Natalia LaFourcade Among the Top Winners at This Year’s Latin Grammys

Natalia LaFourcade has her hands full…

The 36-year-old Mexican singer-songwriter proved to be one of the night’s big winners at the Latin Grammys awards show, taking home three prizes, including one of the top awards.

Natalia Lafourcade

LaFourcade, a Grammy and Latin Grammy darling, was nevertheless a surprise winner in the Album of the Year category with her Un Canto Por México, Vol. 1, a collection of songs dedicated to Mexico and arranged in traditional style.

LaFourcade also won best regional song for “Mi Religión” and best alternative song for “En Cantos,” alongside Ile and co-written with Ismael Cancel.

LaFourcade now raises her total of Latin Grammy wins to 14 after winning in every category she was nominated this year.

But she wasn’t the only top winner of the night…

Rosalía also took home three awards.

The 27-year-old Spanish singer won those awards due to two collaborations. “Yo x Ti Tu x Mi,” with Puerto Rican star Ozuna, won best urban fusion performance and best urban song, leading also to two Latin Grammy wins for Ozuna and one for Rosalía’s collaborator, El Guincho. And “TKN,” her collaboration with Travis Scott, won best short form video (directed by Nicolás Méndez, aka CANADA). She’s now an 8-time Latin Grammy winner.

Carlos Vives also claimed three awards.

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter’s “Canción para Rubén,” alongside Ruben Blades, won best tropical song while his album Cumbiana won best contemporary/tropical fusion album and the documentary El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana won best long form video.

J Balvin, the top nominee of the evening, won the very competitive best urban album category for Colores, while Bad Bunny’s provocative “Yo Perreo Sola” won best reggaeton performance. The new category was one of the nods the Latin Recording Academy made this year toward appeasing a contingent of urban artists who felt neglected by the Latin Grammys.

The coveted record of the year award went to Alejandro Sanz’s “Contigo,” while song of the year went to Residente for his biographical beauty “René.”

In a surprise win, Mike Bahía took home the best new artist award, beating out some heavy competition, including Anuel AA, Nicky Nicole, Rauw Alejandro and Nathy Peluso.

“No, I didn’t expect this award,” he said backstage. “I’ve had beautiful career moments where awards, let’s say, haven’t really been with me. I didn’t think this would be the exception. But things happen for a reason, and I want to thank my colleagues for validating my work.”

Here’s the full winners list:

GENERAL FIELD:

Record Of The Year: “Contigo” — Alejandro Sanz
Album Of The Year: Un Canto Por México, Vol. 1 — Natalia Lafourcade
Song Of The Year: “René” — Residente, songwriter (Residente)
Best New Artist:
Mike Bahía
Best Pop Vocal Album
: Pausa — Ricky Martin
Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Compadres – Andrés Cepeda & Fonseca
Best Pop Song: “TuTu” – Camilo, Jon Leone & Richi López, songwriters (Camilo & Pedro Capó)
Best Urban Fusion/Performance: “Yo x Ti Tu x Mi” – Rosalía & Ozuna
Best Reggaeton Performance: “Yo Perreo Sola” — Bad Bunny
Best Urban Music Album:
Colores – J Balvin
Best Rap/Hip Hop Song:
“Antes Que El Mundo Se Acabe” – Residente, songwriter (Residente)
Best Urban Song: “Yo x Ti, Tu x Mi” – Pablo Diaz-Reixa “El Guincho”, Ozuna & Rosalía, songwriters (Rosalía & Ozuna)
Best Rock Album: “Dónde Jugarán Lxs Niñxs? – Molotov
Best Rock Song: “Biutiful” – Mon Laferte, songwriter (Mon Laferte)
Best Pop/Rock Album:
La Conquista del Espacio – Fito Paez
Best Pop/Rock Song: “La Canción de las Bestias” – Fito Páez, songwriter (Fito Páez)
Best Alternative Music Album: Sobrevolando – Cultura Profética
Best Alternative Song: “En Cantos” – Ismael Cancel, Ile & Natalia Lafourcade, songwriters (Ile & Natalia Lafourcade)
Best Salsa Album: 40 – Grupo Niche
Best Cumbia/Vallenato Album: Sigo Cantando Al Amor (Deluxe) – Jorge Celedón & Sergio Luis Rodríguez
Best Merengue/Bachata Album: Ahora – Eddy Herrera &
Larimar – Daniel Santacruz (Tie)
Best Traditional Tropical Album: Ícono – Orquesta Aragón
Best Contemporary/Tropical Fusion Album: Cumbiana — Carlos Vives
Best Tropical Song: “Canción Para Rubén” – Rubén Blades & Carlos Vives, songwriters (Carlos Vives & Rubén Blades)
Best Singer-Songwriter Album:
Mesa Para Dos – Kany García
Best Ranchero/Mariachi Album: Hecho en México — Alejandro Fernández Best Banda Album: Playlist – Chiquis
Best Tejano Album: Live In México – La Mafia
Best Norteño Album
: Los Tigres del Norte At Folsom Prison – Los Tigres del Norte
Best Regional Song: “Mi Religión” – Natalia Lafourcade, songwriter (Natalia Lafourcade)
Best Instrumental Album: Terra – Daniel Minimalia
Best Folk Album: A Capella – Susana Baca
Best Tango Album: Fuelle y Cuerda – Gustavo Casenave
Best Flamenco Album: Flamenco Son Fronteras – Antonio Rey
Best Latin Jazz/Jazz Album:
Puertos: Music from International Waters – Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra
Best Christian Album (Spanish Language): Soldados – Alex Campos
Best Portuguese Language Christian Album: Reino – Aline Barros
Best Portuguese Language Contemporary Pop Album: Apká! – Céu —
Best Portuguese Language Rock or Alternative Album: Amarelo – Emicida Best Samba/Pagode Album: Samba Jazz De Raiz, Claudio Jorge 70 – Cláudio Jorge
Best MPB (Musica Popular Brasileira) Album: Belo Horizonte – Toninho Horta & Orquestra Fantasma
Best Sertaneja Music Album: Origens [Ao Vivo Em Sete Lagoas, Brazil / 2019] – Paula Fernandes
Best Portuguese Language Roots Album: Veia Nordestina – Mariana Aydar — Best Portuguese Language Song: “Abricó-De-Macaco” — Francisco Bosco & João Bosco, songwriters (João Bosco)
Best Latin Children’s Album: Canta y Juega – Tina Kids
Best Classical Album: Eternal Gratitude – Paulina Leisring & Domingo Pagliuca; Samuel Pilafian, album producer
Best Classical Contemporary Composition
: “Sacre” – Carlos Fernando López & José Valentino, composers (Carlos Fernando López)
Best Arrangement: “La Flor de la Canela” – Lorenzo Ferrero, arranger (Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra)
Best Recording Package: Soy Puro Teatro – Homenaje a La Lupe – Pedro Fajardo, art director (Mariaca Semprún)
Best Engineered Album: 3:33 – Daniel Bitrán Arizpe, Daniel Dávila, Justin Moshkevich, George Noriega, Erick Roman, Paul Rubinstein & JC Vertti, engineers; Miles Comaskey, Najeeb Jones & Tony Maserati, mixers; Dale Becker, mastering engineer (Debi Nova)
Producer of the Year: Andrés Torres, Mauricio Rengifo
Best Short Form Music Video: “TKN” – Rosalía & Travis Scott / Nicolás Méndez aka CANADA, video director; Oscar Romagosa & Laura Serra Estorch, video producers
Best Long Form Music Video:
El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana – Carlos Vives / Carlos Felipe Montoya, video director; Isabel Cristina Vásquez, video producer

Aitana Teams Up with Sebastian Yatra on New Single “Corazón Sin Vida”

Aitana is sharing her soulless heart

The 21-year-old Spanish singer/songwriter has joined voices with Sebastian Yatra on the new single “Corazón Sin Vida.”

The emotive song, which features a fragment of Alejandro Sanz’s “Corazón Partió,” is for the broken-hearted person who has many unanswered questions.

“Why did you heal me when I was hurt, if today you leave me a lifeless heart again,” Aitana asks in the chorus.

Fusing their dulcet powerhouse vocals, Aitana and Yatra exchange their true feelings in this bluegrass-infused pop song.

On Instagram, Aitana expressed her gratitude to Sanz for allowing her to use part of his timeless hit and Yatra for jumping on the track.

J Balvin Earns 13 Latin Grammy Award Nominations, Including Two for Album of the Year

J Balvin is the man to beat…

The Latin Grammy Award nominations have been announced, with the 35-year-old Colombian reggaeton singer leading the pack of nominees with 13 nominations.

J Balvin

J Balvin’s nominations include two for album of the year and two for record of the year (“Rojo” & “China”).

Balvin has a chance to win his first album of the year prize — a category with 10 contenders — thanks to his fifth solo album “Colores” and “Oasis,” his collaborative project with Bad Bunny. Other nominees include Bad Bunny’s sophomore release “YHLQMDLG” as well as albums from Ricky Martin, Carlos Vives, Jesse & Joy, Kany García, Natalia Lafourcade, Camilo and Fito Paez.

Bad Bunny received nine nominations, including two for album of the year (YHLQMDLG & Oasis) and one for record of the year (“Vete”).

Ozuna has eight nominations, including one for record of the year (“China”).

For record of the year, which also has 10 nominees, contenders include popular hip-hop-flavored Latin songs that have dominated the Latin music charts and earned hundreds of millions plays on streaming services, with some even reaching the billion-mark on YouTube, including Karol G and Nicki Minaj’s global hit “Tusa” and “China” by Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna, Balvin and Marco Masis. Other nominees include Balvin’s “Rojo” and Bad Bunny’s “Vete.”

“Tusa” is the sole Latin trap nominee in the song of the year category, where 11 tracks are in contention. It’s a departure for Karol G, who didn’t receive a single nomination last year and was part of the group of uber-successful Latin trap and reggaeton artists who were dissed in top categories like album, song and record of the year.

This year, the 29-year-old Colombian performer, who was named best new artist in 2018, has four nominations, including two shared with Minaj. Karol G’s fiance, Puerto Rican rapper-singer Anuel AA, marked a major breakthrough this year as a first-time nominee. He scored seven nominations, including a bid for best new artist.

“Over the last year, we continued engaging in discussions with our members to improve the awards process and actively encouraged diverse Latin music creators to join and participate,” Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa Jr. said in a statement, calling this year’s nominees “a group that reflects the constant evolution of Latin music.”

As a result of last year’s debacle social media exploded as Latin artists posted images of the Grammy logo with a large red “X″ across it, with words on the image reading in Spanish: “Without reggaeton, there’s no Latin Grammys.” Balvin even skipped the live show and Bad Bunny, who won best urban music album during the telecast, told the audience: “With all due respect, reggaeton is part of the Latin culture.”

To honor Latin rap and reggaeton performers, the Latin Grammys added new categories this year, including best reggaeton performance and best rap/hip-hop song.

Balvin’s 13 nominations includes several categories where he will compete with himself: Outside of album and record of the year, he’s a double nominee in the best urban music album, best urban fusion/performance and best reggaeton performance categories. Ozuna and Bad Bunny will also compete with themselves in several categories.

Others who scored multiple nominations include Juanes, Martin, Alejandro Sanz, Camilo, Carlos Vives, Kany García and Residente, the most decorated winner in the history of Latin Grammys. Rosalía, who won album of the year last year and became the first solo female performer to win the top honor since Shakira’s triumph in 2006, earned four nominations this year.

Apart from Minaj’s two nominations, other popular American artists who will compete for awards include rapper Travis Scott (best short form music video for “TKN” with Rosalía); jazz master Chick Corea and his Spanish Heart Band (best Latin jazz/jazz album for “Antidote”); DJ-producer Diplo (best urban song for “Rave de Favela” ); and rapper Tyga (best reggaeton performance for “Loco Contigo” with DJ Snake and Balvin). Justin Bieber’s right-hand songwriter, Jason Boyd aka Poo Bear, earned an album of the year nomination for his work on Jesse & Joy’s “Aire (Versión Día).”

The 21st annual Latin Grammy Awards will air live on November 19 on Univision. The nominees in the 53 categories were selected from more than 18,000 entries. Songs and albums released between June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020 were eligible for nomination.

Click here to see the full Latin Grammy nominations.

Carlos Vives Launching “El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana” Documentary in Partnership with Grammy Museum

Carlos Vives is celebrating Colombia’s indigenous roots in music in a special way…

The 59-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is launching a special documentary, El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana, this Friday, August 21 on the Grammy Museum’s digital museum.

Carlos Vives

In May, Vives released his 14th studio album, Cumbiana, which married Colombia’s past with the future. The album shed light on the indigenous roots of Colombian music in a 10-set production that includes collaborations with Jessie Reyez, Alejandro Sanz, Ruben Blades and others.

Vives decided to bring his extensive research and musical exploration to the masses via the documentary, which is directed by Carlos Felipe Montoya and produced by Isabel Cristina Vasquez from Mestiza Films.

Vives spotlights the history of the amphibian universe to better understand the origins of cumbia and vallenato music, the ancestral spirits that inspired his latest production, and the environmental challenges the Magdalena River ecosystem is facing.

“I discovered a lost world. That’s the truth,” Vives previously told Billboard.

“We’ve always spoken about our African heritage in music. We’ve always thought that the most uplifting elements of our music came from Africa or from European rhythms like polka. But it turns out it comes from Andean or indigenous music. This album highlights the joy of the fusion of African, European, and indigenous music.”

El Mundo Perdido de Cumbiana, which also elaborates on the creative process of Cumbiana, will be available at 1:00 pm PT on Friday, August 21 at the Grammy Museum website for 72 hours only.

Following the screening, Vives will attend an exclusive conversation with NPR Alt Latino’s Felix Contreras to further discuss the documentary.

Pitizion Named a Latin Artist on the Rise by Billboard

Pitizion isn’t letting the coronavirus pandemic slow her momentum…

The 28-year-old Colombian singer, whose real name is María del Pilar Pérez, started 2020 with a lot of promise, including a music video with Greeicy and touring with Alejandro Sanz as his opening act. 

Pitizion

Despite the pause caused by the global pandemic, Pitizion has kept creating music and getting her name out there, recently being named a Latin Artist of the Rise by Billboard.

Born in the Llanos Region, Pitizion got on the radar with her acting career, making her debut on the popular Nickelodeon Latinoamérica show Grachi. About three years ago, she decided to share her musical talent on social media because her “music never left her room.”

“My passion for music derives from my father’s passing when I was a child,” the now Miami-based artist tells Billboard. “I didn’t know how to express my feelings and my way of doing so was writing lyrics and singing for him.”

Pitizion was ultimately discovered by record producer Andres Saavedra, who not only believed in her project, but also took her music to Universal Music Latin, where she officially signed in early 2019.

“I’ll be honest: I never saw this dream come true. I never imagined myself signing with a record label. I don’t know if that’s good or bad, but I didn’t have a lot of vision back then,” she admits. “It’s incredibly and completely changed my life. The most beautiful part is saying that Universal and Andres have taught me to dream and believe in myself.”

Since joining the Universal family, Pitizion has released her debut single “Ella” on July 5, 2019, dropped an eight-track EP dubbed La Piti, and nabbed collaborations with artists like Greeicy (“No Pasa Nada”) and Rafa Pabon and Big Soto for the remix of “Ella.”

Though she does not like to be boxed in a genre, Piti describes herself as a modern singer-songwriter with pop-urban melodies and hints of rap. Her empowering, witty lyrics and bohemian, global fusions are primarily influenced by artists like Cuban rappers Los Aldeanos, Puerto Rican rapper Rene “Residente” Perez, Spanish artist Bebe and Colombian vallenato stars. 

“I grabbed a little bit of what I heard in life and created my own version,” she concludes.

She’s currently making the rounds with her single “,” which sends a powerful message about self-love and diversity. 

Jesse & Joy Release Star-Studded “Love (Es Nuestro Idioma)” Music Video in Support of LGBTI+ Community

Jesse & Joy are spreading the love with some all-star assistance…

The Mexican Latin Grammy-winning brother and sister duo has released the official music video for “Love (Es Nuestro Idioma)” and it features appearances by nearly 200 people from around the world, including artists like ThalíaJuanes and more.

Jesse & Joy

The music video speaks out against violence toward the LGBTI+ community and raises awareness about conversion therapies that to this day take place in Mexico and other parts of the world.

“Our music will always be there to remind you that you are beautiful just as you are,” the Mexican previously said about the song, included in their recently-released album Aire. “It’s called ‘Love’ and talks about love being the universal language, the language that all of us should speak.”

Toward the end of the video, the message is loud and clear: “A sexual orientation is nothing something that should be cured. Conversion therapies are acts of torture and violation of privacy.”

Featuring cameos by Latin artists like Mon Laferte, Natalia JiménezÁngela Aguilar, Alejandro SanzLaura PausiniKany GarcíaAna BárbaraTommy Torres, Sofía Reyes, Luis Fonsi, among others, the video was directed by Kacho López and Joy. 

The release coincides with the landmark ruling officially protecting LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination issued by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Profits from the video will be donated to the YAAJ MEXICO Foundation to help the organization continue their social work in Mexico and for their work supporting sexual violence young victims.

Carlos Vives Releases Indigenous Roots-Inspired Album “Cumbiana”

Carlos Vives is going back to his roots…

The 58-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter has released his latest album, Cumbiana, a search for the indigenous roots of Colombian music. 

Carlos Vives

The album has been described as “exuberant, soulful, beautiful and important without ever sounding overbearing,” by Billboard.

The album features duets with Jessie ReyezRuben Blades and Alejandro Sanz,and ittreads that line between what’s commercial and what’s artistic.

“I discovered a lost world. That’s the truth,” Vives simply states, speaking from his home in Bogota, where he’s been in lockdown for the past two months.

“We’ve always spoken about our African heritage in music,” he adds. “We’ve always thought that the most uplifting elements of our music came from Africa or from European rhythms like polka. But it turns out it comes from Andean, or indigenous music. This album highlights the joy of the fusion of African, European and indigenous music.”

Marrying Colombia’s past with the future, Cumbianahas already delivered a chart hit with “No Te Vayas.” Edgier still is current single “For Sale,” a mix of traditional beats with reggaeton, a touch of rap and Sanz’s flamenco strains. Of course, Vives wrote the rulebook for Colombian fusion.

His 1994 album, La Tierra Del Olvido, where he marries Colombia’s most traditional folk beats — vallenato, cumbiaporro— with rock guitars and drums and pop sensibility, is the original blueprint of the sound that would later define the work of acts like JuanesFonseca and even Shakira at times.

But Cumbiana expands its realm. So much so that this is the first of a three-album project.

C. Tangana Releases New Single “Nunca Estoy”

C. Tanganaisn’t letting the COVID-19 pandemic slow him down…

The 29-year-old Spanish rapper, whose real name is Antón Álvarez Alfaro, has released his new single “Nunca Estoy.”

C. Tangana

The nearly three-minute song focuses on the challenges of a love that’s already broken. 

“How do you expect me to love you, if you’re not here?” C. Tangana croons. 

Written from the woman’s point of view and produced by Alizzz and NINETEEN 85, “Nunca Estoy” makes reference to some of Spain’s finest like Rosario’s “Como quieres que te quiera” and Alejandro Sanz’s “Corazon Partio.”

The track is accompanied by a 90s-inspired home video, directed by Javier Ruiz, showing a mashup of personal videos filmed during the artist’s quarantine in Mexico, back home in Madrid and life on the road.

Rosalia Makes History with Grammy Nomination for Best New Artist

It’s a brand new (artist)day for Rosalia

The 26-year-old Spanish singer/songwriter has earned the first two Grammy nominations of her career, including a historic nod for Best New Artist.

Rosalia

Rosalia, a five-time Latin Grammy winner, is the first all-Spanish language singer to be nominated in the best new artist category. Other Latino artists have been nominated in the category over the years, including Vikki Carr in 1963, and Mariah CareyChristina Aguilera and Esperanza Spalding have won the award. Even José Feliciano won best new artist in 1969, bolstered by his hit version of the Doors’ “Light My Fire.” But the previous nominees and winners were not, however, honored for their work recorded exclusively in Spanish.

Rosalia’s second nomination comes in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for her second studio album, El Mal Querer. The album took home all the Latin Grammy awards it was nominated for, including Album of the Year, one of the top awards of the night.

Bad Bunny picked up two nominations… in the same category.

The 25-year-old Puerto Rican Latin trap and reggaeton singer-rapper is nominated in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category for his Latin Grammy-winning debut album X 100PRE, as well as his collaborative album with J Balvin, Oasis.

Esperanza Spalding, a four-time Grammy winner, including Best New Artist, has picked up two nods this year. 

The 35-year-old part-Latinajazz bassist and singer is nominated in the Best Jazz Vocal Album category for her album12 Little Spells. She’s also up for Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals for serving as the arranger on her own single track “12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine).”

Vince Mendoza is back in familiar territory…

The 58-year-old Latino music arranger, conductorand composer, a multi-Grammy winner, has picked up four nominations. 

He’s nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for his work on Trisha Yearwood’s “Over The Rainbow.” 

Mendoza picked up two nods in the Best Instrumental Composition category for conducting Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band’s “Begin Again,” as well as composing “Love, A Beautiful Force,” his single with Terell StaffordDick Oatts and the Temple University Studio Orchestra.

Emilio Solla is in the running for a Grammy this year…

The Argentine pianist and composer is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella category for arranging “La Novena,” his single with the Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra.

Diego Figueiredo picked up a nod

The 39-year-old Brazilian musician is nominated in the Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals category for arrangement alongside Cyrille Aiméeon Aimée’s “Marry Me A Little.”

Camila Cabello, a two-time Grammy nominee last year, has earned a nod this year…

The 22-year-old Mexican and Cuban singer and former Fifth Harmony member is nominated in the Best Pop Duo/Group Performance category for her collaboration with Shawn Mendes, “Señorita.” 

Cardi B has earned a nod this year…

The 27-year-old half-Dominican American rap superstar, who picked up her first Grammy at this year’s awards show for her debut album Invasion of Privacy, is up for Best Rap Performance for her work opposite Offset on “Clout.”

Rodrigo y Gabrielahave reason to celebrate…

The Mexican acoustic guitar duo, comprised of Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero, picked up its first Grammy nomination. Rodrigo y Gabriela is nominated in the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album category for Mettavolution.

Jessie Reyez is a first-time Grammynominee…

The 28-year-old Colombian singer-songwriter is nominated in the Best Urban Contemporary Album category for her sophomore album Being Human In Public. The album picked up a Juno Award in her home country of Canada for RnB/Soul Recording of the Year.

Sebastian Plano is celebrating his Grammy nod…

The Argentine composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist is nominated in the Best New Age Album category for his albumVerve.

Melissa Aldana has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 30-year-old Chilean tenor saxophone player is nominated in the Best Improvised Jazz Solo category for “Elsewhere.”

The nominees in the Best Latin Jazz Album include Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band (Antidote), Thalma De Freitas with Vitor GonçalvesJohn PatitucciChico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato Duduka Da Fonse (Sorte!: Music By John Finbury), Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Rubén Blades (Una Noche Con Rubén Blades), David Sánchez (Carib), and Miguel Zenón (Sonero: The Music of Ismael Rivera)

The Best Latin Pop Album nominees include an eclectic mix of artists: Luis Fonsi (Vida), Maluma (11:11), Ricardo Montaner (Montaner), Alejandro Sanz (#ELDISCO), and Sebastian Yatra (Fantasía).

In addition to Bad Bunny, J Balvin and Rosalia, the nominees in the Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album category include Flor De Toloache (Indestructible) and iLe(Almadura).

The Best Regional Mexican Music Album (including Tejano) include Joss Favela (Caminando), Intocable (Percepción), La Energia Norteña (Poco A Poco), Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea (20 Aniversario), and Mariachi Los Camperos (De Ayer Para Siempre).

The Best Tropical Latin Album nominees include Marc Anthony (Opus), Luis Enrique + C4Trio (Tiempo Al Tiempo), Vicente Garcia (Candela), Juan Luis Guerra 4.40 (Literal) and Aymée Nuviola (A Journey Through Cuban Music).

The Best Musical Theater Album nominees includeHadestown, with Eva Noblezada as one of the principal soloists, and Moulin Rouge! The Musical, with Karen Olivo as one of the principal soloists. It’s the first Grammy nod for both Noblezada, who is half-Mexican American, and Olivo, who is part Puerto Rican and Dominican American.

Gustavo Dudamelis back in the hunt for a Grammy

The 38-year-oldVenezuelan-Spanish conductor and violinist, who won his first Grammy in 2011, is nominated in the Best Orchestral Performance category for conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonnic’s Norman: Sustain.”

FKA Twigs has picked up her first Grammy nomination…

The 31-year-old part-Spanish singer is up for Best Music Video for her acclaimed music video for “Cellophane.”

Lizzo led the pack with eight nods, while Billie Eillish and Lil Nas Xfollowed close behind with six nominations each. All three musicians are first-time Grammy nominees.

Alicia Keyswill return as host the ceremony for the second year in a row, making her the third womanand the first female musician to host the show twice.

The Grammy Awardswill take place on January 26 at the Staples Centerin Los Angeles. The broadcast will air live on CBSat 5:00 pm PT/ 8:00 pm ET.

Here’s a look at the categories with Latino nominees:

GENERAL FIELD

Best New Artist
Black Pumas
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Maggie Rogers
Rosalía
Tank and the Bangas
Yola

POP FIELD

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:
“Boyfriend” — Ariana Grande & Social House
“Sucker” — Jonas Brothers
“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus
“Señorita” — Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album:
Ancestral Recall — Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
Star People Nation — Theo Croker
Beat Music! Beat Music! Beat Music! — Mark Guiliana
Elevate — Lettuce
Mettavolution — Rodrigo y Gabriela

R&B

Best Urban Contemporary Album:
Apollo XXI — Steve Lacy
Cuz I Love You (Deluxe) — Lizzo
Overload — Georgia Anne Muldrow
Saturn — Nao
Being Human In Public — Jessie Reyez

RAP

Best Rap Performance:
“Middle Child” — J.Cole
“Suge” — DaBaby
“Down Bad” — Dreamville ft. J.I.D, Bas, J. Cole, Earthgang & Young Nudy
“Racks In The Middle” — Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy
“Clout” — Offset ft. Cardi B

NEW AGE

Best New Age Album:
Fairy Dreams — David Arkenstone
Homage To Kindness — David Darling
Wings — Peter Kater
Verve — Sebastian Plano
Deva — Deva Premal

JAZZ

Best Improvised Jazz Solo:
“Elsewhere” — Melissa Aldana, soloist
“Sozinho” — Randy Brecker, soloist
“Tomorrow Is The Question” — Julian Lage, soloist
“The Windup” — Brandford Marsalis, soloist
“Sightseeing” — Christian McBride, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album:
Thirsty Ghost — Sara Gazarek
Love & Liberation — Jazzmeia Horn
Alone Together — Catherine Russell
12 Little Spells — Esperanza Spalding
Screenplay — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Latin Jazz Album:
Antidote — Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band
Sorte!: Music By John Finbury — Thalma De Freitas With Vitor Gonçalves, John Patitucci, Chico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato & Duduka Da Fonseca
Una Noche Con Rubén Blades — Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis & Rubén Blades
Carib — David Sánchez
Sonero: The Music Of Ismael Rivera — Miguel Zenón

LATIN

Best Latin Pop Album:
Vida — Luis Fonsi
11:11 — Maluma
Montaner — Ricardo Montaner
#ELDISCO — Alejandro Sanz
Fantasía — Sebastian Yatra

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:
X 100PRE — Bad Bunny
Oasis — J Balvin & Bad Bunny
Indestructible — Flor De Toloache
Almadura — iLe
El Mal Querer – Rosalía

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano):
Caminando — Joss Favela
Percepción — Intocable
Poco A Poco — La Energia Norteña
20 Aniversario — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea
De Ayer Para Siempre — Mariachi Los Camperos

Best Tropical Latin Album:
Opus — Marc Anthony
Tiempo Al Tiempo — Luis Enrique + C4 Trio
Candela — Vicente García
Literal — Juan Luis Guerra 4.40
A Journey Through Cuban Music — Aymée Nuviola

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

Best American Roots Performance:
“Saint Honesty” — Sara Bareilles
“Father Mountain” — Calexico With Iron & Wine
“I’m On My Way” — Rhiannon Giddens With Francesco Turrisi
“Call My Name” — I’m With Her
“Faraway Look” — Yola

MUSICAL THEATER

Best Musical Theater Album:
Ain’t Too Proud: The Life And Times Of The Temptations — Saint Aubyn, Derrick Baskin, James Harkness, Jawan M. Jackson, Jeremy Pope & Ephraim Sykes, principal soloists; Scott M. Riesett, producer (Original Broadway Cast)
Hadestown — Reeve Carney, André De Shields, Amber Gray, Eva Noblezada & Patrick Page, principal soloists; Mara Isaacs, David Lai, Anaïs Mitchell & Todd Sickafoose, producers (Anaïs Mitchell, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)
Moulin Rouge! The Musical — Danny Burstein, Tam Mutu, Sahr Ngaujah, Karen Olivo & Aaron Tveit, principal soloists; Justin Levine, Baz Luhrmann, Matt Stine & Alex Timbers, producers (Original Broadway Cast)
The Music Of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child – In Four Contemporary Suites — Imogen Heap, producer; Imogen Heap, composer (Imogen Heap)
Oklahoma! — Damon Daunno, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Ali Stroker, Mary Testa & Patrick Vaill, principal soloists; Daniel Kluger & Dean Sharenow, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2019 Broadway Cast)

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:
The Lion King: The Songs — (Various Artists)
Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood — (Various Artists)
Rocketman — Taron Egerton
Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse — (Various Artists)
A Star Is Born — Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper

COMPOSING/ARRANGING

Best Instrumental Composition:
“Begin Again” — Fred Hersch, composer (Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band Conducted By Vince Mendoza)
“Crucible For Crisis” — Brian Lynch, composer (Brian Lynch Big Band)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite” — John Williams, composer (John Williams)
“Walkin’ Funny” — Christian McBride, composer (Christian McBride)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella:
“Blue Skies” — Kris Bowers, arranger (Kris Bowers)
“Hedwig’s Theme” — John Williams, arranger (Anne-Sophie Mutter & John Williams)
“La Novena” — Emilio Solla, arranger (Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Moon River” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:
“All Night Long” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier Featuring Jules Buckley, Take 6 & Metropole Orkest)
“Jolene” — Geoff Keezer, arranger (Sara Gazarek)
“Marry Me A Little” — Cyrille Aimée & Diego Figueiredo, arrangers (Cyrille Aimée)
“Over The Rainbow” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Trisha Yearwood)
“12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine)” — Esperanza Spalding, arranger (Esperanza Spalding)

PACKAGE

Best Recording Package:
Anónimas & Resilientes — Luisa María Arango, Carlos Dussan, Manuel García-Orozco & Juliana Jaramillo-Buenaventura, art directors (Voces Del Bullerengue)
Chris Cornell — Barry Ament, Jeff Ament, Jeff Fura & Joe Spix, art directors (Chris Cornell)
Hold That Tiger — Andrew Wong & Fongming Yang, art directors (The Muddy Basin Ramblers)
i,i — Aaron Anderson & Eric Timothy Carlson, art directors (Bon Iver)
Intellexual — Irwan Awalludin, art director (Intellexual)

NOTES

Best Album Notes:
The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions — Judy Cantor-Navas, album notes writer (Various Artists)
The Gospel According To Malaco — Robert Marovich, album notes writer (Various Artists)
Pedal Steel + Four Corners — Brendan Greaves, album notes writer (Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band)
Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection — Jeff Place, album notes writer (Pete Seeger)
Stax ’68: A Memphis Story — Steve Greenberg, album notes writer (Various Artists)

CLASSICAL

Best Orchestral Performance:
“Bruckner: Symphony No. 9” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)
“Copland: Billy The Kid; Grohg” — Leonard Slatkin, conductor (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
“Norman: Sustain” — Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)
“Transatlantic” — Louis Langrée, conductor (Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra)
“Weinberg: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21” — Mirga Gražinytė-tyla, conductor (City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra & Kremerata Baltica)

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

Best Music Video:
“We’ve Got To Try” — The Chemical Brothers, Ellie Fry, video director; Ninian Doff, video producer
“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Savanah Leaf, video director; Alicia Martinez, video producer
“Cellophane” — FKA twigs, Andrew Thomas Huang, video director; Alex Chamberlain, video producer
“Old Town Road (Official Movie)” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus, Calmatic, video director; Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, video producers
“Glad He’s Gone” — Tove Lo,  Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Natan Schottenfels, video producer

Miguel to Perform for the First-Time at the Latin Grammys

Miguel is preparing for Latin music’s biggest night…

The 34-year-old Mexican American R&B singer, songwriter, who released the Spanish EP Te Lo Dije earlier this year, is set to perform at this year’s Latin Grammys, according to The Latin Recording Academy.

Miguel

Miguel is part ofthe final wave of performers and presenters joining the star-studded 2019 Latin Grammys lineup.

In addition to Miguel, who performed “Remember Me” with Natalia Lafourcade on the soundtrack to Disney’s Dia de los Muertos-themed animated film Coco, new additions to the performers roster include Alicia KeysFarrukoOzunaResidenteBeto CuevasCalibre 50Leonel GarcíaFito PáezMilly QuezadaTony SuccarCarlos Rivera, and Prince Royce.

Plus, Ángela AguilarEduardo “Visitante” Cabra,Sofia CarsonEmilio EstefanMon LaferteWilliam LevyRudy Mancuso,,Luis Gerardo MéndezMichael Peña, and Dayanara Torres join as presenters. 

Nominees CamiloDe La GhettoPaula FernandesKany GarcíaChristian Nodal and Tommy Torres were previously announced as presenters.

Coined as “the biggest night in Latin Music,” the awards show will kick off with a never-before-seen tribute honoring the 20th Anniversary of the Latin Grammys. A group of 20 artists, who’ll perform together for the first time, will interpret multiple iconic songs spanning various genres of Latin music while commemorating the past 20 years of excellence.

The final roster of performers join already confirmed artists Aitana, Anitta, Pedro CapóJulio Reyes CopelloDarellDimelo FlowFonsecaLuis FonsiGreeicyIntocableNellaReikRosalía, and Alejandro Sanz, who’s this year’s top nominee. 

The awards show will also include performances by Pepe Aguilar and Los Angeles AzulesPaula ArenasBad BunnyAlessia CaraDraco Rosa, Ximena SariñanaSech, Sebastián YatraNatalia Jiménez, Olga Tañón and Juanes, who as the 2019 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year will perform a medley of his biggest hits.

VicenteAlejandro, and Alex Fernandezwill also take the stage, becoming the first time all three generations of the Fernandez family will perform at the show. They’ll be joined by Mariachi Sol de Mexico

The 20th annual Latin Grammys, which will be co-hosted by Ricky Martin and actresses Roselyn Sánchez and Paz Vega, will air live Nov. 14 from the MGM Grand Garden Arenain Las Vegas via Univision.