year that it’ll become harder and harder for the Recording 

Academy to find qualified new members to invite unless the music industry extends more opportunities to women and people of color. 

“We will face challenges with future new member classes if not enough women and people of color are being hired, mentored and have access to opportunities to lead and excel,” she said.

The Academy also created a 90-minute video, “Your Academy: Welcoming the 2020 New Member Class,” in which both current members, like John Legend and Yolanda Adams, and 2020 invitees, including Ozuna, discuss membership. 

The discussion, held on Zoom on June 24, was moderated by Justin JosephGrammy.com editor-in-chief. The roundtable debuted today on GRAMMY.com.

In order to participate in the process for the upcoming Grammy Awards, prospective new members have to accept their invitations by September 15. 

The 63rd Grammy Awards are scheduled to take place on January 31, 2021, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

More information on the Recording Academy’s membership process and requirements can be found here. Full details surrounding the new class can be found here.

Angela Aguilar Releases Cover of Lady Gaga/Bradley Cooper’s “Shallow” as Part of Grammy Reimagines Series

Angela Aguilar has found herself deep in the shallow…

The 15-year-old Mexican-American singeris the latest artist to join the Recording Academy’s Grammy ReImagines video series. 

Angela Aguilar

With her crisp, sweet voice and white-painted fingernails tapping the piano, the Latin Grammy nominee performs an enchanting version of Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s “Shallow” from A Star Is Born.

A new installment of the series, featuring artists like, COASTCITYMadison Beer and La Santa Cecilia, aims to bring a fresh take on classic Grammy-winning/nominated songs by their favorite artists.

In March, “Shallow” blasted from No. 21 to No. 1 for its first week atop the Billboard Hot 100 songs chart, becoming Lady Gaga’s fourth Hot 100No. 1 and Cooper’s first. 

The 2018 song won best pop/duo group performance and best song written for visual media at the 61st Grammy Awards in February. Aguilar, the daughter of Pepe Aguilar, has been nominated for a Grammy Award and two Latin Grammy Awards, becoming one of the youngest artists nominated for both awards

Rep. Linda Sánchez Named to the New Congress’ Recording Arts and Sciences Caucus

Linda Sánchez is ready to face the music and arts…

The 50-year-old Mexican American politician, the U.S. Representative for California’s 38th congressional district, will be part of the new Congress’ Recording Arts and Sciences Caucus.

Linda Sánchez

The bi-partisan caucus was established in 2005 and works with members of the music industry to understand sector economic and cultural impact on legislation. 

Sánchez joins a caucus that includeschairs House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA.). 

Other members of the caucus for the 116th Congressinclude Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), Julia Brownley (D-Calif.), Ken Buck (R-Colo.), Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.), Judy Chu (D-Calif.), Doug Collins (R-Ga.), Lou Correa (D-Calif.), Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), Michael McCaul (R-Texas), Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Martha Roby (R-Ala.), and Adam Schiff (D-Calif.). 

“The 116th Congress began on a strong tailwind for music policy issues, and the robust, bipartisan membership of this caucus demonstrates a continued focus on music policy,” said Daryl P. Friedman, chief industry, government, & member relations officer for the Recording Academy, in a statement. “Recording Academymembers look forward to working with the entire caucus to ensure that creatorsʹ voices continue to be heard on issues that affect them as well as the next generation of music creators.”

Last year, music advocates in Congress helped push the monumental Music Modernization Actinto law. Over the past 14 years, caucus members have met with artists including Band PerryKelly ClarksonBrenda Leeand Slash, along with other singers, songwriters, producers and engineers to discuss how current laws impact their work and music’s role in policy decision-making. 

Cardi B & Bruno Mars to Perform “Finesse (Remix)” at This Year’s Grammy Awards Show

Cardi B is ready to make her Grammys debut…

The 25-year-old part-Dominican rapper will partner with Bruno Mars to bring their “Finesse (Remix)” to the Grammy stage when the 60th Annual awards come back to New York City on Sunday January 28.

Cardi B & Bruno Mars

Along with Mars and Cardi B, the Recording Academy revealed that 2018 Grammy nominees Luis Fonsi & Daddy YankeeKesha, and SZA will also join the roster.

In addition, Alessia Cara, Khalid and Logic will join voices for a performance, taking the stage with a group of suicide attempt and loss survivors in a special performance of “1-800-273-8255.”

Previously announced performers include Childish Gambino, Lady Gaga, Little Big Town, Patti LuPone, P!nk, and Ben Platt.

Mars, who is the third most nominated artist of the night after JAY Z and Kendrick Lamar, has earned six nominations including album of the year and best R&B album for 24K Magic as well as record of the year for “24K Magic” and song of the year for “That’s What I Like.”

Cardi B, who will make her Grammy debut this year, received two nods for “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)” (best rap performance and best rap song).

Current three-time Grammy nominees Fonsi & Daddy Yankee are up for record of the year, song of the year, and best pop duo/group performance (“Despacito” featuring Justin Bieber) after winning big at the Latin Grammys back in November 2017.

The show will be hosted by award-winning television personality and performer James Corden and will be broadcasted live on CBS at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT.